Over 2.1 million have signed up for Obamacare: officials

The federal government forms for applying for health coverage are seen at a rally held by supporters of the Affordable Care Act, widely referred to as ”Obamacare”, outside the Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center in Jackson, Mississippi October 4, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Bachman

Visit the Source Site

Vitamin E may slow early Alzheimer's decline: study

By Andrew M. Seaman

NEW YORK Tue Dec 31, 2013 4:04pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Taking vitamin E during the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease slowed declines in patients’ ability to perform basic tasks by about six months in a new study.

“It will be very interesting to see to what extent this will change practice,” Dr. Maurice Dysken said. “I think it will, but we’ll have to see how people in the field such as providers view the findings and patients too.”

Antioxidants in diet linked to cataract risk

By Kathryin Doyle

NEW YORK Tue Dec 31, 2013 2:22pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Women who eat foods rich in antioxidants may have a lower risk of cataracts as they age, according to a new Swedish analysis.

“Oxidative damage of the eye lens caused by free radicals has been suggested to be crucial in development of cataract,” said Susanne Rautiainen of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institutet, who led the study.

Over 2 million have signed up for Obamacare: U.S. officials

The federal government forms for applying for health coverage are seen at a rally held by supporters of the Affordable Care Act, widely referred to as ”Obamacare”, outside the Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center in Jackson, Mississippi October 4, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Bachman

Visit the Source Site

Decision aids reduce mammograms among older women

By Kathryn Doyle

NEW YORK Mon Dec 30, 2013 4:13pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Women over 75 who learned more about the risks and benefits of mammogram screenings were less likely to go through with the test in a new study.

Women should have a mammogram – an X-ray of the breast tissue scanning for early signs of cancer – every two years between ages 50 and 74, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

Most minority patients cared for by non-white docs

By Andrew M. Seaman

NEW YORK Mon Dec 30, 2013 4:09pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – More than half of U.S. minority patients are cared for by doctors who are also minorities, according to a new analysis.

Using data from a 2010 U.S. survey, researchers found that about 54 percent of minority patients report their doctors are not white. That number was even greater – about 70 percent – among non-English speaking patients.

Thicker brain sections tied to spirituality: study

By Andrew M. Seaman

NEW YORK Mon Dec 30, 2013 2:14pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – For people at high risk of depression because of a family history, spirituality may offer some protection for the brain, a new study hints.

Parts of the brain’s outer layer, the cortex, were thicker in high-risk study participants who said religion or spirituality was “important” to them versus those who cared less about religion.

Donors pitch in to pay for surgery for extremely obese Texas girl

AUSTIN, Texas Mon Dec 30, 2013 2:09pm EST

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) – Nearly 1,500 donors have pledged more than $62,000 to help pay for surgery for a 12-year-old Texas girl diagnosed as morbidly obese due to a brain disease that is causing her to gain about two pounds a week.

Alexis Shapiro suffered damage to her pituitary gland, which helps regulate weight, as a result of the brain disease. She has gained about 140 pounds (63.5 kgs) in less than two years because of the problem, her mother said. Her extreme excess of body fat is clinically defined as morbid obesity.

Straumann to cut prices of some dental implants

ZURICH Sun Dec 29, 2013 10:43am EST

ZURICH (Reuters) – The world’s largest dental implant maker, Straumann, will cut the price of its standard titanium implants by around 15 percent next year in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, the firm’s chief executive told a Swiss newspaper on Sunday.

The Swiss company said its price gap with rivals must be reduced, and that it may adjust prices in other parts of Europe at a later date.

Patient doing well with French company's artificial heart: report

PARIS Sun Dec 29, 2013 10:36am EST

PARIS (Reuters) – A 75-year-old Frenchman was feeding himself and chatting to his family, more than a week after becoming the first person to be fitted with an artificial heart made by French biomedical company Carmat, one of his surgeons said.

“He is awake, feeding himself and talking with his family. We are thinking of getting him up on his feet soon, probably as early as this weekend,” Professor Daniel Duveau, who saw the patient on Thursday, told Le Journal du Dimanche newspaper.