Man Fined £10,000 For Illegal Sale Of Lifestyle Drugs, UK

Main Category: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs
Also Included In: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Article Date: 27 May 2011 – 10:00 PDT

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A 27-year-old man from Uxbridge in northwest London was yesterday (26 May 2011) fined £10,000 at Southwark Crown Court for selling unlicensed medicines for erectile dysfunction.

Saranjit Bhambra pleaded guilty on 26 April 2011 to one offence of selling medicinal products that contain ingredients found in medicines that can only be supplied with a prescription or by a qualified pharmacist.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) launched the investigation known as Operation Rome following a test purchase of a pack of four Tadil tablets from Bhambra’s website.

The test purchase led to a search at a car mechanic’s garage, where officers found evidence connected to an illegal online pharmacy supplying medicinal products including tadalafil and sildenafil.
Both tadalafil and sildenafil are potent active ingredients and should only be taken when directed by a healthcare professional, who has access to a patient’s individual records, and supplied through a registered pharmacy.

MHRA Head of Enforcement, Mick Deats, said: “While websites such as these may look professional, what we see behind the scenes tells a very different story.

“These unlicensed medicines were being sold from a mechanic’s garage which means they risk additional contamination due to the unsanitary conditions in which they were stored.

“Anyone considering taking medication for erectile dysfunction (ED) should consult a healthcare professional so that the right diagnosis can be made as this could be a symptom of a more serious medical condition.

“The unlawful sale of medicines, including those to treat ED, poses a serious threat to public health and today’s sentence reflects the nature and gravity of this crime.”

Notes

1. Under the Medicines Act 1968 the penalty on indictment is a maximum of two years imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine.

2. Members of the public are advised that they should only take prescription-only medicines after an appropriate consultation with their GP. Only healthcare professionals can take into account risks and benefits associated with every medicine.

3. Unlicensed medicines have not been tested to European standards of safety, quality and efficacy.

Source:

MHRA



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FDA Warns About Counterfeit ExtenZe Dietary Supplements

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Also Included In: Regulatory Affairs / Drug Approvals;  Men’s health
Article Date: 16 May 2011 – 1:00 PDT

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers about a potentially harmful product represented as “ExtenZe,” a dietary supplement for male sexual enhancement. The counterfeit product looks similar to the actual product, but contains hidden ingredients that can cause serious harm to consumers. The counterfeit product has the following lot numbers on the packages:

– LOT 1110075

– LOT F050899

FDA laboratory analysis confirmed that the counterfeit product contains tadalafil, or a combination of tadalafil and sildenafil –active ingredients in FDA-approved prescription medicines for erectile dysfunction. These ingredients are not listed on the product label.

These ingredients may interact with other medicines, like the nitrates found in some prescription medicines such as nitroglycerin, and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. Men with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or heart disease often take nitrates.

The counterfeit product is illegal and unsafe. The FDA is advising consumers not to purchase any products labeled as “ExtenZe” with lot numbers 1110075 and F050899. Consumers who have an ExtenZe product should check the lot numbers on the package to make sure they do not have a counterfeit product. Consumers who think they might have the counterfeit product should:

– stop taking the product; and

– contact their health care professional if they are experiencing any negative side effects.

“This incident is an example of a growing trend of products marketed as dietary supplements or conventional foods with hidden drugs and chemicals,” said Ilisa Bernstein, deputy director of the Office of Compliance in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “These types of products are typically promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, and body building, and are often represented as being ‘all natural.’ Consumers should exercise caution before purchasing products promoted for these uses.”

Health care professionals and consumers are encouraged to report any adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

– Complete and submit the report online here.

– Download form or call 800-332-1088 800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 800-FDA-0178

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

Source:

U.S. Food and Drug Administration



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Studies Link Quality Of Sleep To Erectile Dysfunction, Other Urologic Conditions

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Also Included In: Urology / Nephrology;  Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia
Article Date: 16 May 2011 – 2:00 PDT

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Two studies that link the quality of sleep to the occurrence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and other urologic conditions were presented to reporters during a special press conference at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC, Sunday, May 14, at 2:00 p.m. during the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA). The session will be moderated by Kevin McVary, MD.

