New study shows genes can predict response to arthritis treatment and paves the way for future drug development

New research has shown that molecular profiling of the diseased joint tissue can significantly impact whether specific drug treatments will work to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The researchers also identified specific genes associated with resistance to most available drugs therapies, commonly referred to as refractory disease, which could provide the key to developing new, successful drugs to help these people.
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Predicting the progression of rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers evaluated the ability of a polygenic risk score constructed from a genome-wide association study of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility to predict radiographic progression, which is indicative of structural joint damage in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. The research team identified an association between the polygenic risk score and radiographic progression, an observation that was pronounced in people with a younger age of onset of rheumatoid arthritis.
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Scientists discover link between gut microbiota and chronic inflammatory diseases like arthritis

An international research team has established a link between gut microbiota and chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. The team has discovered that a protein naturally present in the gut acts on the microbiota and causes the formation of molecules that exacerbate the symptoms of these diseases.
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Gallic acid and stretching decrease osteoarthritis markers in cartilage cells

Researchers used gallic acid, an antioxidant found in gallnuts, green tea and other plants, and applied a stretching mechanism to human cartilage cells taken from arthritic knees that mimics the stretching that occurs when walking. The combination not only decreased arthritis inflammation markers in the cells but improved the production of desired proteins normally found in healthy cartilage. While still at an early stage, the findings suggest a new procedure could be developed to treat cartilage cells extracted from a patient to grow a supply of cells or a tissue to be re-implanted.
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