Following Surgery To Remove Brain Tumor, Uninsured Patients May Be More Likely Than Insured To Die

Main Category: Health Insurance / Medical Insurance
Also Included In: Neurology / Neuroscience;  Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 21 Nov 2012 – 0:00 PST

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Following Surgery To Remove Brain Tumor, Uninsured Patients May Be More Likely Than Insured To Die

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Uninsured patients who undergo surgery to remove a brain tumor could be twice as likely to die in the hospital as those who have the same operation but are privately insured, new Johns Hopkins research suggests. In teaching hospitals, where most neurosurgical procedures take place, those with government-subsidized insurance in the form of Medicaid were found in the same study to have rates of survival closer to those who are privately insured.

Improving Outpatient Management Could Reduce The High Rate Of Readmission Of Kidney Transplant Patients

Main Category: Transplants / Organ Donations
Also Included In: Urology / Nephrology;  Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 18 Oct 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Improving Outpatient Management Could Reduce The High Rate Of Readmission Of Kidney Transplant Patients

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Three in 10 patients receiving a kidney transplant require readmission to the hospital within 30 days of discharge following surgery, according to a Johns Hopkins analysis of six years of national data.

Small Study Finds Preemies From Low-Income Families At High Risk For Dangerous Brain Bleeds

Main Category: Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Also Included In: Neurology / Neuroscience;  Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 15 Oct 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Small Study Finds Preemies From Low-Income Families At High Risk For Dangerous Brain Bleeds

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Babies born prematurely to low-income parents have a disproportionately high risk for developing dangerous brain bleeds that require multiple surgeries and extensive follow-up, according to a small Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study.

Knowledge Of The Biochemical Events Needed To Maintain Erection May Lead To New Therapies For Erectile Dysfunction

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Article Date: 28 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT

Knowledge Of The Biochemical Events Needed To Maintain Erection May Lead To New Therapies For Erectile Dysfunction

For two decades, scientists have known the biochemical factors that trigger penile erection, but not what’s needed to maintain one. Now an article by Johns Hopkins researchers, scheduled to be published this week by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), uncovers the biochemical chain of events involved in that process. The information, they say, may lead to new therapies to help men who have erectile dysfunction.