The Secret To Chronic Happiness As You Age

By all rights, Fletcher Hall should not be happy.

At 76, the retired trade association manager has endured three heart attacks and eight heart bypass operations. He’s had four stents and a balloon inserted in his heart. He has diabetes, glaucoma, osteoarthritis in both knees and diabetic neuropathy in both legs. He can’t drive. He can’t travel much. He can’t see very well. And his heart condition severely limits his ability to exercise. On a good day, he can walk about 10 yards before needing to rest.

St. Kitts Launches Probe Of Herpes Vaccine Tests On U.S. Patients

The government of St. Kitts and Nevis has launched an investigation into the clinical trial for a herpes vaccine by an American company because it said its officials were not notified about the experiments.

The vaccine research has sparked controversy because the lead investigator, a professor with Southern Illinois University, and the U.S. company he co-founded did not rely on traditional U.S. safety oversight while testing the vaccine last year on mostly American participants on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts.

Arizona accuses Insys of fraudulent opioid marketing scheme

(Reuters) – Arizona’s attorney general sued Insys Therapeutics Inc on Thursday, accusing the drugmaker of engaging in a fraudulent marketing scheme aimed at increasing sales of a fentanyl-based cancer pain medicine.

The lawsuit by Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix comes during a series of federal and state investigations centered on Insys’ Subsys opioid drug.

The lawsuit, filed in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix, accused Insys of paying doctors sham speaker fees in exchange for writing prescriptions of Subsys without regard for the health of patients.

Amazon hit with lawsuit over eclipse glasses

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Amazon.com (AMZN.O) has been hit with a proposed class action lawsuit by a couple who claims defective eclipse glasses purchased through the online retailer damaged their eyes.

In the lawsuit, filed in federal court in South Carolina on Tuesday evening, Corey Payne and his fiancée, Kayla Harris, said they purchased a three-pack of eclipse glasses on Amazon in early August, assuming that the glasses would allow them to safely view the United States’ first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in a century on Aug. 21.

Autoimmune diseases increase cardiovascular and mortality risk

Autoimmune diseases significantly increase cardiovascular risk as well as overall mortality, new research confirms. This is particularly pronounced in people suffering rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, it has been seen that inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis, increase the risk of stroke and death through any cause.
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Pioneering Cancer Gene Therapy Gets Green Light — And $475,000 Price Tag

The country’s first approved gene therapy — approved Wednesday to fight leukemia that resists standard therapies — will cost $475,000 for a one-time treatment, its manufacturer announced.

Switzerland-based Novartis, which makes the innovative therapy, announced that the drug will cost nothing if patients fail to benefit in the first month.

The Food and Drug Administration approved the therapy, called Kymriah, in children and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose disease has come back in spite of previous treatments. These patients typically have a poor prognosis, surviving three to nine months, according to Novartis.

5 Outside-The-Box Ideas For Fixing The Individual Insurance Market

With Republican efforts to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act stalled, tentative bipartisan initiatives are in the works to shore up the fragile individual insurance market that serves roughly 17 million Americans.

The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee launches hearings the week Congress returns in September on “stabilizing premiums in the individual insurance market” that will feature state governors and insurance commissioners. A bipartisan group in the House is also working to come up with compromise proposals.

Egypt promotes birth control to fight rapid population growth

CAIRO (Reuters) – Egypt is pushing to educate people in rural areas on birth control and family planning in a bid to slow a population growth rate that President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said poses a threat to national development.

The country is already the most populous in the Arab world with 93 million citizens and is set to grow to 128 million by 2030 if fertility rates of 4.0 births per thousand women continue, according to government figures.

In 2016, Egypt saw the birth of 2.6 million babies, the country’s statistics agency CAPMAS said last month.

Novartis gene therapy approval signals new cancer treatment era

(Reuters) – Novartis AG on Wednesday won highly anticipated U.S. approval for the first of a new type of potent gene-modifying immunotherapy for leukemia, a $475,000 treatment that marks the start of a potential new treatment paradigm for some cancers.

The approval was widely expected after an FDA advisory panel last month unanimously recommended the action.

Novartis shares closed virtually unchanged in Swiss trading.

Novartis also announced an agreement with the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under which payment for the therapy will be based on clinical outcomes achieved.

Women at Risk for Alzheimer’s Face Critical 10-Year Window, Study Says

News Picture: Women at Risk for Alzheimer's Face Critical 10-Year Window, Study Says

Latest Alzheimers News

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Women with a genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease face a 10-year window when they have far greater chances of developing the disease than men with similar genetic risks, a new analysis suggests.

That window seems to occur between ages 65 and 75 — more than 10 years after the start of menopause, say University of Southern California researchers who reviewed 27 prior studies.

“Menopause and plummeting estrogen levels, which on average begins at 51, may account for the difference,” said study co-author Judy Pa. She is an assistant professor of neurology at the USC Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute.