Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay Young

News Picture: Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay YoungBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Alzheimer’s and dementia are not an inevitable part of normal aging, and a little exercise might help keep them at bay, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that every hour of light exercise on top of recommended weekly levels of more intense activity reduced brain aging by about a year.

“This study emphasizes the relationship we are seeing between people doing more light-intensity physical activity and also having maintained brain structures,” said lead researcher Nicole Spartano.

Health Tip: Improving Your Memory

(HealthDay News) — Memory loss is common, but should not be taken lightly, says Mayo Clinic. If you have difficulty remembering things, Mayo Clinic offers a few simple ways to sharpen your memory:

  • Stay physically and mentally active.
  • Socialize often.
  • Stay organized.
  • Sleep well.
  • Eat healthy.
  • Manage chronic conditions.

Latest Alzheimer’s News

If memory loss affects your ability to complete your daily activities, or if you notice it getting worse, talk with your doctor.

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Destination Limbo: Health Suffers Among Asylum Seekers In Crowded Border Shelter

Immigrants from Mexico and Central America seeking asylum in the United States frequently end up at border shelters in Tijuana, Mexico. They stay in them for weeks as they wait for the U.S. government to approve or deny their applications.

Most of the refugees get sick during their journeys due to insufficient food, a lack of clean water and poor sanitation at camps and shelters along the way. But perhaps their biggest health problem is depression and anxiety: They have suffered violence and been threatened by gangs and left behind everything they know in the world.

Voice analysis software may help diagnose PTSD in veterans

(Reuters Health) – Voice analysis software can help detect post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans based on their speech, a study suggests.

Doctors have long understood that people with psychiatric disorders may speak differently than individuals who do not have mental health problems, researchers note in Depression and Anxiety. While some previous research points to the potential for distinct speech patterns among people with PTSD, it’s been unclear whether depression that often accompanies PTSD might explain the unique voice characteristics.

In the current study, voice analysis software detected which veterans had PTSD and which ones did not with 89 percent accuracy.

Medicare hospital fund reserves likely to be exhausted in 2026: U.S. report

(Reuters) – Medicare’s hospital insurance fund will be depleted in 2026, as previously forecast, and Social Security program costs are likely to exceed total income in 2020 for the first time since 1982, according to a government report released on Monday.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Seema Verma (C) is joined by Concerned Women for America CEO Penny Nance (L) at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

Celebrate Earth Day—Medicare style!

More than 190 countries celebrate Earth Day on April 22—a day for encouraging awareness and action to help protect our environment. How can you make your voice heard this year? Let Medicare help! Sign up for a MyMedicare.gov account and take advantage of Medicare’s electronic resources to help you manage your health care and get rid of unnecessary paper.

Get your “Medicare & You” handbook electronically

Liver Illness Strikes Latino Children Like A ‘Silent Tsunami’

Saira Diaz uses her fingers to count the establishments selling fast food and sweets near the South Los Angeles home she shares with her parents and 13-year-old son. “There’s one, two, three, four, five fast-food restaurants,” she says. “And a little mom and pop store that sells snacks and sodas and candy.”

In that low-income, predominantly Latino neighborhood, it’s pretty hard for a kid to avoid sugar. Last year, doctors at St. John’s Well Child and Family Center, a nonprofit community clinic seven blocks away, became alarmed by the rising weight of Diaz’s son, Adrian Mejia. They persuaded him to join an intervention study run by the University of Southern California and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) that weans participants off sugar in an effort to reduce the rate of obesity and diabetes among children.

China finds more cases of African swine fever on Hainan island

BEIJING (Reuters) – China has detected new cases of African swine fever in six farms across four locations in Hainan province, the agriculture ministry said on Sunday, adding to two earlier cases of the contagious disease identified in the province on Friday.

The disease, which is fatal to pigs but harmless in humans, has spread to every province on the Chinese mainland since its initial detection in August 2018.

Authorities previously said they hoped the disease would not spread to Hainan, an island located off China’s southern coast.

Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ You Have Questions, We Have Answers

This week, KHN’s “What the Health?” panelists answered questions submitted by listeners.

Among the topics covered were what might happen to parts of the Affordable Care Act if a lawsuit now working its way through the courts succeeds in declaring the health law unconstitutional, and how Medicare and Medicaid deal with surprise medical bills from out-of-network providers.

This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Jennifer Haberkorn of the Los Angeles Times, Joanne Kenen of Politico and Kimberly Leonard of the Washington Examiner.

The panel addressed questions including the following:

China draws up tighter rules on human gene and embryo trials: Xinhua

FILE PHOTO: A student at Ayi University, a training program for domestic helpers, practices on a baby doll during a course teaching childcare in Beijing, China December 5, 2018. REUTERS/Thomas Peter/File Photo

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s top legislature will consider tougher rules on research involving human genes and embryos, the first such move since a Chinese scientist sparked controversy last year by announcing he had made the world’s first “gene-edited” babies.

He Jiankui, associate professor at Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen, attracted condemnation from the global scientific community when he said he had used a technology known as CRISPR-Cas9 to alter the embryonic genes of twin girls born in November.