First transplant of 'dead' heart








By James Gallagher
Health editor, BBC News website


Transmedic machineThe console where the heart is “reactivated” is being called the heart-in-a-box machine


Surgeons in Australia say they have performed the first heart transplant using a “dead heart”.

Donor hearts from adults usually come from people who are confirmed as brain dead but with a heart still beating.

A team at St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney revived and then transplanted hearts that had stopped beating for up to 20 minutes.

New York City says hospital testing doctor with Ebola-like symptoms

A volunteer of the German army Bundeswehr, wearing a protective suit, is disinfected by a colleague during an Ebola training session at the Marseille barracks in Appen, October 23, 2014. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

A volunteer of the German army Bundeswehr, wearing a protective suit, is disinfected by a colleague during an Ebola training session at the Marseille barracks in Appen, October 23, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Fabian Bimmer


(Reuters) – A New York City hospital is running Ebola tests on a healthcare worker who returned to the United States from West Africa with a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms, the city’s Health Department said on Thursday.

Preliminary test results were expected in the next 12 hours, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said in a statement.

Rheumatoid arthritis: Researchers identify new signaling pathway thought to play role

A new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) identifies a new cell signaling pathway that contributes to the development and progression of inflammatory bone erosion, which occurs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Bone erosion in joints is a major cause of disability in RA patients.

The study, titled “RBP-J imposes a requirement for ITAM-mediated costimulation of osteoclastogenesis,” was published online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation on October 20. Baohong Zhao, PhD, lead investigator and assistant scientist in the Arthritis and Tissue Degeneration Program at HSS, and colleagues uncovered a novel signaling pathway and elucidated the underlying mechanisms that could contribute to bone destruction in RA.

Obama says cautiously more optimistic about Ebola situation in U.S.


U.S. President Barack Obama talks to the press after meeting with his team coordinating the government's Ebola response in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, October 16, 2014. REUTERS/Larry Downing


U.S. President Barack Obama talks to the press after meeting with his team coordinating the government’s Ebola response in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, October 16, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Larry Downing


(Reuters) – President Barack Obama expressed cautious optimism about the Ebola situation in the United States on Wednesday after the U.S. government imposed new screening measures for travelers from West Africa.

NICE conflicts of interests claim








Adam BrimelowBy Adam Brimelow
Health Correspondent, BBC News


statin pill


A group of leading doctors and researchers has called on MPs to investigate potential conflicts of interest at the watchdog NICE.

In a letter to the Health Select Committee, they have expressed concern about financial ties to drug companies among experts working for NICE.

The concerns follow controversy over the recent NICE guideline on statin drugs.

NICE has defended its procedures on conflicts of interests.

Study identifies new signaling pathway that leads to inflammatory bone erosion in RA patients

A new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) identifies a new signaling pathway that contributes to the development and progression of inflammatory bone erosion, which occurs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects millions of adults worldwide. Bone erosion in joints is a major cause of disability in RA patients.

Curfew in Sierra Leone town after rioting, shooting over Ebola case


(Reuters) – Authorities in Sierra Leone imposed a curfew in the eastern town of Koidu on Tuesday after a dispute between youth and police over a suspected case of Ebola degenerated into gunfire and rioting, officials said.

A local civil society leader said he had seen at least two bodies with gunshot wounds. The head of the local police unit said youth had fired at officers with shotguns but denied anyone had been shot dead.

Americans back travel ban from Ebola outbreak countries: Reuters/Ipsos poll

Protestor Jeff Hulbert of Annapolis, Maryland holds a sign as he demonstrates in favor of a travel ban to stop the spread of the Ebola virus, in front of the White House in Washington October 16, 2014.  REUTERS/Jim Bourg

Protestor Jeff Hulbert of Annapolis, Maryland holds a sign as he demonstrates in favor of a travel ban to stop the spread of the Ebola virus, in front of the White House in Washington October 16, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Jim Bourg


(Reuters) – Nearly three-fourths of Americans support a ban on civilian air travel in and out of the West African countries that have experienced an Ebola outbreak, a new Reuters/Ipsos poll shows, suggesting growing pressure on President Barack Obama over the issue.

Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.