Insomnia scans show brain struggles

30 August 2013 Last updated at 19:01 ET

Woman with insomnia

Brain scans of people who say they have insomnia have shown differences in brain function compared with people who get a full night’s sleep.

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, said the poor sleepers struggled to focus part of their brain in memory tests.

Other experts said that the brain’s wiring may actually be affecting perceptions of sleep quality.

The findings were published in the journal Sleep.

People with insomnia struggle to sleep at night, but it also has consequences during the day such as delayed reaction times and memory.

Top Florida health insurer touts Obamacare pain relief

By Tom Brown

MIAMI | Sat Aug 31, 2013 10:01am EDT

MIAMI (Reuters) – Florida’s leading health insurer is reaching out to hundreds of thousands of state residents, touting temporary relief from what it describes as an imminent spike in premium rates due to President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare reform law.

“When the new healthcare law takes effect, you may be surprised how much more you could pay for health insurance,” says an advisory to consumers from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, also known as Florida Blue.

Iowa board votes to end 'tele-med' abortions used by rural women

By Kay Henderson

DES MOINES, Iowa | Fri Aug 30, 2013 7:45pm EDT

DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) – The Iowa Board of Medicine took a final step on Friday to stop Planned Parenthood of the Heartland from providing abortion-inducing drugs to women via a video-conferencing system, a practice used to serve women in rural areas without doctors.

The board voted 8-2 to ban the practice, with most members arguing the best standard of care for a woman seeking an abortion is to have a doctor perform a physical exam and talk face-to-face with the patient.

Iowa board votes to end ‘tele-med’ abortions used by rural women

By Kay Henderson

DES MOINES, Iowa | Fri Aug 30, 2013 7:45pm EDT

DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) – The Iowa Board of Medicine took a final step on Friday to stop Planned Parenthood of the Heartland from providing abortion-inducing drugs to women via a video-conferencing system, a practice used to serve women in rural areas without doctors.

The board voted 8-2 to ban the practice, with most members arguing the best standard of care for a woman seeking an abortion is to have a doctor perform a physical exam and talk face-to-face with the patient.

ESC: Statins May Protect Brain, Eyes

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Meeting Coverage

Published: Aug 31, 2013

By Chris Kaiser, Cardiology Editor, MedPage Today
Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco

Action Points

  • Note that these studies were published as abstracts and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.
  • Statins might help prevent dementia and cataracts, according to two separate studies presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting.

Lab Notes: What Were We Talking About?

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Lab Notes

Published: Aug 30, 2013

A brain protein apparently mediating age-related memory loss (distinct from neurodegenerative disease) holds promise for keeping “senior moments” at bay. Also this week: new tricks from an old drug.

Memory Loss Linked to … Uh …

CDC Details Use of Sleep Meds

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Primary Care

Published: Aug 30, 2013

By John Gever, Deputy Managing Editor, MedPage Today

Some 4% of American adults used prescription sleep medications in the past month, government survey data showed, with the highest rates among women, the elderly, whites, and the college-educated.

Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005 to 2010 indicated that 4.1% of respondents 20 and older said they had used a prescription sleep aid in the previous 30 days, according to a new data brief from the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.

Health Tip: At Risk for Alzheimer’s?

Latest Alzheimers News

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(HealthDay News) — Researchers believe they’ve identified at least some of the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. While there are some factors that you have no control over, you may be able to influence some potential triggers.

The Alzheimer’s Association offers this list of examples:

Management of rheumatoid arthritis just as good with specialist nurses as with doctors

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Nursing / Midwifery;  Primary Care / General Practice
Article Date: 31 Aug 2013 – 0:00 PDT

Current ratings for:
Management of rheumatoid arthritis just as good with specialist nurses as with doctors

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

Patients attending clinical nurse specialist clinics do not get inferior treatment to that offered by consultant rheumatologists, the results of a major new clinical trial have revealed.

Knee osteoarthritis risk unaffected by moderate exercise

Featured Article
Academic Journal
Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Seniors / Aging;  Sports Medicine / Fitness
Article Date: 31 Aug 2013 – 0:00 PDT

Current ratings for:
Knee osteoarthritis risk unaffected by moderate exercise

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

A new study suggests that the risk of middle-aged and older adults developing knee arthritis is unaffected by doing up to 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity, the level recommended by the US goverment.

Researchers from the University of North Carolina (UNC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), came to this conclusion after studying data on over 1,500 participants aged 45 and over.