Marijuana treatments for autoimmune disorders

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Marijuana treatments for autoimmune disorders

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Researchers from the University of South Carolina say that tetrahydrocannabinol, the principal constituent of marijuana, may have another medical use – treating those with autoimmune disorders.

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is known to have analgesic effects so can be used to treat pain. It also aids relaxation and can reduce feelings of nausea and stimulate appetite, making it useful for those undergoing chemotherapy.

Now, a new study, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, explores how microRNAs are influenced by THC.

Unprotected sex among U.S. gay men on the rise, study shows

By David Beasley

ATLANTA Wed Nov 27, 2013 4:33pm EST

ATLANTA (Reuters) – The proportion of men in the United States having unprotected sex with other men increased 20 percent from 2005 to 2011, according to a federal study released on Wednesday, raising new concerns over the spread of the HIV virus, which causes AIDS.

Fifty-seven percent of men who have sex with other men reported having unprotected anal sex at least once in the last 12 months, up from 48 percent in 2005, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Older women still getting Pap smears despite guidelines

By Kathryn Doyle

Wed Nov 27, 2013 3:41pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuter Health) – Women who’ve had a hysterectomy, and most women over 65, don’t need regular swabs for signs of cervical cancer – but lots of them are getting the test anyway, say U.S. researchers.

Experts recommend that young women start having internal pelvic exams, including a Papanicolaou test, or “Pap smear,” to check for abnormal cells on the cervix, performed by a gynecologist at age 21. The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women ages 21 to 65 without a history of cervical problems have a Pap smear every three years.

Tongue controller for the paralyzed offers greater independence

By Sharon Begley

NEW YORK Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:01pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters) – From fashion statement to … wheelchair controller?

In an advance that promises to improve the lives of the more than 250,000 people in the United States who are paralyzed from the neck down, researchers announced on Wednesday that they have developed a wireless device that operates specially rigged chairs by means of a tiny titanium barbell pierced through the tongue.

Study links high sodium 'fizzy' medicines to raised heart risks

By Kate Kelland

LONDON Wed Nov 27, 2013 1:42pm EST

LONDON (Reuters) – Millions of patients worldwide taking effervescent, dispersible and soluble medicines have an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes because of the high salt content of such drugs, scientists said on Wednesday.

Researchers from Britain’s University of Dundee and University College London found that with some “fizzy” versions of painkillers, vitamin supplements or other common medicines, taking the maximum daily dose would on its own exceed daily recommended limits for sodium, the main component of salt.

Study links high sodium ‘fizzy’ medicines to raised heart risks

By Kate Kelland

LONDON Wed Nov 27, 2013 1:42pm EST

LONDON (Reuters) – Millions of patients worldwide taking effervescent, dispersible and soluble medicines have an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes because of the high salt content of such drugs, scientists said on Wednesday.

Researchers from Britain’s University of Dundee and University College London found that with some “fizzy” versions of painkillers, vitamin supplements or other common medicines, taking the maximum daily dose would on its own exceed daily recommended limits for sodium, the main component of salt.

Higher BDNF May Delay Dementia

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Neurology

Published: Nov 26, 2013 | Updated: Nov 26, 2013

By John Gever, Deputy Managing Editor, MedPage Today
Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner

Action Points

  • In the Framingham Heart Study, cognitively healthy adults with higher serum levels of BDNF had a reduced risk of future occurrence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Shortage of rheumatologists – in some U.S. regions closest doctor may be 200 miles away

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Shortage of rheumatologists – in some U.S. regions closest doctor may be 200 miles away

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A novel study published in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) journal, Arthritis & Rheumatism, shows that smaller micropolitan areas of the U.S. – those with less than 50,000 people – have very few or no practicing adult rheumatologist. In some of these areas, individuals have to travel more than 200 miles to reach the closest rheumatologist.

Future anti-inflammatory drugs for chronic inflammation diseases may come from coumarins

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Future anti-inflammatory drugs for chronic inflammation diseases may come from coumarins

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New methods for the laboratory-scale synthesis of coumarin-based drugs were developed in a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland. In his doctoral thesis, Lic. Phil. Juri Timonen also developed new analytical methods for the fast identification of natural and non-natural coumarins. A few of the synthesised coumarins were also found to inhibit some specific reactions generally associated with inflammation.