Vitamin Drinks for Beautiful Skin – Do They Work?

The Truth About Beauty Beverages

Do certain drinks deliver beauty benefits — or is that wishful thinking? Experts weigh in.

Reviewed by Emmy M. Graber, MD

“Beauty beverages” have flooded the market in recent years, promising to transform humble water into a powerful anti-aging, skin perfecting potion.

According to market research firm Mintel, nearly 300 new food and drink products with “functional beauty benefits” launched in 2008, about double the number in 2007. Products like Borba, Glowelle, Crystal Light Skin Essentials, BeautyScoop, and Noah’s Naturals Anti-Aging Beauty Elixir all claim to improve appearance and fight the signs of time on your skin.

But can what you drink really make a difference in how you look?

What Are Beauty Beverages?

“Just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder, a beauty drink is in the perspective of the consumer,” says New York nutritionist Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN.

“Drinks with beauty benefits usually contain vitamins, amino acids, or botanicals that possess antioxidant activities,” says New York dermatologist Francesca Fusco, MD. “A person should usually get enough of these nutrients through diet. But drinking them is a reasonable way to supplement.”

How Well Do They Work?

There are nutrients that can improve skin health, but the jury is out on how effective a beauty beverage can be at shuttling this nutrition straight to your skin.

Ideally, everyone would eat a healthy diet packed with fruits and vegetables, lean protein, good fats, and whole grains, says Los Angeles dermatologist Howard Murad, MD, who sells supplements as part of his skincare line. He sees supplements as a good back-up plan.

“I have tried to put adequate amounts of supplements in drinks, but they aren’t palatable at the levels required to see benefits,” Murad says. “Plus, to make a supplement drinkable, you need to add preservatives, emulsifiers, and sweeteners — things that aren’t ideal to ingest.”

The makers of beauty drinks say that sometimes eating well isn’t enough. “Even people who eat a healthy diet have problems with their skin, hair, and nails,” says plastic surgeon Michelle Yagoda, MD, creator of BeautyScoop. “So absorption can be a problem and liquids tend to be more bio-available to your body.”

“A drinkable supplement can be an effective way to treat skin because it can contain vitamins that are more bio-available and easier for the body to absorb,” says Scott-Vincent Borba, founder and CEO of the skin product company Borba.

However, experts such as New York dermatologist Neal Schultz, MD, disagree. “Certain nutrients do help the skin, but that doesn’t mean putting them in a drink will have the same effect as eating a well-balanced diet,” Schultz says. “The body is too smart for that.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers. Five Filters recommends: Gaza Blitz – Turmoil And Tragicomedy At The BBC.

Visit the Source Site

New Design Technique Could Enable Personalized Medicine, Studies Of Brain Wiring

Main Category: Neurology / Neuroscience
Also Included In: Medical Devices / Diagnostics
Article Date: 03 Dec 2012 – 0:00 PST

Current ratings for:
New Design Technique Could Enable Personalized Medicine, Studies Of Brain Wiring

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

Borrowing from microfabrication techniques used in the semiconductor industry, MIT and Harvard Medical School (HMS) engineers have developed a simple and inexpensive way to create three-dimensional brain tissues in a lab dish.

The new technique yields tissue constructs that closely mimic the cellular composition of those in the living brain, allowing scientists to study how neurons form connections and to predict how cells from individual patients might respond to different drugs. The work also paves the way for developing bioengineered implants to replace damaged tissue for organ systems, according to the researchers.

“We think that by bringing this kind of control and manipulation into neurobiology, we can investigate many different directions,” says Utkan Demirci, an assistant professor in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST).

Demirci and Ed Boyden, associate professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences at MIT’s Media Lab and McGovern Institute, are senior authors of a paper describing the new technique, which appears in the Nov. 27 online edition of the journal Advanced Materials. The paper’s lead author is Umut Gurkan, a postdoc at HST, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

‘Unique challenges’

Although researchers have had some success growing artificial tissues such as liver or kidney, “the brain presents some unique challenges,” Boyden says. “One of the challenges is the incredible spatial heterogeneity. There are so many kinds of cells, and they have such intricate wiring.”

Brain tissue includes many types of neurons, including inhibitory and excitatory neurons, as well as supportive cells such as glial cells. All of these cells occur at specific ratios and in specific locations.

To mimic this architectural complexity in their engineered tissues, the researchers embedded a mixture of brain cells taken from the primary cortex of rats into sheets of hydrogel. They also included components of the extracellular matrix, which provides structural support and helps regulate cell behavior.

