Weight Gain Common with New Knees

Register Today

Earn Free CME Credits by reading the latest medical news
in your specialty.

Sign Up

38786

By Nancy Walsh, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: May 01, 2013

Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Action Points

  • This study used knee arthroplasty registries and a population-based control sample from the same geographic region to determine whether knee arthroplasty increases the risk of clinically important weight gain over a 5-year postoperative period.
  • Patients undergoing knee arthroplasty were at an increased risk of clinically important weight gain following surgery.

Patients who undergo total knee replacement are at substantial risk for weight gain during the 5 years after the surgery, a large retrospective study showed.

On an adjusted multivariable analysis, recipients of knee arthroplasty were 60% more likely to gain 5% or more of their baseline body weight than matched controls who did not have the procedure (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.2, P=0.003), according to Daniel L. Riddle, PhD, of Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, and colleagues.

And the chance of that “clinically important” weight gain doubled for individuals who had a second arthroplasty during the subsequent 5 years (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.1, P<0.001), the researchers reported in the May Arthritis Care & Research.

“The logical assumption may be that persons who are overweight or obese prior to surgery are more likely to lose weight following surgery. Because there is less pain and improved mobility, the impediments to increased activity and exercise are eased following surgery, and weight loss would logically follow,” they observed.

However, that hasn’t been the case consistently in previous studies, which have been hampered by short follow-up times and a lack of controls.

To provide a more accurate picture of the weight effects of knee replacement over the long term, Riddle and colleagues analyzed outcome data for 917 patients in the Mayo Clinic arthroplasty registry, matching them with 237 controls from the population-based Rochester Epidemiology Project.

A total of 205 of the 917 Mayo patients had a second lower-limb or hip arthroplasty procedure.

Baseline weight was 89.1 kg (196 lbs) in the arthroplasty group and 76.3 kg (168 lbs) in the control group. Two-thirds were women.

In the 5 years after the index date, controls averaged a mean weight loss of 0.35 kg (0.77 lbs), while those who had just one arthroplasty gained an average of 1.23 kg (2.7 lbs).

Those who had a second arthroplasty had a mean weight gain of 2.62 kg (5.77 lbs).

During the first year after the surgery, 22.1% of patients gained 5% or more of their body weight, compared with 16% of controls.

In the fourth year, 32.3% of surgery patients had that percentage weight gain, as did 22.8% of controls.

On univariate analysis, the odds ratio for clinically important weight gain was 1.7 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.3) after surgery, while the odds ratio after a second arthroplasty rose to 2.3 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.2).

Results were similar on multivariable analysis after adjustment for factors such as age, comorbidities, baseline body mass index, and education level.

Factors that were associated with weight gain were:

  • Age below 60, OR 2.7 (95% CI 1.8 to 3.9, P<0.001)
  • Age 60 to 69, OR 1.7 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.3, P=0.004)
  • Weight loss in 5 years before surgery, OR 1.10 per 1 kg (95% CI 1.07 to 1.13, P<0.001)

The finding that previous weight loss was linked with weight gain after the knee replacement had not previously been reported, the researchers noted.

“Intentional weight loss is known to frequently lead to subsequent weight gain, and we suspect this was the case in our sample,” they acknowledged.

Weight control efforts for patients having the surgery should therefore focus on long-term maintenance, they commented.

They also considered it important that younger patients were likely to gain weight after knee replacement, because people in their 50s and 60s in general tend to put on more weight than those who are older.

Moreover, some authors have predicted that in the near future, most of these surgeries will be done on patients younger than 65.

“Multidisciplinary weight loss/maintenance interventions particularly directed to those [total knee arthroplasty] patients who are younger and have lost considerable weight prior to surgery should be considered,” they wrote.

Limitations of the study included considerable loss to follow-up and the possibility of confounding through factors such as smoking and medications that were not measured.

Two of the authors reported receiving funding and support from URL, Savient, Novartis, Takeda, Allergan, Ardea, Osteotech, and Zimmer.

