Antibiotic use linked to increased odds of developing rheumatoid arthritis

Aug 26 2019

A new study has provided evidence that antibiotic usage is associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

Researchers from Keele University and the Quadram Institute analyzed data from primary care medical records. They found that the odds of developing rheumatoid arthritis were 60% higher in those exposed to antibiotics than in those not exposed.  

The odds increased with the number of antibiotics treatments, and how recently they were taken.

Combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis may lead to higher remission rates

Researchers at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and RTI International (RTI), a nonprofit research institute, recently found that patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may see less disease activity and higher remission rates after biologic therapy plus methotrexate (MTX) rather than either treatment alone.

The results of their systematic review have been published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

RA is an autoimmune disease affecting more than 1 million people in the United States. It is characterized by joint inflammation, which can lead to progressive bone erosion, joint damage, and disability. Current guidelines recommend early treatment for RA patients, with the goal of remission. “Early” is usually defined as the first year of the condition, which is also how it was defined for the systematic review.

Type 1 diabetes linked to gut microbiome and genetic factors

A new study from Lingköping University in Sweden and the University of Florida has revealed that the gut microbiome of children with a high genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes is markedly different from children who have a low risk of developing the condition.

Gut microbiomeJuan Gaertner | Shutterstock

The new study suggests that an individual’s response to environmental factors that contribute to the development type 1 diabetes is influenced by genetic factors, and claims it is the first to report significant associations between genetic risk and changes in the gut microbiome.

Genetic risk for autoimmunity may be linked to differences in gut microbiome

Children with increased genetic risk of type 1 diabetes have different gut microbiomes than those with low risk, a new study found.

A team of researchers at the Linköping University in Sweden and the University of Florida in the United States found that the genetic risk for developing type 1 diabetes autoimmunity is associated with distinct changes in the gut microbiome.

Gut bacteria, microbiome. Bacteria inside the large intestine, concept, representation. 3D illustration. Credit: Anatomy Insider / Shutterstock

Gut bacteria, microbiome. Bacteria inside the large intestine, concept, representation. 3D illustration. Credit: Anatomy Insider / Shutterstock

Genetic risk for type 1 diabetes linked with distinct changes in gut microbiome

Children with a high genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes have different gut microbiomes than children with a low risk, according to a new study from Linköping University in Sweden and the University of Florida in the US. The results published in the scientific journal Nature Communications suggest that genetic risk can shape an individual’s response to environmental factors in the development of autoimmune diseases.

Antibody target implicated in neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus discovered

Aug 13 2019

Researchers have identified a specific target of antibodies that are implicated in the neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus, according to human research published in JNeurosci.

Antibody target implicated in neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus discovered

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Brain cytoplasmic RNAs are pieces of genetic code that neurons use to regulate how proteins are made. They contain sections that code for where the proteins should be transported in the neuron — the synapse. In lupus, this type of RNA is thought to be the target of an autoimmune response gone awry, but the specific mechanism is unknown.

Diagnostic value of ultrasound in comparing different types of arthritis

Ultrasound is a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive means of diagnosing a number of medical conditions. This review presents an analysis of the diagnostic value of ultrasound to draw comparison between different types of arthritic conditions. The 7 major arthritic conditions included in this study are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, pseudogout (calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease), psoriatic arthritis, infectious arthritis and spondyloarthritis.

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In this review, researchers at SouthWest Medical University, China have conducted a computerized literature search in Pubmed and identified a list of 206 publications related to arthritis. Out of this list, a total of 52 studies out of those met the search criteria for involving diagnostic ultrasonography.

New technology uses immune system to deliver drugs directly to infection sites

A researcher at Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane has developed a new technology that harnesses the immune system to deliver drugs directly to infection sites within the body.

Most diseases develop in local tissues within the body. That makes drug delivery challenging, because many drugs don’t have targeting properties–they simply go wherever they go. By delivering drugs to the disease site specifically, we can improve treatment while dramatically decreasing side effects.”

Zhenjia Wang, Associate Professor, WSU College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences