Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay Young

News Picture: Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay YoungBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Alzheimer’s and dementia are not an inevitable part of normal aging, and a little exercise might help keep them at bay, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that every hour of light exercise on top of recommended weekly levels of more intense activity reduced brain aging by about a year.

“This study emphasizes the relationship we are seeing between people doing more light-intensity physical activity and also having maintained brain structures,” said lead researcher Nicole Spartano.

Health Tip: Improving Your Memory

(HealthDay News) — Memory loss is common, but should not be taken lightly, says Mayo Clinic. If you have difficulty remembering things, Mayo Clinic offers a few simple ways to sharpen your memory:

  • Stay physically and mentally active.
  • Socialize often.
  • Stay organized.
  • Sleep well.
  • Eat healthy.
  • Manage chronic conditions.

Latest Alzheimer’s News

If memory loss affects your ability to complete your daily activities, or if you notice it getting worse, talk with your doctor.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Visit the Source Site

Powered by WPeMatico

Financial Scammers Often Prey on People With Early Dementia

News Picture: Financial Scammers Often Prey on People With Early DementiaBy Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — When older adults fall prey to scam artists, it might in some cases be an early warning of Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests.

The study of 935 older adults found that those who appeared susceptible to scams were at higher risk of mental decline over the next six years. Compared with their more skeptical peers, they were 47% more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment — problems with memory and thinking that can progress to dementia.

And they were typically twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

More Alzheimer’s Drug Trial Failures: Are Researchers on the Wrong Track?

News Picture: More Alzheimer's Drug Trial Failures: Are Researchers on the Wrong Track?By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Amyloid beta has long been a prime suspect in Alzheimer’s disease, since abnormal levels of the protein form disruptive plaques between patients’ brain cells.

But drug trials aimed at lowering amyloid levels have repeatedly failed to save people’s brains, and some researchers now believe the focus needs to shift to other potential culprits.

Researchers pulled the plug early on the latest failed clinical trial, after patients’ brain power continued to decline even though the amyloid beta blocker verubecestat successfully lowered amyloid levels in their brains and spinal fluid.

Brain Scans Spot, Track Alzheimer’s

News Picture: Brain Scans Spot, Track Alzheimer's

Latest Alzheimer’s News

TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Brain scans can improve diagnosis and management of Alzheimer’s disease, a new study claims.

Researchers assessed the use of PET scans to identify Alzheimer’s-related amyloid plaques in the brain. The study included more than 11,000 Medicare beneficiaries with mild thinking impairment or dementia of uncertain cause.

This scanning technique changed the diagnosis of the cause of mental impairment in more than one-third of the participants in the study.

Only Spoken Words Processed in Newly Discovered Brain Region

News Picture: Only Spoken Words Processed in Newly Discovered Brain Region

Latest Alzheimer’s News

WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A dementia study has led researchers to a brain region that processes spoken, not written, words.

Northwestern University researchers worked with four patients who had a rare type of dementia called primary progressive aphasia (PPA), which destroys language.

Although able to hear and speak, they could not understand what was said out loud. However, they could still process written words. For example, if they read the word “hippopotamus,” they could identify a picture of a hippo. But if someone said the word “hippopotamus,” they couldn’t point to its picture.

memantine (Namenda)

What is memantine, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

  • Memantine is an oral medication for treating patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Other medications used for Alzheimer’s disease affect acetylcholine, one of the neurotransmitter chemicals that nerve cells in the brain use to communicate with one another. These drugs – galantamine (Razadyne – formerly known as Reminyl), donezepil (Aricept), rivastigmine (Exelon), and tacrine (Cognex) – inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase that destroys acetylcholine and thereby increase the effects of acetylcholine.

Even Distant Relatives’ History Could Up Your Alzheimer’s Risk

News Picture: Even Distant Relatives' History Could Up Your Alzheimer's RiskBy Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A grandparent’s mental decline or a great uncle’s waning memory may indicate you, too, have greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease — especially if closer relatives have the condition, a new study says.

Alzheimer’s in both a first-degree relative (parents, siblings) and a second-degree relative (grandparent, aunt, uncle, nieces or nephews) doubles your risk of the brain-destroying disorder, researchers found. But if you have one first-degree relative and two second-degree relatives with the disease, your risk increases by 21 times.

Rate of U.S. Deaths Tied to Dementia Has More Than Doubled

News Picture: Rate of U.S. Deaths Tied to Dementia Has More Than DoubledBy Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Dementia is now one of the leading killers in the United States, with the rate of deaths linked to the disease more than doubling over the past two decades.

“Overall, age-adjusted death rates for dementia increased from 30.5 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 66.7 in 2017,” say a team of researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In sheer numbers, the new analysis of death certificate data shows that dementia was noted as the primary cause for nearly 262,000 deaths in 2017, with 46 percent of those deaths due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Dementia May Strike Differently, Depending on Race

News Picture: Dementia May Strike Differently, Depending on RaceBy Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Dementia appears to strike people of different races in different ways, brain autopsies have revealed.

Hispanic and black people are more likely to suffer from dementia that’s caused in part by micro-strokes or hardening of the arteries that serve the brain, researchers report.

On the other hand, whites are more likely to have dementia caused by “pure” Alzheimer’s disease, in which abnormalities like protein plaques and tangles damage the ability of brain cells to communicate with each other, said study co-author Brittany Dugger. She’s an assistant professor with the University of California, Davis, Alzheimer’s Disease Center.