Erectile Dysfunction Is Independently Associated With Sleep Apnea In A Large Population Of Middle-Aged Men (#1325): In the largest study to date demonstrating the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and erectile dysfunction, researchers from Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York evaluated 870 consecutively enrolled men in the ongoing Law Enforcement Cardiac Screening program (LECS), a subset of the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program. Patients who scored positive on the Berlin Questionnaire (a widely used survey for OSA) were defined to be at high risk for OSA. ED was assessed by use of the International Index of Erectile Function -5 (IIEF-5), and was defined as IIEF of less than 22. A multivariate, binary logistic regression was performed to adjust for age, history of cardiovascular disease, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and body mass index (BMI).

The mean age of the patients in the study population was 47.3 years, with a mean BMI of 30.2. Sixty-three percent of the patients screened positive for OSA, 5.6 percent had a history of diabetes, and 29 percent had a smoking history. After adjusting for age and comorbidities, the patients with ED were more than twice more likely to have OSA than their normal counterparts. The likelihood of having OSA increased as the severity of erectile dysfunction increased, suggesting that men with this condition should also be screened for OSA.

Sleep Predicts The Development Of Urologic Symptoms In A Longitudinal Study (#57): Sleep is a modifiable risk factor that precedes certain urologic conditions (urinary incontinence [UI], lower urinary tract symptoms [LUTS] and nocturia) in men and women, perhaps operating through inflammatory and other pathways, according to a study by researchers at New England Research Institutes Inc. in Watertown, MA.

In the prospective cohort analyses of 1,610 men and 2, 535 women who completed the baseline and follow-up phases of the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) survey, researchers followed the subjects for five years, assessing sleep disturbance and the development of urologic symptoms. Baseline short sleep duration (men only) was defined as sleeping fewer than five hours per night, and sleep quality was defined as having restless sleep in the past week. LUTS were assessed using the AUA Symptom Index, urinary incontinence was defined as weekly urine leakage, and nocturia was defined as needing to urinate more than two times per night after falling asleep.

Incidence of LUTS among men (8 percent) and women (13 percent) was strongly related to short sleep duration among men and restless sleep among men and women. Incidences of UI and nocturia were associated with restless sleep among women but not men.

“We know that proper amounts of sleep and quality of sleep can impact a wide range of health conditions including erectile function and lower urinary tract symptoms,” said AUA spokesperson Kevin T. McVary, MD. “These data may help us better assess how helping patients modify their sleep patterns may help improve their health and overall quality of life.”

Source:

American Urological Association



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Global Health Ventures Announces Interim Data From The European Clinical Trails Of X-Excite Vs. Viagra

Main Category: Clinical Trials / Drug Trials
Also Included In: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Article Date: 31 Mar 2011 – 1:00 PDT

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Global Health Ventures Inc. (OTCBB:GHLV), a specialty pharmaceutical company, is pleased to announce the interim results of the clinical trials conducted in Europe under the EMEA guideline protocols for its lead therapeutic drug, X-Excite.

Data analysis from a small number of patients showed the drug to meet the three Pharmacokinetics (PK) end points. Blood analysis of the patients receiving X-Excite showed the drug to appear in the blood 173% faster than Pfizer Viagra®. By 10 minutes about one quarter of peak concentration (T max Value) apeared in the blood. Further, X-Excite (blood concentration, C max) never exceeded the C max of Viagra®, a good sign for drug’s acceptability as biosimilar. Additionally the T max was lo! wer (about 15%), and better (wider) spread, a possible sign of less side effects. Finally it appeared that X-Excite remains in the blood slightly longer than Viagra®, possibly due to some gastric absorption, thus may provide a longer performance. Although these are the results of a small number of patients, it indicates a highly positive trend and it is meeting our expectations.