Primary source: Arthritis Care & Research
Source reference:
Riddle D, et al “Clinically important body weight gain following knee arthroplasty: a five-year comparative cohort study” Arthritis Care Res 2013; 65: 669-677.

Sponsored Resources

ADVERTISEMENT

Resources (from Industry)

Video Library

Medical Education (Non-CME)

Most Read Stories

  • Porn Has Effect on Teens’ Sexual Behavior
  • Autism Tied to Valproate in Pregnancy
  • Intestinal Flora May Promote Atherosclerosis
  • Young Teens Not Having Sex
  • Quick Surgery Best for Breast Cancer in the Young
  • More Cancers than Expected in WTC Responders
  • New Diabetes Guidelines Have It Both Ways
  • Diabetes Control Still a Work in Progress
  • SERMs Still Have Value for Breast Ca Prevention
  • Uninsured Ranks Still Growing

ADVERTISEMENT


Visit the Source Site

Mediterranean Diet Might Help Stave Off Dementia

News Picture: Mediterranean Diet Might Help Stave Off DementiaBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimers News

  • Mediterranean Diet Might Help Stave Off Dementia
  • Gene Studies Points to New Alzheimer’s Treatments
  • Alzheimer’s Patients Face Shortage of Neurologists
  • Brain Changes in Alzheimer’s Relatives
  • Exercise May Help People With Alzheimer’s
  • Want More News? Sign Up for MedicineNet Newsletters!

MONDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) — Eating fish, chicken, olive oil and other foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids while staying away from meats and dairy — the so-called Mediterranean diet — may help older adults keep their memory and thinking skills sharp, a large new U.S. study suggests.

Using data from participants enrolled in a nationwide study on stroke, the researchers gleaned diet information from more than 17,000 white and black men and women whose average age was 64.

The participants also took tests that measured their memory and thinking (cognitive) skills. During the four years of the study, 7 percent of the individuals developed problems with these skills, the researchers reported.

“Greater adherence to Mediterranean diet was associated with lower risk of incident cognitive impairment in this large population-based study,” said lead researcher Dr. Georgios Tsivgoulis, from the University of Alabama at Birmingham as well as the University of Athens, in Greece.

There was no evidence of racial or regional differences in response to the diet. However, the diet did not help diabetics ward off mental decline, Tsivgoulis said.

“It may also be that the benefit of a Mediterranean diet differs in people with different diseases,” Tsivgoulis said.

Because there are no definitive treatments for dementia, anything people can do to possibly delay the onset of symptoms, such as modifying their diet, is very important, Tsivgoulis noted.

The report was published in the April 30 issue of Neurology.

An earlier study published in the journal last year suggested that foods rich in omega-3s might help guard against Alzheimer’s disease by affecting levels of a specific substance in the brain.

Dr. Sam Gandy, associate director of the Mount Sinai Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in New York City, said this latest study “is further support for the benefit of Mediterranean diet.”

This important paper should be used to guide clinical practice, he suggested.

“The best way to minimize Alzheimer’s disease is with 30-minute sessions three times a week of brisk walking or weight lifting, maximizing mental activity and a Mediterranean diet,” Gandy said.

“This is the best prescription for maintaining of mental function that we have in hand right now,” he said.

In the study, the investigators found that those who followed the Mediterranean diet were 19 percent less likely to develop thinking and memory problems. This finding was the same for both black and white participants.

The single exception was the 17 percent of the participants who had diabetes. Among these people, the Mediterranean diet didn’t appear to prevent thinking and memory difficulties from developing, the researchers found.

Although the study found a lower rate of these symptoms of early dementia in people who followed a Mediterranean diet, it did not establish a cause-and-effect relationship.

Further research is needed to generalize these results to other groups, and to establish how the Mediterranean diet exerts its neuroprotective effects on mental status, Tsivgoulis said.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCES: Georgios Tsivgoulis, M.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, and University of Athens, Greece; Sam Gandy, M.D., associate director, Mount Sinai Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, New York City; April 30, 2013, Neurology



Visit the Source Site

PFO Stroke Risk May Be Overstated

Register Today

Earn Free CME Credits by reading the latest medical news
in your specialty.

