Medications to treat cardiovascular risk factors do not impact erectile function

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major public health problem. Men being treated for cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol are at increased risk of developing ED and often consider this condition a side effect of their medications. However, a new study into the effects of cholesterol-lowering statins and blood-pressure lowering candesartan/HCTZ concludes that these medications do not negatively affect erectile function.
Visit the Source Site

Powered by WPeMatico

Blood pressure and cholesterol lowering drugs do not negatively affect erectile function, study says

January 29, 2018

New study provides reassurance for men taking blood pressure and cholesterol modifying medications, reports the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major public health problem. Men being treated for cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol are at increased risk of developing ED and often consider this condition a side effect of their medications. However, a new study into the effects of cholesterol-lowering statins and blood-pressure lowering candesartan/HCTZ concludes that these medications do not negatively affect erectile function. The study is published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

Rheumatoid arthritis found to worsen during and after menopause, study says

January 29, 2018

A new study published in Rheumatology identified a deteriorated physical functioning among post-menopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.

Credit: Hriana/ Shutterstock.com

Researchers examined 8,189 women with rheumatoid arthritis and observed an increased physical decline in post-menopausal women, compared to pre-menopausal women.

Physical functioning is considered an important study aspect in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, since it affects their quality of life. Women with rheumatoid arthritis are subjected to a threefold increased risk of the disease along with increased severity and disability than men. However, the sex-based differences in the condition are still unclear.

Menopause found to worsen symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

A recent study suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8,189 women with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a slower physical decline than those that were post-menopausal.
Visit the Source Site

Powered by WPeMatico

Trump wants U.S. Health Secretary to get tough on drug prices, opioids

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump on Monday charged the new U.S. health secretary with bringing down drug prices and to be tough on pharmaceutical companies about the widespread abuse of prescription opiates.

“He’s going to get those prescription drug prices way down,” said Trump at a swearing-in ceremony for Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, adding that Azar would be “very tough” on drug companies and doctors about prescribing opioids.

Reporting by Lisa Lambert and Steve Holland

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Visit the Source Site

Powered by WPeMatico

Takeda’s Zika vaccine gets U.S. FDA’s ‘fast track’ status

(Reuters) – Japan’s Takeda Pharmaceutical Co Ltd said on Monday the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had granted ‘fast track’ status to its vaccine for the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which erupted as a major public hazard in Brazil three years ago.

The drug, TAK-426, is currently being tested on 240 patients between the ages of 18 and 49 and is in early stages of development.

The virus might be responsible for an increase in birth defects in the United States and its territories, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report last week.

Women with rheumatoid arthritis suffer greater decline in physical function after menopause

January 29, 2018

A recent study published in Rheumatology suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8189 women with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a slower physical decline than those that were post-menopausal.

Physical function is an important aspect of study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as it impacts their quality of life. Women experience rheumatoid arthritis at a rate three times greater than men, and also have more severe decline and increased disability, yet the sex-based differences in the condition remain poorly understood.

Arizona governor signs opioid crackdown legislation

PHOENIX (Reuters) – Arizona Republican Governor Doug Ducey on Friday signed into law legislation intended to crack down on opioid abuse, calling it vital to combat an epidemic felt statewide and across the nation.

“We’ve all heard the first person stories of individuals who have been impacted,” Ducey said at a signing ceremony. “But there are so many other stories we haven’t heard because the individuals impacted didn’t survive. This bill is for them.”

The legislation includes new regulations that will limit initial opioid prescriptions to five days and set a maximum of 30 days for certain patients receiving highly addictive painkillers.

Roche hemophilia drug lowers costs despite high price: ICER

(Reuters) – A costly new Roche Holding AG drug to treat the bleeding disorder hemophilia A could significantly reduce healthcare expenses for certain patients, a draft report from an independent U.S. nonprofit organization that evaluates clinical and cost effectiveness of new medicines said on Friday.

The drug, Hemlibra, or emicizumab, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in November as a once-weekly injection for adults and pediatric patients with hemophilia A who have developed inhibitors, or resistance, to other treatments. Roche’s medicine is required to carry a black box warning, the most serious, about the risk of blood clots.

Another Alzheimer’s Drug Fails: What Makes This Disease So Tough to Fight?

News Picture: Another Alzheimer's Drug Fails: What Makes This Disease So Tough to Fight?By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimers News

THURSDAY, Jan. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As more experimental drugs fail to stop Alzheimer’s from destroying human memory, experts now wonder whether research into the devastating brain disease has been marching in the wrong direction.

In recent weeks, a pair of high-profile disappointments have been reported, including one just announced on a trial of the Eli Lily drug solanezumab.

Now, researchers are trying to figure out what might have been missed in the search for an Alzheimer’s cure.