Additional studies are underway and further data will be released upon their availability. In this study we compared the blood profile of X-Excite with Pfizer’s Viagra® in a neck to neck study. In the trials, an open label PK profiling of both drugs were conducted in 24 patients of which 12 received Viagra® and 12 received X-Excite. X-Excite is a sublingual formulation of sildenafil citrate. Sildenafil citrate is used to make one of Pfizer Incorporated’s largest sellers Viagra®.

“We are very pleased with the interim data thus far obtained and looking forward to get additional data, and full blood profiling from our partners in Europe. The data obtained from this small study is highly encouraging and merits the next study to be conducted under FDA guidelines in the United States,” said Dr. Hassan Salari, Global Health President CEO.

About Sublingual Technology

The Company’s sublingual formulation is designed to enhance drugs to be delivered to the body without the need for injection. This design enables the vast majority of pharmaceutical drugs to be rapidly absorbed through the mucosal membrane (tissues of the mouth) quickly and efficiently. This tec! hnology works well for drugs that need faster results and have major side effects associated with gastrointestinal and/or liver breakdown. It is scientifically accepted that sublingual drug delivery route is the fastest and most efficient way of drug delivery after direct injection. The technology is tested against 40 major drugs and all can benefit from it.

Source:

Global Health Venture



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First And Only Melt-In-The-mouth Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Treatment Launches In The UK Today

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Article Date: 21 Mar 2011 – 17:00 PDT

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Today marks the launch of the first ED treatment available as an orodispersible tablet. In contrast to other drugs of the same class, the new formulation has been designed specifically to be discreet and convenient, has a minty flavour and dissolves on the tongue within seconds2. It is packaged in a new, thin black pocket-sized box which is unlike traditional pharmaceutical packaging and also incorporates numerous anti-counterfeiting measures. Currently, an estimated 2.3 million UK men suffer from ED, yet only 1 in 10 receive treatment3 and according to market research commissioned by Bayer, 4 in 10 men regard presently available therapies as inconvenient4.

“Bayer is committed to men’s health and is continuously striving to develop new and innovative treatment options for people living with erectile dysfunction, which is becoming more prevalent in the UK but is still undertreated,” said Marc van Unen, Business Unit Head General Medicine. “Levitra orodispersible was developed to help remove the known barriers associated with erectile dysfunction medication by providing men with a more convenient and discreet treatment option which may also help to lessen the embarrassment surrounding the condition. It is hoped that ultimately, the advantages of the new product and its discreet packaging, which includes 120 anti-counterfeiting measures, will reduce the growing numbers of patients purchasing counterfeit pills online and lead to improved patient satisfaction and treatment outcomes in ED overall.”

According to the 2009 European Association of Urology Guidelines, the patient has an important role in treatment decisions for ED.5 Prior to the launch of the new formulation, Bayer commissioned market research on 300 patients and 240 physicians to explore levels of satisfaction with current ED medication.4 It found that patients’ interest in trying the new formulation was high, due to its convenience and product characteristics (e.g. dissolves in the mouth in seconds, there’s no need to take it with water and it’s discreet).4 In addition, 9 out of 10 physicians had a positive overall impression of it, particularly with regards to its taste, efficacy and convenience.4

The new formulation was approved by the European Commission in September 2010 and is the first and only ED medication to be available in this convenient orodispersible formulation, yet it comes with the proven safety and efficacy and similar pharmacokinetic profile to that of the Levitra film-coated tablet.6

Dr Geoff Hackett, Consultant in Sexual Medicine, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield said; “Despite the fact that a range of PDE-5 inhibitors exist, uptake has always been relatively low so the majority of ED sufferers go untreated or risk obtaining unregulated medication online.” He continued: “I hope that the availability of the new formulation will encourage men who are having erection problems to discuss the condition with a healthcare professional, and re-assure those diagnosed patients that are dissatisfied with their current treatment, that other alternatives exist.”