Sign Up

38773

By Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: April 30, 2013

Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner

Action Points

  • In this study, the presence of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography with saline contrast injection in stroke-free individuals over age 39 who were then followed for a mean of 11 years.
  • In this community-based cohort, a PFO was not associated with an increased risk of clinical stroke or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.

Among healthy older adults who were followed for more than a decade, the presence of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) was not associated with ischemic stroke or subclinical cerebrovascular disease, researchers found.

After adjustment for potential confounders, asymptomatic individuals with a PFO were not more likely to have a stroke (hazard ratio 1.10, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.91) or an MRI-detected silent brain infarct (adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.50 to 2.62), according to Marco Di Tullio, MD, of Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues.

A PFO also was not associated with a greater risk of combined vascular events (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.57), the researchers reported online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

The results “suggest that PFO should not be considered a significant risk factor for cerebrovascular events in the general population” and “reaffirm that no preventive treatment is needed in asymptomatic subjects with an incidentally detected PFO,” the authors wrote.

They noted that the findings are consistent with prior population-based studies and discordant with case-control studies in which PFO has been strongly associated with stroke risk.

“The combined information of the negative population studies and positive case-control ones suggests that a small subgroup of individuals with a PFO at high stroke risk may exist, but their effect on the stroke incidence in a general population sample is diluted when all individuals with PFO are considered,” Di Tullio and colleagues wrote, adding that it remains unclear how to identify those high-risk individuals.

In addition, two randomized trials testing whether plugging a PFO would reduce the risk of recurrent stroke failed to show a benefit for the plugged group. The results were reported last year at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics meeting.

The researchers examined the relationship between PFO and both clinical and subclinical cerebrovascular disease among 1,100 stroke-free individuals, older than 39, from the Northern Manhattan Study; a subset of 360 individuals underwent brain MRI scans.

Overall, 14.9% of the cohort had a PFO detected by transthoracic echocardiography. The rate was slightly higher (16.7%) in the subset that underwent brain imaging.

Through an average follow-up of 11 years, 10.1% of the overall cohort had an ischemic stroke — 9.2% of individuals with a PFO and 10.3% of the others without PFO.

The risk of stroke did not differ based on the presence or absence of a PFO after adjustment for age, sex, atrial fibrillation, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking.

Of the individuals who underwent MRI, 14.4% had a silent brain infarct detected — 16.7% of those with a PFO and 14% of the rest. The presence of a PFO was not associated with subclinical cerebrovascular disease after multivariate adjustment.

The findings were consistent regardless of whether the PFO was associated with an atrial septal aneurysm.

In an accompanying editorial, Deeb Salem, MD, and David Thaler, MD, of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, noted that the high average age of the study cohort (about 68) influenced the interpretation of the findings because previous studies have shown a stronger relationship between PFO and stroke in younger individuals.

The weakening of the relationship in older individuals could be related to the increasing presence of various competing causes of stroke.

“Conventional vascular diseases likely ‘drowned out’ the PFO-associated risk that might have been detectable in a study of younger subjects,” Salem and Thaler wrote.

They also pointed to the use of transthoracic echocardiography to detect PFO in the study. That test has been shown to have a sensitivity of only about 50%, making it likely that some of the individuals in the non-PFO group in the current study actually had a PFO, they wrote.

“Unfortunately, these data do not settle this issue [of the association between PFO and stroke],” they wrote.

“If a population at risk from their PFOs is going to be identified before their first stroke, it needs to be done in people who are in their 20s and 30s (and perhaps 40s), with PFO status defined by transesophageal echo or transcranial Doppler and perhaps also described in detail beyond present/absent, and with or without atrial septal aneurysm,” they wrote.

“A focus on asymptomatic subpopulations that may be at higher risk of a first-ever stroke — e.g., migraine with aura, obstructive sleep apnea, and those with silent infarcts — is likely to increase the success of the next population-based study,” they added.

The study was supported in part by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). During the study, Di Tullio was the recipient of a NINDS Mid-Career Award in Patient-Oriented Research.

