Breast Cancer: Are Yearly Mammograms Worthwhile?

woman having mammogram

Nov. 21, 2012 — Women over age 40 are often urged to get yearly mammograms with the promise that early detection is their best hope for beating breast cancer.

But a new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine suggests that mammograms may not save as many lives as doctors once thought.

The study also finds that the tests may be responsible for substantial harm, causing an estimated 1.3 million women in the U.S. over the last 30 years to be treated for breast cancers that would not have caused clinical symptoms.

Statistical Image Analysis Method Offers Automatic Mitotic Cell Detection For Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Main Category: Breast Cancer
Also Included In: Medical Devices / Diagnostics;  Cancer / Oncology
Article Date: 14 Nov 2012 – 1:00 PST

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Statistical Image Analysis Method Offers Automatic Mitotic Cell Detection For Breast Cancer Diagnosis

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Scientists have developed a statistical image analysis method which can assist in the grading of breast cancer by automatically segmenting tumour regions and detecting dividing cells in tissue samples.

The system, developed at the University of Warwick, promises to bring objectivity and automation to the cancer grading process which is used to determine the aggressiveness of the treatment offered to the patient.

African-American Women: Breast Cancer More Deadly?

woman looking at mammogram machine

Oct. 28, 2012 — African-American women may be more likely to die of breast cancer than women of other races, especially in the first few years after the diagnosis, according to new research.

As to why, there are no clear answers yet, but the emphasis on vigilant care is clear for African-American women.

“Black women were almost 50% more likely to die compared to white women within the first three years since breast cancer was diagnosed,” says researcher Erica Warner, ScD, MPH, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health.

New Clue to Predict Diseases in Women?

mature woman

Oct. 9, 2012 — Evaluating blood levels of a hormone made in the brain and the gut may help predict diseases in women, according to new research.

High levels of the hormone neurotensin appear linked to women’s risk of diabetes, breast cancer, and cardiovascular disease such as heart disease or stroke, according to Swedish researchers.

The researchers looked at levels of a substance called proneurotensin. It turns into neurotensin.

“Proneurotensin is the first blood biomarker ever that can independently identify elevated risk of three major disease threats to women’s health,” says Olle Melander, MD, PhD, professor of internal medicine at Lund University in Malmo, Sweden. He led the study.

Improved Treatment Outcomes With Preoperative Needle Breast Biopsies

Main Category: Breast Cancer
Also Included In: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP;  Public Health
Article Date: 04 Oct 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Improved Treatment Outcomes With Preoperative Needle Breast Biopsies

Women suspected of having breast cancer now have more reasons to be diagnosed with a needle biopsy instead of a traditional open surgical biopsy. Besides avoiding the risks and discomfort of an open surgical procedure, needle biopsies can also lead to improved treatment outcomes according to findings from a new study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Genetic Researchers Find New, Low-Cost Approach For Ovarian And Breast Cancer Testing

Main Category: Ovarian Cancer
Also Included In: Breast Cancer;  Medical Devices / Diagnostics;  Genetics
Article Date: 29 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Genetic Researchers Find New, Low-Cost Approach For Ovarian And Breast Cancer Testing

In a new genetic study, researchers said they may have found a way to cut the cost of genetic screening for breast and ovarian cancers from $3000 to $400.

Three teams of infertility scientists in New York and Austria collaborated to study gene mutations that increase a woman’s likelihood of breast and ovarian cancers. In the process, they made a discovery that could reduce to the cost of breast and ovarian cancer screening, making diagnosis more widely available to women in need.