The overall efficacy and safety of Levitra orodispersible tablet has been demonstrated in two large independent clinical trials.6,7,8 For this registration, it was tested in the Phase III multinational trials POTENT I and II (Pivotal phase III trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of an Orodispersible Tablet vardenafil versus placebo in the treatment of men with Erectile dysfunction: a fixed-dose, double-blind, raNdomised multicentre Trial).7,8

These pivotal studies compared the efficacy and safety of the new formulation with placebo after 12 weeks of treatment in a general population of men with ED. These two international twin studies were conducted with identical study design, enrolling a total of 882 men above the age of 18 years who had ED for more than 6 months. For both POTENT I and POTENT II studies, the new formulation was statistically significantly superior to placebo for all primary and secondary efficacy measures (all p

References

  1. Bayer HealthCare Levitra® orodispersible tablets summary of product characteristics, updated September 2010
  2. Heinig R, Weimann B, Dietrich H, et al. Pharmacokinetics of a new orodispersible tablet formulation of vardenafil. Clin Drug Invest 2011;31(1):27-41
  3. Sexual Dysfunction Association – Impotence or Erectile Dysfunction Factsheet. www.sda.uk.net/downloads/Impotence_or_erectile_dysfunction.pdf (accessed March 2011)
  4. Bayer HealthCare erectile dysfunction market research, conducted by the PSL Group in May/June 2006
  5. European Association of Urology. Guidelines on male sexual dysfunction 2009. Available at: http://www.uroweb.org/fileadmin/tx_eauguidelines/2009/Full/Male_Sexual_Dysf.pdf
  6. Sperling H, Debruyne F, Boermans A, et al. Efficacy and safety of an orodispersible vardenafil formulation for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in elderly men and those with underlying conditions: an integrated analysis of two pivotal trials. J Sex Med (accepted)
  7. Sperling H et al. The POTENT I randomised trial: efficacy and safety of an orodispersable vardenafil formulation for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. J Sex Med 2010;7:1497-1507
  8. Gittleman M et al. The POTENT II randomised trial: efficacy and safety of an orodispersable vardenafil formulation for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Int J Clin Pract 2010;64:594-603

Source
Bayer HealthCare



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Men Report Persistent Sexual Impairment After Use Of Common Hair Loss Drugs

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Also Included In: Dermatology;  Men’s health
Article Date: 18 Mar 2011 – 3:00 PDT

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A new study by The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, that will be published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, suggests men who take the drug finasteride, commonly marketed under the trademark names Propecia and Proscar, may report an on-going reduction in sex drive, and in some cases, prolonged periods of erectile dysfunction even after they stop using the medications.

“The study looked at the reported types and duration of persistent sexual side effects in otherwise healthy men who took finasteride for male pattern hair loss,” said Dr. Michael Irwig, Assistant Professor of Medicine. “While finasteride has been associated with reversible adverse sexual side effects in multiple randomized placebo controlled trials, this is the first series to find that symptoms persisted for at least three months despite stopping finasteride.”

Dr. Irwig conducted standardized interviews with 71 men aged 21-46 who reported they were in otherwise good health and who claimed they experienced the new onset of sexual side effects after they began finasteride. Of the men studied, 94 percent said they developed low sexual desire, 92 percent said they developed erectile dysfunction, 92 percent said they developed decreased arousal and 69 percent said they developed problems with orgasm. Men in this study reported they used finasteride for an average of 28 months and reported an average duration of persistent sexual side effects was 40 months from the time of stopping finasteride to the interview date.

Additionally, the study found the mean number of sexual episodes the survey respondents reported per month dropped, and the reported total sexual dysfunction score increased before and after finasteride use, according to the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale. Although the exact incidence of persistent sexual dysfunction is unknown, Dr. Irwig recommends that men contemplating the use of finasteride discuss the potential risk for persistent sexual side effects with their doctors.

“The study underscores the importance of physicians, who are treating male pattern hair loss, discussing the potential risk of persistent sexual side effects with their patients.”

Source:

George Washington University



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Medicare Wrongly Buys Millions Worth Of Viagra For Seniors

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Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Also Included In: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 15 Mar 2011 – 11:00 PDT

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Some seniors got lucky over the past few years and on the U.S. Government’s Health Care dime. A new report released by the Office of the Inspector General states that the U.S. Medicare program improperly spent more than $3 million in 2007 and 2008 to buy Viagra and other erectile dysfunction drugs for senior citizens. Medicare administrators blamed the spending on a software error and said they would try to recover payments to private insurers who administer the program’s drug plans.