Di Tullio reported that he had no conflicts of interest. One of his co-authors is a member of the data and safety monitoring board for the RESPECT trial.

Salem and Thaler did not report any financial conflicts of interest.

From the American Heart Association:

Primary source: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Source reference:
Di Tullio M, et al “Patent foramen ovale, subclinical cerebrovascular disease, and ischemic stroke in a population-based cohort” J Am Coll Cardiol 2013.

Additional source: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Source reference:
Salem D, Thaler D “Patent foramen ovale science: keeping the horse in front of the cart” J Am Coll Cardiol 2013.

Related Article(s):

  • PFO Closure Still an Open Question
  • ‘Visual Migraine’ Linked to PFO

Sponsored Resources

ADVERTISEMENT

Resources (from Industry)

Video Library

Medical Education (Non-CME)

Most Read Stories

  • Porn Has Effect on Teens’ Sexual Behavior
  • Autism Tied to Valproate in Pregnancy
  • Intestinal Flora May Promote Atherosclerosis
  • Young Teens Not Having Sex
  • Quick Surgery Best for Breast Cancer in the Young
  • More Cancers than Expected in WTC Responders
  • New Diabetes Guidelines Have It Both Ways
  • Diabetes Control Still a Work in Progress
  • SERMs Still Have Value for Breast Ca Prevention
  • Uninsured Ranks Still Growing

ADVERTISEMENT


Visit the Source Site

Arthritis Setting in to Increasingly Younger Knees

Register Today

Earn Free CME Credits by reading the latest medical news
in your specialty.

Sign Up

38768

By Nancy Walsh, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: April 30, 2013

Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner

Action Points

  • In this analysis, the estimated incidence of diagnosed symptomatic knee osteoarthritis was highest among adults ages 55-64.
  • Almost 10% of the U.S. population will have symptomatic knee osteoarthritis by age 60, according to this analysis.

Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) is now being diagnosed at relatively young ages, and almost one U.S. adult in 10 will develop the disabling condition by age 60, researchers predicted.

A validated computer simulation model estimated that the median age for the diagnosis of knee OA is now 55, according to Elena Losina, PhD, of Harvard University, and colleagues.

In addition, with estimates beginning at age 25, the model predicted a lifetime risk for symptomatic knee OA of 13.83% and a 9.29% risk by age 60 among the general population, the researchers reported in the May Arthritis Care & Research.

“Our findings have important implications for disease prevention and healthcare utilization. The early median age at diagnosis of symptomatic knee OA (55 years) suggests that public health officials should introduce prevention strategies relatively early in the life course,” they stated.

Arthritis in the knees has traditionally been considered an affliction of the elderly, but the increased incidence of obesity and knee trauma in younger individuals is likely to have influenced the pattern of disease onset, the researchers suggested.

To examine this, they collected data on prevalence from the 2007-2008 National Health Interview Survey, and estimated incidence rates in 10-year age groups using the Osteoarthritis Policy Model, which predicts the natural history of the condition, stratifying by gender and obesity.

They found that the estimated prevalence according to age groups was 0.74% for non-obese men ages 25 to 34 and 12.94% for those 85 and older; for obese men the rates were 1.54% and 23.54%, respectively.

For non-obese women, the prevalence rates were 0.88% and 14.97% in the 25 to 34 group and 85 and older group, respectively, while the rates for obese women ranged from 2.41% to 32.45%.

The estimated annual incidence also varied considerably, with the peak annual incidence occurring at ages 55 to 64:

  • Non-obese men, 0.37% (95% CI 0.37 to 0.38)
  • Non-obese women, 0.43% (95% CI 0.43 to 0.43)
  • Obese men, 0.64% (95% CI 0.64 to 0.65)
  • Obese women, 1.02 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.02)

The lifetime risk also differed according to sex and obesity. For example, the risk was 16.4% for women and 11.42% for men, and 19.67% in obese individuals compared with 10.85% for those with normal weight.

The lowest lifetime risk was for non-obese men, at 9.60%, and highest in obese women, at 23.87%.

