Researchers examine link between OSA and inflammation, organ damage

Understanding mechanisms of apnea-related inflammation could lead to more precise treatments, improved outcomes for total health

Voyagers no longer embark in search of the storied Fountain of Youth, but the quest for longevity is still very much alive for researchers.

“Aging has become the next frontier in medicine,” said renowned sleep specialist David Gozal, MD, chair of the Department of Child Health at the University of Missouri School of Medicine.

Watchful waiting in prostate cancer becoming more popular

In 2010, the US National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines suggested that patients with stable and low-risk prostate cancers could be managed with active surveillance or watchful waiting (AS/WW). AS/WW was considered to be a safe and effective alternative to aggressive surgery to remove the prostate and radiation therapy.

A new study looked at the trends in management of prostate cancer between 2010 and 2015 and found that this trend of AS/WW has indeed caught up with the treating doctors. The study results from researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, appeared in the latest issue of the journal JAMA.

Researchers use modified type of flu virus to develop new therapies for prostate cancer

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have received a grant from leading men’s health charity, Prostate Cancer UK, as London continues to lead the way in advanced prostate cancer research.

Six separate grants worth over £2.5 million have been awarded in London as part of the charity’s Research Innovation Awards scheme which funds forward thinking, ambitious research proposals from across the UK which challenge the status quo.

Dr Gunnel Hallden is leading one of the pioneering studies at Queen Mary. It builds on previous work funded by Prostate Cancer UK, which saw Dr Hallden develop a modified type of flu virus that specifically infects and kills cancer cells, leaving non-cancer cells unharmed.

African Americans who smoke cigarettes are more likely to develop peripheral artery disease

African Americans who smoke cigarettes are more likely than those who don’t smoke to develop peripheral artery disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a narrowing of arteries other then those directly serving the heart. These blood vessels provide blood flow to the arms, legs, the brain and other organs such as the kidneys. If this blood flow is reduced, stroke, kidney failure, erectile dysfunction, pain in the legs when walking and even loss of limbs can occur. PAD is associated with several heart disease risk factors including hypertension, diabetes and obesity.

Health care industry spends $30b a year pushing its wares, from drugs to stem cell treatment

Hoping to earn its share of the $3.5 trillion health care market, the medical industry is pouring more money than ever into advertising its products — from high-priced prescriptions to do-it-yourself genetic tests and unapproved stem cell treatments.

Spending on health care marketing doubled from 1997 to 2016, soaring to at least $30 billion a year, according to a study published Tuesday in JAMA.

“Marketing drives more testing. It drives more treatments. It’s a big part of why health care is so expensive, because it’s the fancy, high-tech stuff things that get marketed,” said Steven Woloshin, co-director of the Center for Medicine and Media at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. His study captured only a portion of the many ways that drug companies, hospitals and labs promote themselves.

Anabolic steroids may increase risk of early death in men

Men who use androgenic anabolic steroids—such as testosterone—may face a higher risk of early death and of experiencing more hospital admissions, according to a new Journal of Internal Medicine study.

For the study, 545 men who used androgenic anabolic steroids were matched with 5,450 controls. In addition, 644 men who were sanctioned because they refused to submit to a doping test and 6440 controls were included as a replication cohort.

Drugmakers funnel millions to lawmakers; a few dozen get $100,000-plus

A new Kaiser Health News database tracks campaign donations from drugmakers over the past 10 years.

Before the midterm elections heated up, dozens of drugmakers had already poured about $12 million into the war chests of hundreds of members of Congress.

Since the beginning of last year, 34 lawmakers have each received more than $100,000 from pharmaceutical companies. Two of those — Reps. Greg Walden of Oregon, a key Republican committee chairman, and Kevin McCarthy of California, the House Republican majority leader — each received more than $200,000, a new Kaiser Health News database shows.

First genetic risk factor for erectile dysfunction identified

For the first time, a team of researchers has found a specific place in the human genome that raises a person’s risk of erectile dysfunction. The discovery is a significant advancement in the understanding of the genetics underlying erectile dysfunction.
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