Indiana’s Claims About Its Medicaid Experiment Don’t All Check Out

Indiana expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act in 2015, adding conditions designed to appeal to the state’s conservative leadership. The federal government approved the experiment, called the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, which is now up for a three-year renewal.

But a close reading of the state’s renewal application shows that misleading and inaccurate information is being used to justify extending HIP 2.0.

This is important because the initial application and expansion happened on the watch of then-governor and now Vice President Mike Pence. And Seema Verma, who is President Donald Trump’s pick to lead the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, helped design it. (Among other functions, CMS oversees all Medicaid programs.) So, states are watching to see if the approval of Indiana’s application is a bellwether for Medicaid’s future.

Hospitals, Both Rural And Urban, Dread Losing Ground With Health Law Repeal

[embedded content]

PRINCETON, Ill. — Commuting past the barren winter fields in northern Illinois, Cathie Chapman worries about the future.

More than a year ago, she lost her job at a nearby rural hospital after it closed and, as Republicans work to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, wonders whether she’ll soon be out of work again.

“Many of my friends did not find jobs they love,” she said. “They’re working for less money or only part time. Some haven’t found any jobs yet, even after a year.”

Now she runs the pharmacy at Perry Memorial Hospital here, warily watching the Republicans’ repeal efforts.

Supporting Comprehensive and Innovative Care for Children: Request for Information on a Potential Pediatric Alternative Payment Model

February 27
by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

February 27, 2017

By Patrick Conway, M.D., M.Sc., Acting Administrator, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Deidre Gifford, M.D., M.P.H., Deputy Director, Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services; Ellen-Marie Whelan, N.P., Ph.D., Chief Population Health Officer, Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services; and Alex Billioux, M.D., D.Phil., Director, Division of Population Health Incentives and Infrastructure, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation

BIDMC scientists discover vulnerability that offers new strategy to combat triple-negative breast cancer

February 28, 2017 at 1:55 AM

Physicians currently have no targeted treatment options available for women diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer known as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), leaving standard-of-care chemotherapies as a first line of defense against the disease. However, most women with TNBC do not respond to these broadly-targeted chemotherapies, and those who do often develop resistance to the drugs. Investigators at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have discovered a vulnerability that offers a new strategy to combat TNBC.

Their findings are published online today in the journal Cancer Discovery.

Drowning In A ‘High-Risk Insurance Pool’ — At $18,000 A Year

Some Republicans looking to scrap the Affordable Care Act say monthly health insurance premiums need to be lower for the individuals who have to buy insurance on their own. One way to do that, GOP leaders say, would be to return to the use of what are called high-risk insurance pools, for people who have health problems.

But critics say even some of the most successful high-risk pools that operated before the advent of Obamacare were very expensive for patients enrolled in the plans, and for the people who subsidized them — which included state taxpayers and people with employer-based health insurance.

To Pay Or Not To Pay – That Is The Question

K.A. Curtis gave up her career in the nonprofit world in 2008 to care for her ailing parents in Fresno, Calif., which also meant giving up her income.

She wasn’t able to afford health insurance as a result, and for each tax year since 2014, Curtis has applied for — and received — an exemption from the Affordable Care Act’s coverage requirement and the related tax penalty, she says.

This year, given President Donald Trump’s promise to repeal the ACA, along with his executive order urging federal officials to weaken parts of the law, Curtis began to wonder whether she’d even have to apply for an exemption for her 2016 taxes.

Trump seeks help of insurers to smooth Obamacare transition

FILE PHOTO - The federal government forms for applying for health coverage are seen at a rally held by supporters of the Affordable Care Act, widely referred to as ''Obamacare'', outside the Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center in Jackson, Mississippi, U.S. on October 4, 2013.  REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman/File Photo
FILE PHOTO – The federal government forms for applying for health coverage are seen at a rally held by supporters of the Affordable Care Act, widely referred to as ”Obamacare”, outside the Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center in Jackson, Mississippi, U.S. on October…

REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman/File Photo

Visit the Source Site

Powered by WPeMatico