The findings of this analysis differed from the last report on incidence of knee OA, published almost 2 decades ago, in which the incidence of OA continued to rise up to age 80.

The earlier peak seen in this study is consistent with recent observations that total knee replacement surgeries are occurring at young ages, with 40% of arthroplasties being done in patients before age 65.

The younger age at diagnosis also may reflect an increasing awareness of the condition on the part of both patients and physicians, the researchers noted.

“The early age at diagnosis of symptomatic knee OA may yield high levels of lifetime healthcare utilization and costs. In the last decade, the mean age of persons undergoing [total knee replacement] has decreased from 69 to 66 years and utilization of [total knee replacement] has tripled among U.S. adults ages 45 to 64 years,” Losina and colleagues observed.

“Physicians and policymakers can use our findings to direct resources toward preventing risk factors for knee OA … and can also use our estimates to prepare for the potential future burden on the U.S. healthcare system resulting from the early age at diagnosis of symptomatic knee OA,” they concluded.

Their analysis did have limitations, they acknowledged, such as reliance on self-report of diagnosis and the assumption of consistent incidence rates across 10-year age groups.

The study was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, the Connecticut Healthcare System, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Primary source: Arthritis Care & Research
Source reference:
Losina E, et al “Lifetime risk and age at diagnosis of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in the US” Arthritis Care Res 2013; 65: 703-711.

Related Article(s):

  • AHRQ: Big Jump in Knee Replacement Surgery

Sponsored Resources

ADVERTISEMENT

Resources (from Industry)

Video Library

Medical Education (Non-CME)

Most Read Stories

  • Porn Has Effect on Teens’ Sexual Behavior
  • Autism Tied to Valproate in Pregnancy
  • Intestinal Flora May Promote Atherosclerosis
  • Young Teens Not Having Sex
  • Quick Surgery Best for Breast Cancer in the Young
  • More Cancers than Expected in WTC Responders
  • New Diabetes Guidelines Have It Both Ways
  • Diabetes Control Still a Work in Progress
  • SERMs Still Have Value for Breast Ca Prevention
  • Uninsured Ranks Still Growing

ADVERTISEMENT


Visit the Source Site

Get your blood pressure checked regularly

Do you or does someone you know have high blood pressure? Most likely, your answer is yes. More than one-third of adults in the United States have high blood pressure, and many don’t even know it. High blood pressure increases your risk of heart disease, the #1 killer worldwide, and many other diseases. That’s why it’s important to get your blood pressure checked regularly.

Medicare helps make checking your blood pressure easy. A blood pressure screening is covered in your “Welcome to Medicare” visit and your Yearly Wellness visit at no cost to you.

There are also many ways to prevent and help treat high blood pressure. Eating a healthy diet and avoiding sodium are easy ways to lower blood pressure. Maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active are also important. The surgeon general recommends at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity most days of the week. You can also check your blood pressure between your yearly visits for free at many pharmacies, senior centers, and health fairs.

May is National High Blood Pressure Education Month, watch our video to learn more.

Like this:

Like Loading…


Visit the Source Site

Protect yourself from Hepatitis B

Did you know that 1.2 million people in the U.S. have chronic Hepatitis B, but many more people don’t know they’re infected because they have no symptoms? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness that can lead to liver disease or liver cancer.

Medicare can help keep you protected from Hepatitis B. The best way to prevent Hepatitis B is by getting the Hepatitis B vaccine, which is usually given as 3 shots over a 6-month period. You need to get all 3 shots for complete coverage. If you’re at high or medium risk for Hepatitis B, Medicare Part B will cover Hepatitis B shots for free.

Are you at risk for getting Hepatitis B? If you have hemophilia, End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), diabetes, or certain conditions that lower your resistance to infection, you have a higher risk for getting Hepatitis B increases.  Additionally, if you have a profession that puts you in frequent contact with blood or bodily fluids, you may be at a higher risk.

May is Hepatitis Awareness month. To find out more about preventing and treating Hepatitis B, visit the Centers for Disease Control.

