Trump Administration Moves To Make Health Care Costs More Transparent

Shopping around for the best deal on a medical X-ray or a new knee? The Trump administration has a plan for that.

On Monday, it proposed new rules that would provide consumers far more detail about the actual prices hospitals charge insurers. It comes amid growing calls from consumer advocates, who argue transparency can help tackle rising health care costs. But the plan also has the potential to overwhelm patients with data.

Trump firms up plan to import medicines; pharma companies resist

(Reuters) – The Trump administration took a step Wednesday toward allowing importation of medicines from Canada, an action the president has advocated as a way to bring cheaper prescription drugs to Americans, but the pharmaceutical industry was quick to resist the move.

FILE PHOTO: Pharmaceutical tablets and capsules are arranged in the shape of a U.S. dollar sign on a table. August 20, 2014. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic/File Photo

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) said it and the Food and Drug Administration will propose a rule that will allow it to authorize states and other groups to pursue pilot projects related to importing drugs from Canada.

U.S. nurses may not be ready for nuclear emergencies

(Reuters Health) – U.S. nurses may not receive adequate training in how to care for patients during a nuclear event or radiation emergency, a nationwide survey of nursing schools suggests.

More than three-fourths of nursing school administrators and faculty who participated said their curriculum included no training or less than one hour of training on nuclear emergency preparedness, researchers report in the journal Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness.

“We’re looking at how to make sure the American health care system is robust and optimized for a disaster event, which includes making sure the workforce has the knowledge, skills and abilities to understand how to respond,” said lead author Tener Veenema of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland.

In The Battle Of The Fitness Trackers, The Most Steps Might Not Win

When Sonia Anderson got her first Fitbit step tracker, her poor pooch, Bronx, had no idea of all the steps that were coming.

The device — which counts every step Anderson takes and displays those steps on an app — was a Christmas gift from her daughters two years ago.

At the time, Bronx, a Yorkshire terrier, was younger and could still manage the additional walks up and down the trails along the sprawling apartment complex in Alexandria, Va., where Anderson lives. Anderson was on a mission to clock 10,000 steps a day.

Inspector Paints A Rosy Picture Of Migrant Detention Centers — In Contrast To Audits

JEFFERSON, Md. — For the past year, the tiny Maryland company employed by the federal government to inspect U.S. immigration detention centers has painted a rosy picture of life in captivity.

In dozens of reports filed in the past 12 months, inspectors with the 11-person Nakamoto Group described detainees who had “no substantive complaints” and facilities where the atmosphere is “calm with no obvious indicators of high stress.”

“None of the detainees expressed any concerns about their treatment or safety,” Nakamoto employees wrote in a typical March 2019 report, following inspection of the Rio Grande Detention Center in Laredo, Texas, a border city overwhelmed by recent waves of Central American migrants seeking asylum.

Second Ebola case detected in eastern Congo’s main city

FILE PHOTO: A man washes his hands after Ebola screening upon entering the General Hospital in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, July 15, 2019. REUTERS/Olivia Acland/File Photo

GOMA, Democratic Republic of Congo (Reuters) – A second case of Ebola was detected on Tuesday in the eastern Congolese city of Goma, a local health official said, increasing concern the virus could establish a foothold in the densely populated area close to the Rwandan border.

Goma’s first Ebola case was detected in mid-July, prompting the World Health Organization (WHO) to warn that the spread of the disease could accelerate. The epidemic has killed more than 1,700 people since it was declared almost a year ago, becoming the second-worst outbreak on record.

Exclusive: Two powerful Canadian provinces argued against federal drug price crackdown

TORONTO/MONTREAL (Reuters) – Canada’s two most populous provinces, Ontario and Quebec, have privately expressed concerns with a federal government plan to slash the price of patented drugs, arguing that such regulatory changes could hurt investment in life sciences.

FILE PHOTO: A pharmacist counts prescription drugs at the at the CentreTown Pharmacy in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, June 12, 2019. REUTERS/Chris Wattie/File Photo

The Canadian government has said it plans to soon publish a final version of new regulations aimed at cutting patented drug prices that are among the highest in the world. Announced in 2017, the changes were expected to take effect in January, but the government delayed them to review feedback.

‘Digital twins’ of individual patients may help find best medication to each patient

Advanced computer models of diseases can be used to improve diagnosis and treatment. The goal is to develop the models to “digital twins” of individual patients. Those twins may help to computationally identify and try the best medication, before actually treating a patient. The models are the result of an international study, published in the open access journal Genome Medicine.

Combination therapy could be a promising treatment for late-stage acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for one in five adult leukemias, and is the most common pediatric cancer in the United States. While new immune therapies have helped improve survival rates, some patients are unresponsive to existing treatment regimens. In addition, drug-related toxicities and drug resistance are rampant for these patients, spurring an urgent need for new therapy options.

Creator Of Brain Exam That Trump Aced Demands New Training For Testers

Last year, Dr. Ronny Jackson, then the White House physician, gave Donald Trump a standard test to detect early signs of dementia — and said the president had scored a perfect 30. “There is no indication whatsoever that he has any cognitive issues,” Jackson said at the time in front of TV cameras.

Trump’s team embraced the result, with Donald Jr. boasting on Twitter: “More #winning.” The publicity sparked a wave of interest in the screening tool. Much was written about what the test showed — or didn’t — about the president’s mental acuity. A media outlet even posted its questions online, suggesting readers could measure whether they were “fit to be U.S. president.”