Cialis Assists Men With Problems Ejaculating And Achieving An Orgasm, Regardless Of Severity Of Their ED

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Article Date: 01 Feb 2013 – 0:00 PST

Current ratings for:
Cialis Assists Men With Problems Ejaculating And Achieving An Orgasm, Regardless Of Severity Of Their ED

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

New data suggests the erectile dysfunction (ED) drug Cialis may also be beneficial in helping men who have problems with ejaculation and orgasm, report researchers from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in the February issue of the British Journal of Urology International. Cialis is currently approved for the treatment of ED, benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) and for treatment of men with both conditions.

Their study, a meta-analysis of 17 double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of men with ED, is the first to analyze the benefit an agent like Cialis offers for common issues of sexual dysfunction that may have little to do with ED. Their study concluded that approximately 70 percent of men who used Cialis during sexual activity for 12 weeks were able to ejaculate most of the time and to reach orgasm, compared to 30 percent in the placebo group. Also, these benefits from the drug were seen despite the level of a man’s ED severity.

“There are many men who have, at most, very mild problems achieving an erection but who cannot easily ejaculate,” says the study’s lead author, Dr. Darius Paduch, a urologist and male sexual medicine specialist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell and director of Sexual Health and Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. “Our study shows Cialis works very well for these men with problems ejaculating.”

Dr. Paduch says up to 18 percent of men have a normal erection but don’t ejaculate, or take a long time to do so. He adds that while the issue may be more prevalent in the elderly, it affects men of all ages.

“Many of my patients are young men who want to have children and so they want to solve their issues with ejaculation,” says Dr. Paduch, who is also an associate professor of urology and reproductive medicine at Weill Cornell. “We don’t know why this occurs. Every internist faces this problem in his male patients and has no options to offer. Our study shows Cialis may help.”

Men with No ED Can Have Sexual Dysfunction

Dr. Paduch and his colleagues have long researched issues of sexual dysfunction that extend beyond ED. “Erectile dysfunction isn’t the whole story, by any means,” he says.

A 2011 study led by Dr. Paduch helped clarify the issue. The largest analysis to date of orgasmic and ejaculatory dysfunction, also published in the British Journal of Urology International, followed nearly 12,130 men with mild to severe ED and found that 65 percent of the participants were unable to have an orgasm and 58 percent had problems with ejaculation. Even men with no or very minimal ED reported poor ejaculatory function (17 percent) and poor ability to have an orgasm (22 percent). At the time, Dr. Paduch pointed out that approximately 30 million American men – half of all men aged 40 to 70 – have trouble achieving or sustaining an erection. “While medications like Viagra and Cialis have been successful in helping many of these men, our research suggests there are other common sexual issues that remain largely unaddressed,” he said in 2011.

Non-erectile sexual dysfunction is underreported and undertreated due to social stigma and, in particular, misunderstandings about the physiology of male sexual response and orgasmic dysfunction, Dr. Paduch says. “For decades it was believed that only women had problems with orgasm, but our research shows that orgasmic dysfunction could be as prevalent among men as it is among women.”

In this new study, Dr. Paduch and his colleagues examined data from 17 placebo-controlled 12-week trials of Cialis, given at different doses. These studies included 3,581 participants with a mean age of 54.9, including 1,512 men with severe ejaculatory dysfunction (EJD) and 1,812 with severe orgasmic dysfunction (OD). In some cases, patients with one or both of these conditions reported only mild or moderate ED.

The researchers examined the study participants’ responses on questionnaires about the effect Cialis had on ED, EJD, and OD, among other measures of sexual satisfaction. The original questionnaire was primarily focused on the effects of Cialis on ED, but provided valuable additional information.

They found that treatment with Cialis (10 or 20 milligrams taken as needed) was associated with significant increase in ejaculatory and orgasmic function across all levels of severity of ED, EJD and OD, compared to use of a placebo agent.

For example, 66 percent of men with severe EJD and 66 percent with severe OD who used Cialis reported improved ejaculatory function, compared with 36 percent and 35 percent, respectively, in the placebo group. Also, patients with moderate dysfunction also experienced significant improvements with Cialis, Dr. Paduch reports.

“More study is needed, but we are hopeful our findings may lead to a treatment for many men who cannot now achieve sexual satisfaction,” Dr. Paduch says.