Like this:

Like Loading…


Visit the Source Site

Hydrogen Sulfide Reduces Joint Swelling

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Immune System / Vaccines
Article Date: 01 May 2013 – 1:00 PDT

Current ratings for:
Hydrogen Sulfide Reduces Joint Swelling

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

A gas associated with the smell of rotten eggs has proven to effectively reduce joint swelling, in research which could lead to advances in the treatment of arthritis.

Scientists at the University of Exeter Medical School have discovered that a novel drug molecule, which slowly generates the gas hydrogen sulfide (H2S), effectively reduces swelling and inflammation in arthritic joints.

For years, H2S has been regarded as a highly poisonous by-product which is corrosive, flammable and explosive. But research is now showing an altogether more benign side to the substance.

Professor Matt Whiteman, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said the research, which is published online in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, could pave the way for more effective treatments of arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. Prof Whiteman said: “H2S is widely dismissed as a toxic and foul-smelling environmental pollutant, but it has recently been shown to be created in humans and animals by a specific set of enzymes. Why would the body do this if it had no benefit? Our research has shown that the key to unlocking the therapeutic qualities of H2S is through slow release, mimicking the body’s own production.”

The team has previously shown that H2S levels were increased by up to four times in the knee joints of patients with joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, but intriguingly the higher H2S levels strongly correlated with a lower number of inflammatory cells in the joint. The latest study provides further evidence that the real role for H2S may be to combat inflammation, swelling and joint destruction.

Prof Whiteman added: “A patient will usually visit their doctor with a joint already inflamed, swollen and painful. Since the compound worked after arthritis was established, it may be useful in treating arthritis in the future. Many compounds can prevent arthritis in the laboratory, but of course nobody knows when they will get arthritis. Having a class of compounds which reduce inflammation and swelling when arthritis is already active is extremely exciting. These molecules may also be useful in other inflammatory conditions, and even in the inflammatory aspects of diabetes and obesity.”

The study was part of a large collaboration funded by the Wellcome Trust and Arthritis Research UK, involving Professor Philip K Moore and Dr Julie Keeble from King’s College London, as well as researchers at the National University of Singapore and Queen’s University, Belfast. The team used primary human cells as well as a model of arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis causes some cells to proliferate too quickly in the joint and secrete substances which promote tissue inflammation, swelling and eventually joint destruction. However, the H2S donor molecule prevented this secretion, and inhibited the activity of several enzymes which cause inflation. In the arthritis model, the compound did not prevent arthritis, but was highly effective at reducing joint inflammation and swelling once arthritis was established, suggesting H2S-based compounds may one day be useful in clinic.

The same team has previously found that people who are overweight or have diabetes have lower levels of H2S in their bodies than healthy adults resulting in higher blood pressure, poorer insulin sensitivity and higher levels of sugar in their blood. It has also been reported to promote ulcer healing and reduce lung injury in smokers.

Co-author Dr Mark E Wood, at the University of Exeter, added: “Despite its reputation for being hazardous, H2S could in fact hold the key to solving some of the widespread health problems affecting the country. Our work is a major step in proving that it can be more hero than villain to the human body, providing it is administered in the right way, at the right time. We currently have several more efficient H2S donor molecules being evaluated with collaborators and this is a very exciting time for us.”

Dr Julie Keeble, co-author from King’s College London, commented: “The finding that H2S is able to reduce joint inflammation in experimental models makes it a very exciting prospect for treating arthritis. Many patients with arthritis do not respond effectively to current treatments or suffer side-effects from their medication. We hope that H2S-releasing drugs like the one tested in this study will be effective in treating arthritis without uncomfortable side effects.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our arthritis / rheumatology section for the latest news on this subject.
Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

University of Exeter. “Hydrogen Sulfide Reduces Joint Swelling.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 1 May. 2013. Web.
1 May. 2013. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/259826.php>


APA

University of Exeter. (2013, May 1). “Hydrogen Sulfide Reduces Joint Swelling.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/259826.php.

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Hydrogen Sulfide Reduces Joint Swelling’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


Visit the Source Site