Babies can learn to love vegetables








Feeding a babyDo not give up on introducing new vegetables, researchers say


Children can learn to eat new vegetables if they are introduced regularly before the age of two, suggests a University of Leeds study.

Even fussy eaters can be encouraged to eat more greens if they are offered them five to 10 times, it found.

The research team gave artichoke puree to 332 children aged between four and 38 months from the UK, France and Denmark.

Pharmacyclics, J&J drug shown to improve leukemia survival


(Reuters) – A new drug for the most common form of leukemia in adults improves survival for patients whose disease has worsened despite standard treatment, according to late-stage study findings released on Saturday.

Ibrutinib, sold by Pharmacyclics Inc and Johnson & Johnson under the brand name Imbruvica, was approved by U.S. regulators for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in February.

The therapy “beat the pants off” of ofatumumab, or Arzerra, marketed by GlaxoSmithKline Plc, in the Phase 3 trial, said Dr. John Byrd, the study’s lead investigator and a professor of medicine at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in Columbus, Ohio.

Cancer waiting time targets slip








CalendarPatients suspected to have cancer should be seen within 62 days


A key government target for treating people diagnosed with suspected cancer has been breached for the first time since it was introduced in 2009.

NHS England guidelines say that 85% of patients should wait a maximum of 62 days to begin their first treatment following referral from their GP.

But figures show this slipped to 84.4% from January to March this year.

House OKs plan to protect state medical marijuana laws

A marijuana leaf is displayed at Canna Pi medical marijuana dispensary in Seattle, Washington, November 27, 2012.  REUTERS/Anthony Bolante

A marijuana leaf is displayed at Canna Pi medical marijuana dispensary in Seattle, Washington, November 27, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Anthony Bolante


(Reuters) – The U.S. federal government would not be allowed to spend money to block states from implementing their own medical marijuana laws under legislation passed by the House of Representatives as more states legalize using it to treat various ailments.

The Republican-led House of Representatives passed the measure late on Thursday as part of a larger bipartisan funding bill. The measure still needs approval in the Democrat-controlled Senate, and then to be signed into law by President Barack Obama.

In treating some cancer patients, less is more: U.S. studies


(Reuters) – Doctors can scale back treatment for certain cancer patients, based on evidence that some drugs can be used less frequently, according to new information that is clearing the way for physicians to limit the risks of care.

Several studies backing up this “less-is-more” strategy, which can also lower the cost of care, were presented on Friday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago.

US measles cases reach 20-year high








A California child receives an immunisation shot.Parents are being encouraged to get their children vaccinated


Public health experts in the US are urging people to get vaccinated after a spike in measles cases in the country this year.

The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention reported 288 cases of measles in the first five months of 2014 – the largest number for 20 years.

The outbreak is thought to be linked to US citizens travelling to the Philippines.

The CDC says timely vaccination is the best way to prevent measles.

Obama: when it comes to head injuries in sports, don't just 'suck it up'

U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced by Victoria Belluci of Huntington, Md.(L) at the White House Healthy Kids & Safe Sports Concussion Summit while in the East Room of the White House in Washington, May 29, 2014. REUTERS/Larry Downing


(Reuters) – President Barack Obama said on Thursday more effort is needed to prevent concussions in young athletes, including greater awareness of the severity of head injuries, which are too often dismissed as headaches instead of serious brain trauma.

Obama, speaking at a White House conference highlighting the risks of concussions to young athletes, called for more research, improved safety equipment and better protocols.

“We’ve got to have every parent and coach and teacher recognize the signs of concussions, and we need more athletes to understand how important it is to do what we can to prevent injuries – and to admit them when they do have them,” he said.

Tanning beds must carry skin cancer warning: U.S. FDA

A view shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland August 14, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A view shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland August 14, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Jason Reed


(Reuters) – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is strengthening its regulation of tanning beds, which have been shown to increase the risk of skin cancer.

The FDA, which is reclassifying sun lamp products from low risk to moderate risk, said on Thursday that in future sun lamp manufacturers must seek approval before they market a new product.

New bird flu 'not global threat'








By James Gallagher
Health and science reporter, BBC News


Influenza virus


The latest type of bird flu detected in China, H10N8, does not pose an imminent global threat, say researchers.

There have been three reported cases and two deaths since December 2013.

UK Medical Research Council scientists analysed the molecular structure of the virus to show it did not share the characteristics of previous pandemics.

Instead they argued resources should be focused on other flu viruses that are emerging or are already present in South East Asia.

Hunt for MERS source should look beyond camels: veterinary officials

A man wearing a mask looks on as he stands in front of camels at a camel market in the village of al-Thamama near Riyadh May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser

A man wearing a mask looks on as he stands in front of camels at a camel market in the village of al-Thamama near Riyadh May 11, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Faisal Al Nasser


(Reuters) – Scientists lack proof that camels are the source of a deadly new virus that has killed 186 people in Saudi Arabia and should widen their hunt to other animals, veterinary experts meeting in Paris said.

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) was discovered in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and has since infected more than 650 people worldwide, including in the United States and France. It can cause flu-like symptoms, pneumonia and organ failure in some.