New Results for Experimental Alzheimer’s Drug

Latest Alzheimer’s News

FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — New study results about an experimental drug its maker claims can slow mental decline in Alzheimer’s disease patients were released Thursday.

Studies on aducanumab were halted earlier this year because the drug didn’t appear to be effective. But the new results suggest it’s effective at a high dose, the Associated Press reported.

The findings were presented at an Alzheimer’s conference in San Diego.

However, some experts say that changes during the study and unusual analyses make the results difficult to interpret and the risks and benefits of the drug unclear, the AP reported.

How Well Are You Aging? A Blood Test Might Tell

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News Picture: How Well Are You Aging? A Blood Test Might Tell

THURSDAY, Dec. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Imagine a blood test that could spot whether you are aging too quickly.

New research suggests it’s not the stuff of science fiction anymore.

The scientists analyzed plasma — the cell-free, fluid part of blood — from more than 4,200 people between the ages of 18 and 95, and found a link between 373 proteins and aging.

“We’ve known for a long time that measuring certain proteins in the blood can give you information about a person’s health status — lipoproteins for cardiovascular health, for example,” said study senior author Tony Wyss-Coray. He’s co-director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Stanford University in California.

Ski Your Way to a Healthier Aging Brain

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News Picture: Ski Your Way to a Healthier Aging Brain

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Cross-country skiing may be good for your brain, a new study suggests.

Previous research found that participants of the Vasaloppet, a popular long-distance, cross-country skiing race in Sweden, have a lower risk of heart attack, but potential brain benefits have been unclear.

This new research compared the brain health of about 200,000 who took part in the Vasaloppet between 1989 and 2010 and a control group from the general population.

Compared with the control group, 50% fewer skiers developed vascular dementia over two decades, the study found. (Vascular dementia is caused by a series of small strokes.)

Cards, Board Games Could Be a Win for Aging Brains

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News Picture: Cards, Board Games Could Be a Win for Aging BrainsBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Dec. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Playing cards and board games like chess, bingo and Scrabble might be the mental workout you need to keep your wits as you age, Scottish researchers suggest.

People in their 70s who regularly play board games score higher on tests of memory and thinking skills than those who don’t. And 70-somethings who step up their game-playing are more likely to maintain thinking skills as they age, researchers say.

Can Air Pollution Take a Toll on Your Memory?

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News Picture: Can Air Pollution Take a Toll on Your Memory?

MONDAY, Nov. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Air pollution may trigger Alzheimer’s-like brain changes and speed memory decline in older adults, a new study suggests.

Previous research has implied that exposure to fine particle air pollution increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia, but it wasn’t clear how this type of pollution affects the brain and memory.

“This is the first study to really show, in a statistical model, that air pollution was associated with changes in people’s brains and that those changes were then connected with declines in memory performance,” said researcher Andrew Petkus. He’s an assistant professor of clinical neurology at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine.

AHA News: Obesity, Other Factors May Speed Up Brain Aging

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News Picture: AHA News: Obesity, Other Factors May Speed Up Brain Aging

THURSDAY, Nov. 21, 2019 (American Heart Association News) — The brains of middle-age adults may be aging prematurely if they have obesity or other factors linked to cardiovascular disease, new research has found.

Almost one-quarter of adults have metabolic syndrome, a set of factors that in combination amplify a person’s risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke and other illnesses. In the new research, participants were considered metabolically unhealthy if they had two or more such factors: high blood pressure; high blood sugar; high blood triglyceride levels; or low levels of HDL, the “good” cholesterol – or if they took medicine for diabetes, high blood pressure or cholesterol.

Statins Won’t Harm Aging Brains, and May Even Help

News Picture: Statins Won't Harm Aging Brains, and May Even HelpBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

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MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Concerns that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can impair brain health appear to be unfounded, according to new research.

“Statins won’t make you stupid or cause memory loss,” said lead researcher Dr. Katherine Samaras, a professor of medicine at St. Vincent’s Clinical School of Medicine in Darlinghurst, Australia.

And for some people at risk of dementia, statins like Lipitor (atorvastatin) and Crestor (rosuvastatin) may improve memory and mental functioning, her team found.

Almost Half of Older Americans Fear Dementia, Try Untested Ways to Fight It

News Picture: Almost Half of Older Americans Fear Dementia, Try Untested Ways to Fight ItBy Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

FRIDAY, Nov. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Many Americans believe they are likely to develop dementia — and they often turn to unproven ways to try to better their odds, a new study suggests.

In a survey, researchers found that almost half of Americans in their 50s and 60s believed they were at least “somewhat likely” to develop dementia. Yet few — 5% — said they had talked to their doctor about ways to lower their risk.

People Who Can’t Read Face 2-3 Times Higher Dementia Risk

News Picture: People Who Can't Read Face 2-3 Times Higher Dementia RiskBy Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Could illiteracy up your odds for dementia?

That’s the suggestion of a study that found seniors who couldn’t read or write were two to three times more likely to develop dementia than those who could.

The finding “provides strong evidence for a link between illiteracy and dementia risk,” said study author Jennifer Manly, a professor of neuropsychology at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.

The finding also offers sobering insight into how dementia risk could be disproportionately affecting the roughly 32 million illiterate adults in the United States.

AHA News: Omega-3 May Boost Brain Health in People With a Common Heart Disease

News Picture: AHA News: Omega-3 May Boost Brain Health in People With a Common Heart Disease

Latest Alzheimer’s News

TUESDAY, Nov. 12, 2019 (American Heart Association News) — Omega-3 fatty acids have drawn attention for their potential to keep people’s thinking sharp as they age, and new research appears to support that notion for some heart patients.

The study found taking omega-3 fatty acid supplements was associated with better brain function in people with coronary artery disease, which increases risk for dementia.

The study included 250 people with coronary artery disease. For 30 months, half took omega-3 supplements; the other half served as a control group. The group taking the supplements had better coordination, reaction speed, memory and recall at one year and at 30 months, compared to the control group.