Trust did not warn of killer's risk

31 October 2013 Last updated at 10:00 ET

Brian MaddockBrian Maddock told his psychotherapist he wanted to kill Mr Naylor

A NHS trust failed to warn a man who was killed by his former partner that he was at risk, a report has revealed.

Killer Brian Maddock, 44, had previously told his psychotherapist he planned to kill Michael Naylor with a knife he had under his bed.

The report by NHS England said the risk posed to Mr Naylor by Maddock had not been assessed, before he died at their home in Manchester in 2010.

Trust did not warn of killer’s risk

31 October 2013 Last updated at 10:00 ET

Brian MaddockBrian Maddock told his psychotherapist he wanted to kill Mr Naylor

A NHS trust failed to warn a man who was killed by his former partner that he was at risk, a report has revealed.

Killer Brian Maddock, 44, had previously told his psychotherapist he planned to kill Michael Naylor with a knife he had under his bed.

The report by NHS England said the risk posed to Mr Naylor by Maddock had not been assessed, before he died at their home in Manchester in 2010.

Breast cancer 'rising in under-40s'

31 October 2013 Last updated at 09:53 ET

By Helen Briggs BBC News

Breast cancerWomen in general have a 1-in-8 chance of developing breast cancer

Cases of breast cancer in women under 40 are rising across Europe, research suggests.

Experts say it is unclear whether this is due to improved diagnosis or new risk factors.

A study in Cancer Epidemiology found cases rose by about 1% a year between 1990 and 2008 in seven countries.

Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer among women globally, and the leading cause of cancer death.

Breast cancer ‘rising in under-40s’

31 October 2013 Last updated at 09:53 ET

By Helen Briggs BBC News

Breast cancerWomen in general have a 1-in-8 chance of developing breast cancer

Cases of breast cancer in women under 40 are rising across Europe, research suggests.

Experts say it is unclear whether this is due to improved diagnosis or new risk factors.

A study in Cancer Epidemiology found cases rose by about 1% a year between 1990 and 2008 in seven countries.

Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer among women globally, and the leading cause of cancer death.

WHO confirms four more cases of Middle East virus

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LONDON | Thu Oct 31, 2013 1:37pm EDT

LONDON (Reuters) – Three more people in Saudi Arabia have become infected with the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus and one has died, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday, and it also confirmed the first MERS case in Oman.

In a disease outbreak update, the Geneva-based United Nations health agency said the four new cases bring the number of people worldwide struck by the MERS virus to 149, of which 63 have died.

For some obese people, surgery beats other options

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By Kathryn Doyle

NEW YORK | Thu Oct 31, 2013 3:23pm EDT

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Diet, exercise, therapy and drugs can help obese people get healthier. But weight-loss surgery does a better job of getting rid of extra pounds and treating type 2 diabetes, a new review of past studies shows.

The studies only followed people for two years. So it’s possible the results would look different further down the line, the authors write.

Initiative Raises Palliative Care Use in Cancer

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Meeting Coverage

Published: Oct 30, 2013

By Charles Bankhead, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco

Action Points

  • Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

TCT: Riskiest Patients Benefit from CoreValve

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Meeting Coverage

Published: Oct 30, 2013 | Updated: Oct 30, 2013

By Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Reviewed by F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE; Instructor of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Action Points

  • Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Inhibition of joint destruction in active psoriatic arthritis

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Studies in monkeys may be next step in search for HIV cure

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By Julie Steenhuysen

CHICAGO | Wed Oct 30, 2013 4:09pm EDT

CHICAGO (Reuters) – A powerful infusion of HIV-fighting antibodies beat back a potent form of the virus in monkeys and kept it at bay for weeks, U.S. government scientists and a team led by Harvard University found, offering a potential next step in the battle against human HIV.

The two studies, published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, involve the use of rare antibodies made by 10 percent to 20 percent of people with HIV that can neutralize a wide array of strains.