Japan PM Abe seeks citizens’ help in coronavirus fight as Olympics to go ahead

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Saturday called on the public to cooperate in a “tough battle” to contain the coronavirus outbreak in coming weeks as the country prepares to hold the Olympic Games in Tokyo as planned.

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attends a news conference on coronavirus at his official residence in Tokyo, Japan February 29, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato

“To be frank, we cannot win this battle through the efforts of the government alone,” Abe told a news conference two days after calling for all schools nationwide to be closed for more than a month. The abrupt decision caught teachers, parents and their employers off guard, sparking a fresh wave of criticism.

Global downturn looms as countries struggle to contain coronavirus outbreak

GENEVA/BEIJING (Reuters) – The coronavirus spread further on Friday, with cases reported for the first time in at least six countries across four continents, battering markets and leading the World Health Organization (WHO) to raise its impact risk alert to “very high.”

Hopes that the epidemic that started in China late last year would be over in months, and that economic activity would quickly return to normal, have been shattered.

World shares were on course for their largest weekly fall since the 2008 financial crisis, bringing the global wipeout to $5 trillion as supply chains were disrupted, travel plans postponed and major events canceled. [MKTS/GLOB]

Mixed messages, test delays hamper U.S. coronavirus response

(Reuters) – Even as U.S. officials warn of an inevitable outbreak of coronavirus in the United States, and are alerting Americans to take precautions, some health agencies charged with protecting the public appear unprepared to deal with the threat.

FILE PHOTO: A standard dust & particle mask, and an N95 medical respirator mask (bottom), that are part of personal protection and survival equipment kits ordered by customers preparing against novel coronavirus, are seen at Nitro-Pak in Midway, Utah, U.S. February 27, 2020. REUTERS/George Frey

A small Delhi hospital overwhelmed by wave of violence

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – As deadly violence erupted in the northeast of New Delhi this week, with armed mobs rampaging the streets, a small hospital located in a densely packed Muslim neighborhood found itself at the epicenter of the unrest.

A Muslim man is treated at Al-Hind hospital after he was injured in a clash between people demonstrating for and against a new citizenship law in a riot affected area in New Delhi, India February 27, 2020. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis

Al-Hind Hospital, in the riot-torn Mustafabad neighborhood, was flooded with patients this week, and it has also become a place of refuge for people whose homes were burned or destroyed.

Losing a Spouse Could Speed Brain’s Decline

Latest Alzheimer’s News

News Picture: Losing a Spouse Could Speed Brain's DeclineBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Losing a spouse can be a heartbreaker, and new research suggests it’s also tough on the brain.

The study found that when a husband or wife dies, the surviving mate’s mental acuity could start to decline.

In fact, people who are widowed and have high levels of beta-amyloid plaque, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, appear to experience cognitive decline three times faster than similar people who have not lost a spouse, the researchers added.

New immune cell with ‘Jekyll and Hyde properties’ identified

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have identified a rare, new cell in the immune system with “Jekyll and Hyde properties”. These cells play a key protective role in immunity to infection but – if unregulated – also mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disorders.

The findings should help us design more effective vaccines to prevent infections such as MRSA, and may also assist help us develop of new therapies for autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis.

Your School Assignment For The Day: Spelling And Specs

DELANO, Calif. — Daisy Leon struggles to sit still and read the letters on the eye chart. Her responses tumble out in a quiet, confused garble.

“You know your letters?” asks optometrist Jolly Mamauag-Camat. “Umm, ya,” says Daisy, almost inaudibly.

The 6-year-old kindergartner had her eyes examined for the first time on a recent Thursday morning. Although she hadn’t complained about headaches or blurry vision, her grandmother noticed she’d been inching closer to watch television.

After Daisy’s failed attempts at reading the eye chart, Mamauag-Camat inspects the little girl’s eyes through a phoropter and writes her a prescription for glasses.

WHO warns against ‘fatal’ complacency in global coronavirus fight

GENEVA/DUBAI (Reuters) – No country should make the “fatal mistake” of assuming it will be spared the coronavirus, the World Health Organization said on Thursday, as governments from Iran to Australia raced to contain the epidemic’s rapid global spread.

With new infections reported around the world now surpassing those in mainland China, WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said even rich nations should prepare for surprises.

“No country should assume it won’t get cases, that would be a fatal mistake, quite literally,” Tedros said, pointing to Italy, where authorities said three more people had died, bringing the toll from Europe’s worst outbreak of the illness to 17. Confirmed cases there rose to 650.

Kuwait has 43 confirmed cases of coronavirus: health ministry

FILE PHOTO: A Kuwaiti boy wears a protective face mask, following the outbreak of the new coronavirus, as he throws water at passing cars, during celebrations for the 29th Kuwait Liberation Day from the Iraqi occupation, in Kuwait City, February 26, 2020. REUTERS/Stephanie McGehee

DUBAI (Reuters) – Kuwait now has 43 confirmed cases of coronavirus, according to a health ministry official on Thursday, who added all cases involved people who had been to Iran.

Iran, which lies east of Kuwait, has experienced the largest death toll from coronavirus outside China, with 26 deaths and 245 cases.

Cellular metabolism plays key role in dictating the fate decision between pathogenic and regulatory T cells

Patients with autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis have an imbalance between two types of immune system T cells. Destructive Th17 cells that mediate chronic inflammation are elevated, and regulatory T cells, or Treg cells, which suppress inflammatory responses and play a protective role in autoimmune disorders, are diminished.

Both cells differentiate from the same precursors — naïve CD4 T cells — and the beginning of their change to either Th17 or Treg cells starts with the same signal. Subsequently, a fate decision occurs, like a fork in the road, steering the changing CD4 cells to become either inflammatory T cells or regulatory T cells.