Although the purchases were a fraction of Medicare’s drug spending in 2007 and 2008, which totaled $133 billion, Medicare paid a total of $3.1 million for erectile dysfunction drugs in the period examined. Almost all of those funds went to the purchase of the Pfizer product which had 2010 sales of $1.9 billion based on data compiled by Bloomberg.

Sildenafil citrate, sold as Viagra, Revatio and under various other trade names, is a drug used to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It acts by inhibiting cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5, an enzyme that regulates blood flow in the penis.

Since becoming available in 1998, sildenafil has been the prime treatment for erectile dysfunction. In 2000, Viagra sales accounted for 92% of the global market for prescribed erectile dysfunction pills. By 2007, Viagra’s global share had plunged to about 50% due to several factors, including the entry of Cialis and Levitra, along with several counterfeits and clones, and reports of vision loss in people taking PDE5 inhibitors.

The purchases violated a 2005 ban on covering the drugs under the U.S. health program for the elderly and disabled. Medicare “should not have covered these drugs,” George Reeb, acting deputy inspector general for audit services at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, recommended that Medicare work with the Food and Drug Administration to maintain a list of prohibited drugs.

Medicare’s administrators told the inspector general that they would fix the flaw by updating computer databases with codes for the prohibited drugs. Medicare also paid for an undetermined amount for erectile dysfunction drugs in 2009 and 2010, Reeb said.

Pfizer’s patent on sildenafil citrate expired in Brazil in 2010 and will expire in the United States in 2012.

Source: United States Office of the Inspector General

Written by Sy Kraft, B.A.


Copyright: Medical News Today

Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today



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First-Of-Its-Kind Pilot Study Using Image-Guided Neurothermal Ablation For Premature Ejaculation

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Also Included In: Medical Devices / Diagnostics
Article Date: 10 Mar 2011 – 0:00 PST

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University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center is conducting the first ever pilot study to test a new procedure using “heat therapy” or local radiofrequency energy to treat premature ejaculation. The procedure is called image-guided neurothermal modulation, referring to the energy produced by radio waves directed with a probe to modulate or lessen the sensation of a nerve.

Premature ejaculation (PE) affects 20 percent to 38 percent of men, making it the most common male sexual dysfunction worldwide. Current options available for PE treatment are limited and include oral medication, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which can have side-effects throughout the body over long-term use, topical anesthetics and/or behavioral therapies.

“We’re very excited that this is the first study of its kind in the world,” said J. David Prologo, M.D., primary investigator and UH interventional radiologist. “This is a fairly common condition for which men have limited options. If we can show that local therapy can help, it will provide an outpatient option for symptom control that has eluded men with this condition forever.”

In this novel study, patients will undergo CT imaging to guide a tiny electrode about the size of a needle to the dorsal penile nerve in the pelvis, which ultimately supplies nerve sensation to the skin of the penis. Radio waves will be intermittently transmitted through the electrode to lessen the sensation carried by the targeted nerve. The patients will be in a conscious sedation during the procedure, much like the sedation given for a colonoscopy.

UH expects to enroll its first patient in the study in early March. Twenty-two patients will be enrolled in the study to test the safety of the procedure and to see if the procedure results in the expected benefits for patients. The study is funded by Neurotherm®, in cooperation with University Hospitals Case Medical Center.

The procedure will be done on an outpatient basis and patients can go home the same day. The actual procedure only takes about 20 minutes, but there is preparation time prior to the procedure and observation time afterwards.

Dr. Prologo, who is also Assistant Professor in the Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, said that the nerve recovers over time from the procedure, so the effects of the treatment are not permanent. If the effects are beneficial, the next step for study will be permanent ablation.

Ablation is commonly used for pain control, in patients with back problems for example. In addition, the evolution and advances in image guidance have given interventional radiologists the ability to target internal structures for needle interventions with exquisite precision.