Those sheets were then stacked in layers, which can be sealed together using light to crosslink hydrogels. By covering layers of gels with plastic photomasks of varying shapes, the researchers could control how much of the gel was exposed to light, thus controlling the 3-D shape of the multilayer tissue construct.

This type of photolithography is also used to build integrated circuits onto semiconductors – a process that requires a photomask aligner machine, which costs tens of thousands of dollars. However, the team developed a much less expensive way to assemble tissues using masks made from sheets of plastic, similar to overhead transparencies, held in place with alignment pins.

The tissue cubes can be made with a precision of 10 microns, comparable to the size of a single cell body. At the other end of the spectrum, the researchers are aiming to create a cubic millimeter of brain tissue with 100,000 cells and 900 million connections.

Answering fundamental questions

Because the tissues include a diverse repertoire of brain cells, occurring in the same ratios as they do in natural brain tissue, they could be used to study how neurons form the connections that allow them to communicate with each other.

“In the short term, there’s a lot of fundamental questions you can answer about how cells interact with each other and respond to environmental cues,” Boyden says.

As a first step, the researchers used these tissue constructs to study how a neuron’s environment might constrain its growth. To do this, they placed single neurons in gel cubes of different sizes, then measured the cells’ neurites, long extensions that neurons use to communicate with other cells. It turns out that under these conditions, neurons get “claustrophobic,” Demirci says. “In small gels, they don’t necessarily send out as long neurites as they would in a five-times-larger gel.”

In the long term, the researchers hope to gain a better understanding of how to design tissue implants that could be used to replace damaged tissue in patients. Much research has been done in this area, but it has been difficult to figure out whether the new tissues are correctly wiring up with existing tissue and exchanging the right kinds of information.

Another long-term goal is using the tissues for personalized medicine. One day, doctors may be able to take cells from a patient with a neurological disorder and transform them into induced pluripotent stem cells, then induce these constructs to grow into neurons in a lab dish. By exposing these tissues to many possible drugs, “you might be able to figure out if a drug would benefit that person without having to spend years giving them lots of different drugs,” Boyden says.

Other authors of the paper are Yantao Fan, a visiting graduate student at HMS and HST; Feng Xu and Emel Sokullu Urkac, postdocs at HMS and HST; Gunes Parlakgul, a visiting medical student at HMS and HST; MIT graduate students Jacob Bernstein and Burcu Erkmen; and Wangli Xing, a professor at Tsinghua University.

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Paul Allen Family Foundation, the New York Stem Cell Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Institute of Engineering and Technology A.F. Harvey Prize, and MIT Lincoln Laboratory.

Written by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “New Design Technique Could Enable Personalized Medicine, Studies Of Brain Wiring.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 3 Dec. 2012. Web.
3 Dec. 2012. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/253438.php>


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers. Five Filters recommends: Gaza Blitz – Turmoil And Tragicomedy At The BBC.

Visit the Source Site

Scientists Find Early Immune Trigger Of MS

Featured Article
Academic Journal
Main Category: Multiple Sclerosis
Also Included In: Biology / Biochemistry;  Medical Devices / Diagnostics;  Neurology / Neuroscience
Article Date: 02 Dec 2012 – 7:00 PST

Current ratings for:
Scientists Find Early Immune Trigger Of MS

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

Using advanced imaging to observe the early stages of nerve damage in mice with MS, scientists in the US believe they have found an important early trigger for the disease: the leakage of a clotting protein across the blood-brain barrier that activates an immune response and results in a toxic environment that damages nerve cells. Through genetic modification, they also found a way to stop the protein triggering the immune response without impairing its ability to clot blood.

A report of the study, led by the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease at the University of California – San Francisco (UCSF), was published online in Nature Communications on 27 November 2012.

Researchers Just Starting to Understand Causes and Processes of MS

There are 2 million people worldwide living with MS, a disease that develops when the body’s immune system attacks the brain, spinal cord and optic nerve. The attack damages nerve cells, including the myelin sheath that ensures they can send signals to each other via connecting filaments called axons.

As the damage ensues, the nerve signals get weaker and weaker and eventually don’t reach the other end, causing a host of symptoms such as numbness, fatigue, difficulty walking, paralysis and loss of vision.

There are drugs that delay the symptoms, but none that removes the underlying cause, which researchers are only just starting to understand.

A new study recently reported in Nature Biotechnology, describes how scientists used nanoparticles to stop MS in mice.

