Video games 'help dyslexic pupils'

28 February 2013 Last updated at 12:38 ET

Boys playing computer games

Playing video games may help children with dyslexia improve their reading skills, research suggests.

A study of 10-year-olds who played 12 hours of an “action” video game found it improved their reading speed without any cost to accuracy.

The effects were equivalent to more than a year’s worth of reading development, the Italian team reported in Current Biology.

But more research was needed before games could be considered a treatment.

Their work builds on earlier research in which they linked dyslexia with early problems in visual attention rather than language skills.

Video games ‘help dyslexic pupils’

28 February 2013 Last updated at 12:38 ET

Boys playing computer games

Playing video games may help children with dyslexia improve their reading skills, research suggests.

A study of 10-year-olds who played 12 hours of an “action” video game found it improved their reading speed without any cost to accuracy.

The effects were equivalent to more than a year’s worth of reading development, the Italian team reported in Current Biology.

But more research was needed before games could be considered a treatment.

Their work builds on earlier research in which they linked dyslexia with early problems in visual attention rather than language skills.

FDA staff say two non-hormonal hot flashes drugs show some efficacy

A view shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) logo at the lobby of its headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland August 14, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A view shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) logo at the lobby of its headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland August 14, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Jason Reed

Thu Feb 28, 2013 1:44pm EST

(Reuters) – Food and Drug Administration staff said experimental drugs by Depomed Inc and Hisamitsu Pharmaceutical Co Inc showed efficacy in reducing menopausal hot flashes, and highlighted no new risks in comments issued on Thursday.

Depomed’s shares rose 8 percent on optimism that its drug, which failed to meet pre-defined efficacy goals in studies, may still be approved to address an estimated $1.5 billion market.

No clear benefits for kids’ blood pressure checks

By Genevra Pittman

NEW YORK | Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:56pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – There’s no evidence that checking kids’ and teens’ blood pressure – and treating them if it’s high – can reduce their heart risks in adulthood, according to a new analysis.

What’s more, researchers found blood pressure tests may not always be accurate among young people, or consistent from one reading to the next.

“At this point, the jury is out. We just don’t know if this is worth doing or not,” said Dr. Matthew Thompson, who led the new research at Oxford University in the UK.

Imaging Suggests Wide Window for Alzheimer’s Tx

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Alzheimer’s Disease

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By Charles Bankhead, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: February 27, 2013

Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Action Points

  • This study used serial amyloid PET imaging to model rates of beta-amyloid accumulation.
  • Low rates of accumulation were observed in those with the lowest and highest baseline amyloid burden, whereas amyloid accumulation was highest in those with mid-range baseline amyloid levels.

Fatal MI More Likely After Sibling Dies

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By Crystal Phend, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: February 27, 2013

Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Action Points

  • Because the death of sibling is a stressful life event, this study looked at the association between loss of an adult sibling and mortality from myocardial infarction up to 18 years since bereavement.
  • The study provided found evidence for mortality from myocardial infarction associated with the death of a sibling at adult age.

Poison probe nurse is suspended

27 February 2013 Last updated at 08:26 ET

Breaking news

A nurse cleared of poisoning patients at a hospital has been suspended for three months after admitting taking drugs from the site.

The decision came after a three-day disciplinary hearing for Rebecca Leighton, 29, who worked at Stepping Hill Hospital in Stockport.

She has been suspended from nursing by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

Ms Leighton spent six weeks in jail but was freed as there was not enough evidence against her.


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Exam error prompts doctor job recall

27 February 2013 Last updated at 11:04 ET

Junior doctorMedical students are having to wait to find out the location of their first job

Thousands of medical students face having their first hospital job offer withdrawn due to marking errors in their exams.

On Monday more than 7,000 final year students were told the region they were assigned to as junior doctors.

However, a day later the examining body, the UK Foundation Programme Office (UKFPO), withdrew all offers due to flaws in the scoring system.

The British Medical Association says the situation is “unacceptable”.