Jardiance Wins CV Prevention Indication

WASHINGTON — The diabetes drug empagliflozin (Jardiance) may be marketed for prevention of cardiovascular death in patients with type 2 diabetes and co-existing cardiovascular disease, the FDA said Friday.

It’s the first such claim ever allowed for a diabetes drug.

Empagliflozin, first approved in 2014, is an inhibitor of the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) pathway, reducing blood glucose by causing it to be excreted in urine.

Its benefit for cardiovascular risk reduction was demonstrated in the so-called EMPA-REG trial, results of which were reported in 2015.

Stop the flu before it starts

Flu season is back, which means it’s time to protect yourself and loved ones by getting a free flu shot.

Flu viruses change from year to year, so it’s important to get a flu shot each flu season. It’s free for people with Medicare, once per flu season when you get it by doctors or other health care providers (like senior centers and pharmacies) that take Medicare.

National Influenza Vaccination Week is December 4–10. You can stop the flu before it stops you.

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Study reveals new way to improve stability of common protein drugs

Gaining access to important biopharmaceuticals needed to treat illnesses and autoimmune diseases is one of the biggest obstacles developing countries face. Costs can be astronomical where these medications are needed most, and when doctors are able to acquire those medications they face another challenge – time. Drugs are perishable and some require refrigeration, which can be difficult to provide in the world’s poorest regions.

New data on risk vs benefit for potent CAR-T cancer drugs

By Deena Beasley

A promising but risky new group of customized cancer drugs will be in focus this weekend at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), where clinical trial results will help clarify their potential for doctors and investors.

Experimental chimeric antigen receptor T-cells, or CAR-Ts, are made by genetically altering a patients’ own T-cells in the lab to help the immune system find and kill cancer cells. The altered cells are then infused back into the patient.

Cornell researchers develop chemical probe activated by UV light to control inflammation

Black light does more than make posters glow. Cornell researchers have developed a chemical tool to control inflammation that is activated by ultraviolet (UV) light.

The method will allow scientists to study inflammation and the immune system, and may one day prove effective as a targeted therapy for inflammatory diseases, while minimizing side effects to healthy tissues.

The researchers, who reported their results in a study published in October in the journal Chemical Science, designed a small molecule that is capable of controlling an immune response when exposed to UV light radiation.

'Patients at risk' from length of GP consultations

‘Patients at risk’ from length of GP consultations

  • 29 August 2016
  • From the section Health
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Science Photo Library

Do Your Part for the Environment—Go Paperless!

On June 5, more than 100 countries worldwide will be celebrating World Environment Day—a day for encouraging awareness and action for the environment. How can you do your part to help the environment?  One great way is to sign up to get your “Medicare & You” handbook electronically.

If you have an eReader (like an iPad, Surface, or Kindle Fire) you can download a free digital version of the “Medicare & You” handbook to your eReader and take it with you anywhere you go.

'Concerning' variation in birth care

Birth care variation in hospitals in England ‘concerning’

  • 23 March 2016
  • From the section Health

A midwife talking to a pregnant womanImage copyright
PA

The variation in care women get when giving birth in hospital in England is concerning, experts say.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists’ warning follows a review of more than 550,000 births.

It found “substantial variation” in practice between maternity units, and said this may suggest not all women get the best possible care.

Ministers said the NHS was a safe place to give birth but the report would help it improve.

Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have solved the atomic structure of a unique ubiquitin ligase complex. Ubiquitin is best known for its role in protein degradation, but more recently seen as important for cell signaling, DNA repair, anti-inflammatory, and immune responses.

The study, published today in Nature, opens the door for developing a novel class of drug targets for cancer as well as inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and psoriasis.