Real-Time Imaging

In this latest UCSF-led study, the team used a high-resolution, real-time imaging technique called “in vivo two-photon microscopy”, to observe individual cells in the living brains and spinal cords of mice engineered to develop a disease that mimics the human form of MS.

Traditional imaging techniques only show “snapshots” of the damage that MS can do.

With their latest methods, senior author Katerina Akassoglou, a professor in neurology at UCSF, and her team could see what happens to nerve cells over different stages of the disease.

Akassoglou, who also directs the Gladstone Center for In Vivo Imaging Research, says in a press statement:

“To successfully treat MS, we must first identify what triggers the disease and what enables its progression.”

Leakage of Fibrinogen Causes Neurotoxic Environment for Nerve Cells

Akassoglou and colleagues saw that when there is a disruption in the blood brain barrier, it allows blood proteins to seep into the brain.

One of these proteins is a blood-clotting protein called fibrinogen. When it arrives in the brain it immediately activates a strong immune response from microglia cells, the immune system’s first line of defence.

The microglia release large amounts of chemically reactive molecules called “reactive oxygen species”. These are what create a toxic environment in the brain that results in damage to nerve cells that is seen in MS.

“Here, we have shown that the leakage of blood in the brain acts as an early trigger that sets off the brain’s inflammatory response – creating a neurotoxic environment that damages nerve cells,” says Akassoglou.

Lead author Dimitrios Davalos, a Gladstone staff research scientist and associate director of the imaging center, says the in vivo imaging analysis let them observe in real-time which of the molecules crossed the blood-brain barrier, and notes:

“Importantly, this analysis helped us identify the protein fibrinogen as the key culprit in MS, by demonstrating how its entry into the brain through leaky blood vessels impacted the health of individual nerve cells.”

Targeting Fibrinogen

The team also found a way to stop the leakage: they genetically modified the fibrinogen in the MS mice. The modified protein didn’t trigger the microglia response, and so no toxic environment was created. However, the protein was still able to carry out its blood-clotting role.

The treated mice did not show the same progressive nerve cell damage seen with MS.

Akassoglou says “targeting the fibrinogen-microglia interactions to halt nerve-cell damage could be a new therapeutic strategy”.

She and her team are currenlty investigating ways to specifically target the damaging effects of fibrinogen in the brain.

“We also continue to use in vivo imaging techniques to further enhance our understanding of what triggers the initiation and progression of MS,” notes Akassoglou.

Funding for the study came from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the American Heart Association, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Nancy Davis Foundation for Multiple Sclerosis, the Dana Program in Brain and Immuno-Imaging, H. Lundbeck A/S, the National Institutes of Health, and other sources.

Written by Catharine Paddock PhD
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our multiple sclerosis section for the latest news on this subject.
“Fibrinogen-induced perivascular microglial clustering is required for the development of axonal damage in neuroinflammation”; Dimitrios Davalos, Jae Kyu Ryu, Mario Merlini, Kim M. Baeten, Natacha Le Moan, Mark A. Petersen, Thomas J. Deerinck, and others; Nature Communications 3, Article number: 1227; published online 27 November 2012; DOI:10.1038/ncomms2230; Link to Article
Additional sources: UCSF News Center; NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Scientists Find Early Immune Trigger Of MS.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 2 Dec. 2012. Web.
2 Dec. 2012. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/253491.php>


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers. Five Filters recommends: Gaza Blitz – Turmoil And Tragicomedy At The BBC.

Visit the Source Site

More Sleep May Help Some People Feel Less Pain

Dec. 1, 2012 — Not getting enough sleep? Some extra Zzzs each night may improve more than just your daytime alertness. New research shows more sleep may also improve your ability to withstand pain.

In fact, sleepy volunteers who got about two hours more sleep per night for four nights showed improvements in a test measuring pain sensitivity. Participants who got more sleep were also a lot more alert during the daytime.

“If you are already sleeping eight hours a night, you probably don’t need more sleep,” says researcher Thomas Roth, PhD. He is director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. But “if you spend six hours in bed a night, spend eight — preferably nine,” he says.  

The National Sleep Foundation recommends adults get seven to nine hours of sleep each night.

“For people who don’t get enough sleep, sleeping longer decreases pain sensitivity,” he says. This likely holds for all types of pain, including chronic back pain and other painful disorders, Roth says.

More Sleep Equals Less Pain

The study included 18 healthy adults aged 21 to 35 who did not have any pain. Half spent 10 hours in bed for four nights, and the others kept to their usual nighttime bed schedules.  People in the extended sleep group raked in close to two hours more sleep per night due to their new bedtime ritual, an average of 8.9 hours per night vs. 7.14 hours per night among those who kept their own schedule.