View drug information on Cialis; Viagra.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our erectile dysfunction / premature ejaculation section for the latest news on this subject.
Other study co-authors include Alexander Bolyakov, a research associate in the Department of Urology at Weill Cornell, and Paula K. Polzer and Steven Watts, the study’s senior investigator, both of Lilly Research Laboratories of Eli Lilly.
This research study was funded by Eli Lilly and Company, the manufacturer of Cialis.
Study authors Dr. Paduch and Bolyakov are funded study investigators and consultants for Eli Lilly. In addition, Polzer and Watts are employees of, and minor shareholders in, Eli Lilly.
Weill Cornell Medical College
Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Cialis Assists Men With Problems Ejaculating And Achieving An Orgasm, Regardless Of Severity Of Their ED.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 1 Feb. 2013. Web.
1 Feb. 2013. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255632.php>


APA

n.p. (2013, February 1). “Cialis Assists Men With Problems Ejaculating And Achieving An Orgasm, Regardless Of Severity Of Their ED.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255632.php.

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


Visit the Source Site

Mesoblast Receives FDA Clearance For Phase 2 Clinical Trial Of Mesenchymal Precursor Cells In Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Regulatory Affairs / Drug Approvals;  Clinical Trials / Drug Trials
Article Date: 01 Feb 2013 – 2:00 PST

Current ratings for:
Mesoblast Receives FDA Clearance For Phase 2 Clinical Trial Of Mesenchymal Precursor Cells In Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated


Trial will be randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled dose escalation study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of a single intravenous infusion of two MPC dose levels over an initial period of 3 months in patients who have had poor or incomplete responses to biologic inhibitors of the TNF-alpha pathway
Regenerative medicine company Mesoblast Limited (ASX:MSB; USOTC:MBLTY), today announced that it has received clearance from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to commence a Phase 2 clinical trial evaluating a single intravenous infusion of allogeneic, or “off-the-shelf”, Mesenchymal Precursor Cells (MPCs) for the treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis.  

The randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial is expected to commence during the second quarter 2013, and will recruit across multiple sites in the United States and Australia. The trial will compare the effects of a single intravenous infusion of allogeneic MPCs dosed at 1 or 2 million cells/kg compared with placebo in 48 patients who have had an incomplete or inadequate response to a biologic inhibitor of the TNF-alpha pathway for active rheumatoid arthritis. Safety and effectiveness of the MPC therapy will be assessed at multiple time points with the primary endpoints defined as 3 months.  

RA is an autoimmune disease caused by aberrant activation of multiple immune pathways involving both monocytes and T cells, ultimately resulting in joint destruction. Existing biologic treatments target only single immune pathways, resulting in incomplete responses, need for chronic administration, and potentially unacceptable infectious adverse events.  

In contrast, Mesoblast’s MPCs have been shown in preclinical studies to have a broad immunomodulatory mechanism of action (MOA), simultaneously inhibiting T cells and monocytes involved in inflammation and autoimmunity. The broader effects of Mesoblast’s MPCs on multiple immune pathways suggest that they may be particularly useful agents for reducing the inflammation and permanent joint damage associated with progression of RA.  

In a randomized, placebo-controlled study in 30 sheep with collagen-induced arthritis, a model that manifests joint damage characteristic of human RA, treatment with Mesoblast’s MPCs resulted in reduced TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-17 in the diseased joint. In comparison with saline treated controls, synovial tissue from arthritic sheep 30 days after receiving a single intravenous injection of 2 million MPCs/kg showed 88% reduction in IL-6 levels (p=0.029), 83% reduction in TNF-alpha levels (p=0.049), 53% reduction in IL-17 levels (p=0.005), and 43% reduction in infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (p=0.018). MPC-treated animals had a 31% reduction in histopathology severity scores compared with controls (p <0.025).  

These findings show that MPCs can concomitantly inhibit both Th17 T cells and pro-inflammatory monocytes, and improve synovial tissue pathology. This provides a rationale for their potential use as both a first-line biologic treatment in those not responding to conventional anti-rheumatic agents and in patients with incomplete responses to biologic inhibitors of the TNF-alpha pathway alone.  

Mesoblast Chief Executive Professor Silviu Itescu said: “We believe that the broad immunomodulatory effects of our MPCs could provide a tangible benefit to patients with debilitating autoimmune diseases, including RA. This is the first in a series of programs designed to establish the credentials of our intravenous product formulation for a broad-based spectrum of inflammatory and immunologic conditions.”  

About Rheumatoid Arthritis

RA is a chronic systemic disease characterized by progressive joint deformity and joint destruction driven by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia in which cytokines play central pathogenic roles.

The prevalence of RA is estimated to be 0.8% worldwide, with women twice as likely to develop the disease as men. In the United States, RA afflicts 1.3 million people. It is responsible for 250,000 hospitalizations and 9 million physician visits each year. According to Global Data, the RA therapeutics market was valued at $10.3 billion globally in 2010, and has doubled over a four-year period after growing at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 12.3%.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our arthritis / rheumatology section for the latest news on this subject.
Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Mesoblast Receives FDA Clearance For Phase 2 Clinical Trial Of Mesenchymal Precursor Cells In Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 1 Feb. 2013. Web.
1 Feb. 2013. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255693.php>


APA

n.p. (2013, February 1). “Mesoblast Receives FDA Clearance For Phase 2 Clinical Trial Of Mesenchymal Precursor Cells In Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255693.php.