Source:
George Stamatis
University Hospitals Case Medical Center



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NSAIDs Linked To Increased Risk Of Erectile Dysfunction

Editor’s Choice
Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Also Included In: Pain / Anesthetics;  IT / Internet / E-mail;  Heart Disease
Article Date: 04 Mar 2011 – 0:00 PST

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Men who take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs three times a day for more than three months are 2.4 times more likely to have erectile dysfunction compared to men who do not take those drugs regularly, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published online in The Journal of Urology.

While previous research showed a trend toward this same finding, this observational study used electronic health records, an automated pharmacy database and self-reported questionnaire data to examine NSAID use and ED in an ethnically diverse population of 80,966 men aged 45 to 69 years throughout California.

After controlling for age, race, ethnicity, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, high cholesterol and body mass index, the researchers found that ED was 1.4 times more likely – a modest risk – among regular NSAID users compared to men who did not take the drugs regularly. This association was consistent across all age groups.

“This study is a great example of how we work to understand the safety and effectiveness of what we recommend for our patients. We went into this study thinking we would find the opposite effect: that NSAIDs would have a protective effect because they protect against heart disease, which is also linked to ED,” said study senior author Steven J. Jacobsen, MD, PhD, an epidemiologist and director of research for Kaiser Permanente Southern California. “The next step is to dive a bit deeper to understand the underlying physiology of what might be happening with these drugs.”

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem in many middle-aged and elderly men. According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 5 percent of 40-year-old men and between 15 and 25 percent of 65-year-old men experience ED on a long-term basis.

However, the researchers caution that men should not stop taking NSAIDs based on this study.

“There are many proven benefits of non steroidals in preventing heart disease and for other conditions. People shouldn’t stop taking them based on this observational study. However, if a man is taking this class of drugs and has ED, it’s worth a discussion with his doctor,” Jacobsen said.

Notes:

Study authors included: Joseph M. Gleason, MD, and Howard Jung, MD, from the Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center; Jeffrey M. Slezak, MS; Kristi Reynolds, PhD, MPH, Reina Haque, PhD, MPH, Virginia P. Quinn, PhD, MPH, and Steven J. Jacobsen, MD, PhD, with the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research Evaluation; Ronald K. Loo, MD, Kaiser Permanente Downey Medical Center; and Stephen K. Van Den Eeden, PhD with the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research.

Source:
Kaiser Permanente

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Cannabis Use Linked To Male Sexual Dysfunction

Editor’s Choice
Main Category: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs
Also Included In: Men’s health;  Sexual Health / STDs;  Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Article Date: 24 Feb 2011 – 0:00 PST

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Rany Shamloul’s recent review of the medical literature on cannabis use and sexual health has revealed that cannabis use may negatively impact male sexual performance.

“Cannabis is the most widely-used illicit drug globally,” says Dr. Shamloul, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. “It is also often used by young, sexually active people who are unaware of the hazardous effects it may be having on their sexual health and performance.”

Recent animal and in vitro studies have identified new negative connections between cannabis use and sexual dysfunction that may put an end to previous controversy.

While it was previously known that cannabis could affect certain receptors in the brain, it’s now believed that these receptors also exist in the penis. Cannabis use may have an antagonizing effect on these receptors in the penis, making it more difficult for a man to achieve and maintain an erection.

“These findings will change the current understanding of the magnitude of the impact of cannabis use on sexual health,” says Dr. Shamloul.

Previous studies examining the effects of cannabis use on male sexual function have been limited and many of these studies have produced contradictory results. While some studies have indicated cannabis could have beneficial effects in enhancing erectile function, other studies have found the opposite.

Dr. Shamloul’s research will appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Source:
Queen’s University

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Utter Hogwash

posted by Mike on 24 Feb 2011 at 1:47 am

As a habitual cannabis user for over 20 years i can confidently say that this article is full of it.

As “he most widely-used illicit drug globally” any negative effects of this kind would have been recognized long before now, mainly due to the fact that human have been using the substance for thousands of years.

And if it does effect sexual performance (not that i’ve noticed) isn’t that precisely why we have the “little blue pill”?

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