The researchers measured pain by how long participants could keep a finger held to a heat source. The amount increased by 25% in those in the extended sleep group after just four days. Previous research suggests this is comparable to taking a 60-mg dose twice a day of the painkiller codeine.

Exactly how more sleep can help improve pain is not fully understood. “We think that sleep loss and pain both increase levels of inflammatory markers, but getting more sleep may help decrease this inflammation,” Roth says.

The next step is to look at people getting ready for surgery to see if treating any underlying sleep issues can affect their pain sensitivity and the amount of painkillers they require, Roth says.

The findings appear in December issue of Sleep.

“When they extended their sleep, participants were able to withstand a greater time before they withdrew their fingers form heat,” says Harley Greenberg, MD. He is the medical director of the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Sleep Disorders Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. But “it is a big jump to apply this to patients with chronic pain syndrome.”

The study period was brief, and getting more sleep on a regular basis may have even more pronounced effects on pain, he says.

“A relatively short-lived increase in sleep time in healthy adults reduces pain sensitivity,” says Roger B. Fillingim, PhD. He is the director of the University of Florida Pain Research and Intervention Center of Excellence in Gainesville. “This is among the first studies I have seen to show that a modest sleep improvement reduces pain sensitivity.”

Sleep expert Michael Breus, PhD, says that sleep and pain are intimately connected. “When you are sleepy, you are cranky, moody, depressed, and anxious,” he says.  “Every injury or type of pain gets worse with less sleep.”

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers. Five Filters recommends: Gaza Blitz – Turmoil And Tragicomedy At The BBC.

Visit the Source Site

Firm Stops Making Generic Lipitor After Recall

Firm Stops Making Generic Lipitor After Recall

plaque buildup in artery

Nov. 30, 2012 — After recalling 41 lots of its generic Lipitoratorvastatin — the FDA says Ranbaxy Inc. will stop making the drug “until it has thoroughly investigated” how glass particles got into the medication.

Although Ranbaxy supplied more than 40% of the generic cholesterol-lowering drug sold in the U.S., the FDA says it does not expect a shortage. Five other firms make generic Lipitor: Sandoz, Teva, Apotex, Mylan, and Dr. Reddy’s.

The FDA says the tiny glass particles contaminating Ranbaxy’s atorvastatin have only “a remote possibility” of causing harm. Ranbaxy says the particles, about the size of a grain of sand, might cause “physical irritation.”

Ranbaxy makes atorvastatin, and puts it into pill form at its U.S. facilities. The active ingredient, however, comes from India. Ranbaxy’s preliminary investigation suggests that this active ingredient was contaminated with the glass particles, according to FDA public information officer Sarah Clark-Lynn.

To date, there have been no reports of harm linked to Ranbaxy generic Lipitor.

It’s not the first sign of trouble for Ranbaxy, the huge Indian pharmaceutical company owned by Japan’s Daiichi Sankyo. Last January, the company signed an FDA-requested consent decree closing plants in India and the U.S. until it made “fundamental changes.” None of those plants made the recently recalled generic Lipitor products.

The company admitted to several serious charges, including submitting false data to the FDA, failing to prevent contamination of sterile drugs, failing to prevent penicillin contamination of non-penicillin drugs, and inadequate testing of drugs to ensure they kept their potency until their expiration date.

The U.S. Justice Department said the action was “unprecedented in its scope.”

Recalled Generic Lipitor

The recalled atorvastatin comes as a white tablet packaged in plastic bottles. The 10-mg tablets bear the imprint “RX12,” the 20-mg tablets bear the imprint ”RX828,” and the 40-mg tablets bear the imprint “RX829.” No 80-mg tablets are included in the recall.

Here’s the list of the recalled atorvastatin products:

Product

Lot Number

Pack Size

NDC #

Expiry Date

ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 10mg x 90 2436144 90’s Bottle 63304-827-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 10mg x 90 2436582 90’s Bottle 63304-827-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 10mg x 90 2441567 90’s Bottle 63304-827-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 10mg x 90 2441568 90’s Bottle 63304-827-90 31-Aug-14
         
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2436731 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437381 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437940 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437942 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437945 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437947 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437952 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437953 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2437960 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2440676 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2440677 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2440680 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 20mg x 90 2440681 90’s Bottle 63304-828-90 31-Aug-14
         
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 500 2437956 500’s Bottle 63304-829-05 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 500 2437957 500’s Bottle 63304-829-05 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 500 2440675 500’s Bottle 63304-829-05 31-Aug-14
         
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434265 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434266 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434824 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434826 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434827 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434828 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434829 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434830 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2434831 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Jul-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2436580 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2436725 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2436727 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2436729 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437377 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437380 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437941 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437943 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437944 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437949 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437950 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14
ATORVASTATIN Calcium Tablets 40mg x 90 2437955 90’s Bottle 63304-829-90 31-Aug-14

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers. Five Filters recommends: Gaza Blitz – Turmoil And Tragicomedy At The BBC.

