Hip Replacement Patients Benefit From Apixaban

The clot-inhibiting drug apixaban (trade name: Eliquis®) was approved in May 2011 for the prevention of thrombosis (blood clots) after operations to replace a hip or knee joint. In an early benefit assessment pursuant to the “Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products” (AMNOG), the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) examined the added benefit of apixaban.

IQWiG found proof of minor added benefit for adult patients who had undergone hip replacement: symptomatic clots in the deep veins of the leg occurred less frequently with apixaban treatment than with the comparator therapy.

Infections In Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Mayo Clinic Study Finds Way To Pinpoint Risk

Rheumatoid arthritis alone is painful and disabling, but it also puts patients at higher risk of death. The greater susceptibility to infections that accompanies the autoimmune disorder is one reason. Assessing the danger of infection a particular patient faces so it can be addressed can prove challenging for physicians. A Mayo Clinic study finds that a risk score can be developed to predict a patient’s chances of having serious infections. The score uses information about how rheumatoid arthritis is affecting a patient, plus factors including age, corticosteroid use and the presence of other illnesses.

Introducing Decision Aids May Lower Surgery For Arthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 06 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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After Group Health Cooperative introduced video-based “decision aids” for people with knee and hip arthritis, rates of knee and hip replacement surgeries dropped sharply: by 38 and 26 percent, respectively, over six months. The cost of caring for those patients also declined: by 12 percent to 21 percent, according to an article in the September Health Affairs.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Infection Risk Identified

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Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Pain / Anesthetics
Article Date: 05 Sep 2012 – 13:00 PDT

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Scientists have managed to predict when rheumatoid arthritis patients are most likely to suffer infections.
Not only is rheumatoid arthritis crippling and agonizing, it also makes the patient more vulnerable to infections that coincide with the disorder, increasing their risk of death. However, physicians have had a difficult time assessing the potential danger of infection an individual might face.

Researchers Study Use Of MRI In Osteoarthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: MRI / PET / Ultrasound;  Bones / Orthopedics
Article Date: 03 Sep 2012 – 1:00 PDT

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A study conducted by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) shows that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a high prevalence of abnormalities associated with knee osteoarthritis in middle-aged and elderly patients that had no evidence of knee osteoarthritis in X-ray images.

Mystery Surrounding The Death Of Two Sisters Nearly 50 Years Ago Solved By Researchers

Main Category: Bones / Orthopedics
Also Included In: Genetics;  Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 31 Aug 2012 – 1:00 PDT

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Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have identified the genetic cause of a rare and fatal bone disease by studying frozen skin cells that were taken from a child with the condition almost fifty years ago. Their study, which details how the MT1-MMP gene leads to the disease known as Winchester syndrome, appears in the online edition of The American Journal of Human Genetics.

Potential New Type Of Diagnostic Imaging Technology Using Collagen-Seeking Synthetic Protein Could Lead Doctors To Tumor Locations

Main Category: Medical Devices / Diagnostics
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Cancer / Oncology
Article Date: 31 Aug 2012 – 2:00 PDT

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Johns Hopkins researchers have created a synthetic protein that, when activated by ultraviolet light, can guide doctors to places within the body where cancer, arthritis and other serious medical disorders can be detected.

Collaborative Care Facilitates Therapy Compliance For Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis Improves Function, Pain, And Quality Of Life

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Pharmacy / Pharmacist;  Rehabilitation / Physical Therapy
Article Date: 30 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Canadian researchers have determined that community-based pharmacists could provide an added resource in identifying knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study, published in Arthritis Care Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), represents the first evidence supporting a collaborative approach to managing knee OA. Findings suggest that involving pharmacists, physiotherapists, and primary care physicians in caring for OA patients improves the quality of care, along with patient function, pain, and quality of life.

Osteoarthritis Pain Targeted

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Pain / Anesthetics;  Seniors / Aging
Article Date: 23 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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The research relates to a family of molecules firstly discovered in Melbourne that applied to blood cell development. One of these, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or GM-CSF, acts as a messenger between cells acting at a site of inflammation.

Oral Drug Shows Clinical Response And Remission In Some Patients With Ulcerative Colitis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Crohn’s / IBD
Article Date: 16 Aug 2012 – 2:00 PDT

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An investigational drug currently under FDA review for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has now shown positive results in patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego, School of Medicine. The study will appear in the August 16, 2012 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).