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


Visit the Source Site

Insight Into The Mechanics Of Arthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Medical Devices / Diagnostics
Article Date: 01 Feb 2013 – 0:00 PST

Current ratings for:
Insight Into The Mechanics Of Arthritis

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

A new, noninvasive, and low-cost method for the early detection and monitoring of osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by wear and tear) may be on its way, thanks to research by UC Santa Barbara scientists from the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department of Materials.

By studying patterns of friction between cartilage pads, the researchers discovered a different type of friction that is more likely to cause wear and damage. Their work suggests ways to detect this friction, and points to new research directions for getting to the root cause of arthritis. The findings are published in the recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Imagine going to the doctor for your aching knees. For some, this may involve uncomfortable needle sticks to draw blood for lab tests, or the extraction of the fluid surrounding the aching joint. But what if your doctor could actually listen to your body, monitoring the way your knees sound as they bend and flex? Research by Jacob Israelachvili, UCSB professor of chemical engineering and materials science; grad student researcher Dong Woog Lee; and postdoctoral researcher Xavier Banquy says that it’s possible.

For their work, they used an instrument called a Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA), a device that measures the adhesion and friction forces between surfaces, in this case cartilage – the pad of tissue that covers the ends of bones at a joint. The degeneration of cartilage is the most common cause of osteoarthritis – the pads wear away, leaving bone grinding against bone.

What the researchers found is that it isn’t just any kind of friction that leads to the irreversible wear and tear on the material. “It is currently believed that a high-friction force, or ‘coefficient of friction,’ is the primary factor in surface wear and damage,” said Israelachvili. “What we found is that this is not the case.”

The critical feature is not a high-friction force, but what is known as “stick-slip” friction, or, sometimes, “stiction.” Both are characterized by surfaces that initially stick together, and then accelerate away quickly once the static friction force is overcome. With stick-slip friction, the surfaces eventually pull slightly apart and slide across each other, stick again, and pull apart, causing jerky movements.

“That’s when things get damaged microscopically,” said Israelachvili.

Stick-slip is a common phenomenon. It is responsible for everything from computer hard drive crashes and automobile failures, to squeaking doors and music.

“The same thing happens with a violin string: Even if you’re pulling the bow steadily, it’s moving in hundreds or thousands of little jerks per second, which determine the sound you hear,” Israelachvili said. Each little jerk, no matter how submicroscopic, is an impact, and over time the accumulation of these impacts can deform surfaces, causing irreparable damage – first microscopically, then growing to macroscopic (large, visible) dimensions. That’s when you have to change the string.

But it’s not easy to tell the difference between types of friction at the microscopic level, where it all begins. Smooth-sliding joints might feel the same as those undergoing stiction, or the even more harmful stick-slip, especially in the early stages of arthritis. But, when measured with an ultra-sensitive and high-resolution instrument like the SFA, each type of friction revealed its own characteristic profile: Smooth-sliding joints yielded an almost smooth constant line (friction force or friction trace); joints with stiction showed up as a peak, as the “sticking” was being overcome, followed by a relatively smooth line; while stick-slip shows the jagged saw-tooth profile of two surfaces repeatedly pulling apart, sticking, and pulling apart again. According to the scientists, these measurements could be recorded by placing an acoustic or electric sensing device around joints, giving a signal similar to an EKG.

“With a well-designed sensor, this could be a good way to measure and diagnose damage to the cartilage,” said Banquy. It could be used to measure the progression, or even the early detection of symptoms related to arthritis.

For a country that’s facing a geriatric population explosion, dealing with issues associated with old age is no small matter. Early detection of conditions like arthritis has been a priority for many years, as baby boomers advance in age.

However, the functioning of joints is more complicated, said Israelachvili. The scientists will continue their work by studying synovial fluid – the lubricating fluid between two cartilage surfaces in joints – that also plays a major role in whether or not the surfaces wear and tear, and the synergistic roles of the different molecules (proteins, lipids, and polymers) that are all involved in lubricating and preventing damage to our joints.

“There are a number of directions to take, both fundamental and practical,” Israelachvili said. “But it looks as if we need to focus our research on finding ways to prevent stick-slip motion, rather than lowering the friction force.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our arthritis / rheumatology section for the latest news on this subject.
Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Insight Into The Mechanics Of Arthritis.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 1 Feb. 2013. Web.
1 Feb. 2013. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255629.php>


APA

n.p. (2013, February 1). “Insight Into The Mechanics Of Arthritis.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255629.php.

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Insight Into The Mechanics Of Arthritis’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


Visit the Source Site