Screening might avert many lung cancer deaths: study

Cigarette butts in an ashtray in Los Angeles, California, May 31, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn

Cigarette butts in an ashtray in Los Angeles, California, May 31, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Alcorn

By Kathryn Doyle

NEW YORK | Wed Feb 27, 2013 4:02pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A calculation based on results from a large lung cancer screening trial projects that 12,000 deaths a year among the highest-risk smokers and ex-smokers in the U.S. could be avoided with a national screening program.

Analysis: Emerging deadly virus demands swift sleuth work

A electron microscope image of a coronavirus is seen in this undated picture provided by the Health Protection Agency in London February 19, 2013. REUTERS/Health Protection Agency/Handout

1 of 2. A electron microscope image of a coronavirus is seen in this undated picture provided by the Health Protection Agency in London February 19, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Health Protection Agency/Handout

By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent

LONDON | Wed Feb 27, 2013 8:34am EST

LONDON (Reuters) – The emergence of a deadly virus previously unseen in humans that has already killed half those known to be infected requires speedy scientific detective work to figure out its potential.

Drug Has Mixed Results in Diastolic HF

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By Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: February 26, 2013

Reviewed by F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE; Instructor of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Action Points

  • This randomized, controlled trial demonstrated echocardiographic, but not clinical improvements in patients with diastolic dysfunction who received spironolactone.
  • Not that the study was underpowered to detect mortality differences.

In patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, spironolactone improved left ventricular diastolic function but did not affect clinical status, the Aldo-DHF trial showed.

Ban smoking in cars, says minister

26 February 2013 Last updated at 10:49 ET

Man smoking in carHealth campaigners have been calling for a ban on smoking in cars

Smoking should be banned in cars carrying children, says England’s public health minister.

Anna Soubry said her personal view was that it was justified on “child welfare” grounds.

The move has been called for by several health groups, although so far the government has resisted.

The prime minister has said while he supports the smoking ban in pubs and clubs, he is “more nervous” about legislating what happens in cars.

Dementia in care homes 'more common'

25 February 2013 Last updated at 19:28 ET

By Nick Triggle Health correspondent, BBC News

Holding handsThe number of people with dementia is on the rise

More than 320,000 of the 400,000 people living in care homes in England, Wales and Northern Ireland now have dementia or severe memory problems, the Alzheimer’s Society charity estimates.

It said the figure was almost 30% higher than previous estimates because of the rise in the ageing population and improvements in data collection.

Of 2,000 adults surveyed, 70% said they would be scared about going to a home.

Dementia in care homes ‘more common’

25 February 2013 Last updated at 19:28 ET

By Nick Triggle Health correspondent, BBC News

Holding handsThe number of people with dementia is on the rise

More than 320,000 of the 400,000 people living in care homes in England, Wales and Northern Ireland now have dementia or severe memory problems, the Alzheimer’s Society charity estimates.

It said the figure was almost 30% higher than previous estimates because of the rise in the ageing population and improvements in data collection.

Of 2,000 adults surveyed, 70% said they would be scared about going to a home.

FDA halts trials of Amgen drug in children, cites death

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Analysis & Opinion

Switzerland's Roche pledges to open up access to drug data

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The logo of the Swiss drugmaker Roche is seen on a factory in Burgdorf near Bern November 17, 2010. REUTERS/Pascal Lauener

The logo of the Swiss drugmaker Roche is seen on a factory in Burgdorf near Bern November 17, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Pascal Lauener

Tue Feb 26, 2013 12:48pm EST

* Says will give third-party researchers access to trial data

* Follows GSK decision to publish reports and data

* Drugmakers under pressure to increase transparency

ZURICH (Reuters) – Swiss drugmaker Roche Holding has agreed to expand access to its clinical trial data as the pharmaceutical industry faces calls for greater transparency on scientific data.

Switzerland’s Roche pledges to open up access to drug data

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The logo of the Swiss drugmaker Roche is seen on a factory in Burgdorf near Bern November 17, 2010. REUTERS/Pascal Lauener

The logo of the Swiss drugmaker Roche is seen on a factory in Burgdorf near Bern November 17, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Pascal Lauener

Tue Feb 26, 2013 12:48pm EST

* Says will give third-party researchers access to trial data

* Follows GSK decision to publish reports and data

* Drugmakers under pressure to increase transparency

ZURICH (Reuters) – Swiss drugmaker Roche Holding has agreed to expand access to its clinical trial data as the pharmaceutical industry faces calls for greater transparency on scientific data.

USPSTF: Vitamin D and Calcium Don’t Stop Fractures

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Download Complimentary Source PDF 
By Charles Bankhead, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: February 25, 2013

Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco

Action Points

  • Current evidence does not support supplementation with daily vitamin D or calcium to reduce the risk of fractures in adults, according to the United States Preventive Services Task Force.
  • Note that supplementation at or below 400 IU of vitamin D3 and 1,000 mg of calcium conveys a slightly increased risk for renal stones.