Visit the Source Site

Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Challenged By Complications After Joint Replacement Surgery

Main Category:
Article Date: 30 Nov 2012 – 0:00 PST

Ads by Google

– Info for MDs Treating Patients Who Are Not Candidates for Surgery –
– Proteins, Antibodies, ELISA kits, Bulks & Vials, Quality Guaranteed –
– Learn About Ph+ Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. Visit CML Alliance –

Current ratings for:
Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Challenged By Complications After Joint Replacement Surgery

Patient / Public: not yet rated
Healthcare Prof: not yet rated

In the first systemic review of evidence assessing complications following total joint arthroplasty, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were found to have an increased risk for hip dislocation after hip replacement surgery compared to those with osteoarthritis (OA). Study findings published online in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), also indicate that RA patients have a higher infection risk following total knee replacement than patients with OA.
The ACR reports that OA – the most common form of arthritis – affects 27 million Americans 25 years of age and older, and another 1.3 million adults are living with RA. Previous studies show that one of the most effective treatment options for end-stage arthritis of the hip or knee is total joint replacement. Experts suggest that success with this intervention is evident given the increasing rates of joint replacements. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 676,000 total knee replacements and 327,000 total hip replacements were performed in the U.S. in 2009.
“Joint arthroplasty is successful in relieving the pain and disability caused by hip or knee arthritis,” said lead author Dr. Bheeshma Ravi from the University of Toronto and Women’s College Research Institute (WCRI) in Canada. “While complication rates are low there are some cases with serious consequences that include infection, joint dislocation, blood clots and even death.”
To explore this important issue, Dr. Ravi and colleagues conducted a systemic review of the literature to assess complication risk in OA and RA patients following joint replacement surgery. Evidence from January 1990 to December 2011 was evaluated and 40 studies were included in the analysis. The study population included patients aged 18 years or older who had hip or knee replacements and excluded patients who had replacement surgery due to a fracture or cancer. Studies that involved 200 joints or more were incorporated in the current analysis.
Analysis shows RA patients had a higher risk of dislocation following hip replacement surgery than patients with OA. RA patients who had total knee replacements were also at higher risk of infection compared to those with OA. The team found no difference in revision rate, 90-day mortality or blood clot risk between the two patient groups. Dr. Ravi concludes, “Additional studies to confirm our findings are necessary and further investigation of possible reasons for differences in joint replacement complication rates between RA and OA patients is needed.”


Full citation: “A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Comparing Complications following Total Joint Arthroplasty for Rheumatoid Arthritis versus Osteoarthritis.” Bheeshma Ravi, Benjamin Escott, Prakesh S Shah, Richard Jenkinson, Jas Chahal, Earl Bogoch, Hans Kreder, Gillian Hawker. Arthritis & Rheumatism; Published Online: November 28, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/art.37690).

Wiley

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

n.p. “Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Challenged By Complications After Joint Replacement Surgery.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 30 Nov. 2012. Web.
30 Nov. 2012. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/253320.php>
n.p. (2012, November 30). “Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Challenged By Complications After Joint Replacement Surgery.” . Retrieved fromhttp://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/253320.php.

Ads by Google

– Learn More About Treating Patients with Votubia® (everolimus) –
– Proteins, Antibodies, ELISA kits, Bulks & Vials, Quality Guaranteed –
– Learn About Ph+ Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. Visit CML Alliance –

‘Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Challenged By Complications After Joint Replacement Surgery’

This is to help prevent SPAM submissions. Please enter the words exactly as they appear, including capital letters and punctuation.*
reCAPTCHA-Bild

: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our .

Rheumatoid arthritis, sometimes referred to as rheumatoid disease, is a chronic (long lasting), progressive and disabling autoimmune disease that causes inflammation (swelling) and pain in the joints, the tissue around the joints, and other organs in…

Follow Our Arthritis News On Twitter

Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Simply visit our and select the ‘follow’ option.

Visit the Source Site