MDMA, Or Ecstasy, Shows Promise As A PTSD Treatment

The first time Lori Tipton tried MDMA, she was skeptical it would make a difference.

“I really was, at the beginning, very nervous,” Tipton said.

MDMA is the main ingredient in the club drug known as ecstasy or molly. But Tipton wasn’t taking pills sold on the street to get high. She was trying to treat her post-traumatic stress disorder by participating in a clinical trial.

With cancer risk timeline, middle-aged women recognize need for cervix screening

(Reuters Health) – When middle-aged women realize their cervical cancer risk from HPV lasts decades, more of them decide to get screened for this cancer than when they only know HPV has a role in cancer, without an explicit timeline, a small study found.

Human papillomavirus can cause cervical cancer up to 30 years after infection. Older women may think their sexual activity levels today don’t put them at risk – so uncoupling their risk perception from their current sex lives could encourage middle-aged women to understand they still need cervical cancer screening, the study authors write in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections.

Fitbit wins deal for 1 million new users in Singapore health plan

FILE PHOTO: Visitors walk past an advertising billboard for Fitbit Ionic watches at the IFA Electronics Show in Berlin, Germany, September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

(Reuters) – Fitbit Inc said on Wednesday it won a contract with the Singapore government to provide fitness trackers and services to up to one million of the country’s citizens as part of a health initiative that begins in October.

The deal, which involves the company supplying its trackers free of charge but on the condition that users will spend 10 Singapore dollars ($7.23) per month for a year.

How to Protect a Loved One With Dementia During a Heat Wave

News Picture: How to Protect a Loved One With Dementia During a Heat Wave

Latest Alzheimer’s News

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Heat waves can pose a serious risk to people with Alzheimer’s disease, so their families should know how to keep them safe, advocates say.

Extreme heat is “dangerous for everyone, but especially for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, who may be unable to spot the warning signs of trouble or know how to get help,” said Charles Fuschillo Jr., president and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA).

“Caregivers need to be proactive and prepared to protect their loved ones. Taking a few simple steps will go a long way,” he said in a foundation news release.

Type 1 diabetes linked to gut microbiome and genetic factors

A new study from Lingköping University in Sweden and the University of Florida has revealed that the gut microbiome of children with a high genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes is markedly different from children who have a low risk of developing the condition.

Gut microbiomeJuan Gaertner | Shutterstock

The new study suggests that an individual’s response to environmental factors that contribute to the development type 1 diabetes is influenced by genetic factors, and claims it is the first to report significant associations between genetic risk and changes in the gut microbiome.

A Brush With A Notorious Cat, My Rabies Education And The Big Bill That Followed

I was just petting an orange tabby cat in my Falls Church, Va., neighborhood, a cat I’d never met before. He was very cute. And he was purring and butting his head against my hand. Until he wasn’t.

He sunk his teeth into my wrist, hissed at me and ran off. So began my personal episode of Law & Order: Feline Victims Unit, complete with cat mug shots and weekly check-ins from local animal control and public health officials. And rabies shots. Multiple rabies shots in the emergency room. And more than $26,000 in health care costs, an alarming amount considering I was perfectly healthy throughout the whole ordeal.

Teva launches generic version of EpiPen for young children

(Reuters) – Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd on Tuesday made its generic version of Mylan’s EpiPen for young children available in most retail pharmacies at $300 for a 2-pack.

EpiPen auto-injection epinephrine pens manufactured by Mylan NV pharmaceutical company for use by severe allergy sufferers are seen in Washington, U.S. August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Bourg/File Photo

U.S.-listed shares of the Israel-based company rose 4.9% to $7 in afternoon trading.

Teva, the world’s largest generic drugmaker, is already selling the product for adults, after getting U.S. approval for its copy of EpiPen last August, following several years of delay.

Drugmakers Endo, Allergan agree to $15 million in settlements in major opioid case

(Reuters) – Endo International Plc (ENDP.O) and Allergan Plc (AGN.N) have agreed to pay $15 million to avoid going to trial in October in a landmark case by two Ohio counties accusing various drug manufacturers and distributors of fueling the U.S. opioid epidemic.

FILE PHOTO: Bottles of several opioid based medication at a pharmacy in Portsmouth, Ohio, June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston/File Photo

The tentative deals disclosed on Tuesday came ahead of the first trial to result from 2,000 lawsuits pending in federal court in Cleveland largely by local governments seeking to hold drug companies responsible for the deadly epidemic.

Genetic risk for autoimmunity may be linked to differences in gut microbiome

Children with increased genetic risk of type 1 diabetes have different gut microbiomes than those with low risk, a new study found.

A team of researchers at the Linköping University in Sweden and the University of Florida in the United States found that the genetic risk for developing type 1 diabetes autoimmunity is associated with distinct changes in the gut microbiome.

Gut bacteria, microbiome. Bacteria inside the large intestine, concept, representation. 3D illustration. Credit: Anatomy Insider / Shutterstock

Gut bacteria, microbiome. Bacteria inside the large intestine, concept, representation. 3D illustration. Credit: Anatomy Insider / Shutterstock

Genetic risk for type 1 diabetes linked with distinct changes in gut microbiome

Children with a high genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes have different gut microbiomes than children with a low risk, according to a new study from Linköping University in Sweden and the University of Florida in the US. The results published in the scientific journal Nature Communications suggest that genetic risk can shape an individual’s response to environmental factors in the development of autoimmune diseases.