Leeds heart surgery data 'wrong'

30 March 2013 Last updated at 08:48 ET

Leeds General InfirmaryClinicians say the ‘wrong’ data was used by NHS managers

Children’s heart surgery was wrongly suspended at Leeds General Infirmary because of “incomplete” information, a senior doctor has said.

The unit was shut after the NHS medical director said data showed mortality figures were higher than expected.

But cardiologist Elspeth Brown said the data did not include all the operations, and that staff were confident in their clinical work.

NHS managers say various factors contributed to the suspension.

NHS medical director Sir Bruce Keogh said data suggested a death rate twice the national average.

Leeds heart surgery data ‘wrong’

30 March 2013 Last updated at 08:48 ET

Leeds General InfirmaryClinicians say the ‘wrong’ data was used by NHS managers

Children’s heart surgery was wrongly suspended at Leeds General Infirmary because of “incomplete” information, a senior doctor has said.

The unit was shut after the NHS medical director said data showed mortality figures were higher than expected.

But cardiologist Elspeth Brown said the data did not include all the operations, and that staff were confident in their clinical work.

NHS managers say various factors contributed to the suspension.

NHS medical director Sir Bruce Keogh said data suggested a death rate twice the national average.

Cancer survivors deserve ‘care plan’

28 March 2013 Last updated at 21:03 ET

Anxious cancer survivorA survey found that a quarter of cancer survivors feel isolated after treatment

All cancer patients should receive a ‘recovery package’ at the end of their treatment offering ongoing support, the government has announced.

Currently as many as three in four patients do not receive any information on coping with the long-term effects of their illness, figures suggest.

The care plans will identify patients’ financial, mental and physical needs.

Ministers called on the NHS to take “urgent action” to help cancer survivors in England.

HIV, hepatitis tests urged for 7,000 Oklahoma dental patients

By Steve Olafson

OKLAHOMA CITY | Sat Mar 30, 2013 11:24am EDT

OKLAHOMA CITY (Reuters) – A Tulsa, Oklahoma, health center on Saturday began drawing blood samples from patients who may have been exposed to viruses at an oral surgery dental clinic that is under investigation.

As many as 7,000 of Dr. W. Scott Harrington’s patients are being notified by letter that health officials recommend they be tested for hepatitis and HIV.

The investigation began when one of Harrington’s patients tested positive for HIV and Hepatitis C. But a subsequent blood test showed the patient tested positive only for Hepatitis C, said Tulsa health department officials in a press release on Saturday.

Researchers Test Implanted Brain Stimulator for Alzheimer’s

News Picture: Researchers Test Implanted Brain Stimulator for Alzheimer'sBy Barbara Bronson Gray
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimers News

  • Acting Out Dreams During Sleep May Signal Dementia
  • High Blood Pressure May Add to Alzheimer’s Risk
  • A Third of U.S. Seniors Die With Dementia, Study
  • FDA Wants to Relax Approval for Alzheimer’s Drugs
  • Experimental Alzheimer’s Drug Shows Promise, Study
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THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) — Researchers are testing whether applying electrical stimulation directly to the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease might improve thinking, focus and alertness.

Continuing to work with states to build new systems of health coverage

By Cindy Mann CMS Deputy Administrator and Director, Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services

CMS is committed to working in partnership with states in administering their Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP) and to providing flexibility in pursuit of our shared goals.

Premium assistance has been a longstanding option in both Medicaid and CHIP and is one way to accomplish those shared goals.  CMS provided guidance in December of last year on how states might use these options to develop state-based solutions that meet both the state’s unique needs and requirements of the programs

Celiac diagnoses rose during 2000s: study

By Andrew M. Seaman

NEW YORK | Fri Mar 29, 2013 3:41pm EDT

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – The number of Americans diagnosed with celiac disease continued to rise over the past decade but leveled off in 2004, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data on a small but representative sample of people living in Olmsted County, Minnesota, and found that between the years 2000 and 2010, the number of new cases of celiac disease increased from about 11 people per 100,000 to about 17 people per 100,000.