Optimal Quality Care Of Geriatric Surgical Patients: Landmark Guidelines Just Released

Main Category: Seniors / Aging
Also Included In: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 30 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Optimal Quality Care Of Geriatric Surgical Patients: Landmark Guidelines Just Released

New comprehensive guidelines for the pre- operative care of the nation’s elderly patients have been issued by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). The joint guidelines – published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons – apply to every patient who is 65 years and older as defined by Medicare regulations. The guidelines are the culmination of two years of research and analysis by a multidisciplinary expert panel representing the ACS and AGS, as well as by expert representatives from a range of medical specialties.

Male Breast Enlargement (Gynecomastia)

Experts explain the causes of and treatments for gynecomastia, or male breast enlargement.

By David Freeman
WebMD Feature

Elliot W. Jacobs, MD, knows a thing or two about enlarged breasts in men, and not just because he specializes in treating the condition. 

“My own breasts became enlarged when I was a teenager,” says the New York plastic surgeon. “It was very embarrassing. Once, I went to my locker after gym class and saw that a classmate had hung a bra on it.”

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Klinefelter Syndrome

Are We Too Clean? Letting Kids Get Dirty and Germy

It’s the basic nature of young children to touch the very things in their environment that their parents find most disgusting. Just try to keep your 1-year-old from sticking the dog’s bone in her mouth!

Epidemic-scale flu seasons have health authorities imploring regular hand washing, and with talk of sanitizer gel like it was liquid gold, it’s tough not to worry about what your children are getting into and the ultimate impact it will have on their health.

Infectious diseases are a legitimate cause for concern, but some would argue that our society has gone overboard when it comes to protecting our kids from germs.

Humira Approved for Ulcerative Colitis Treatment

Sept. 28, 2012 — The FDA has approved Abbott’s Humira for the treatment of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis.

Humira (adalimumab) now is approved for both forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.

It was already approved to treat Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, plaque psoriasis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

For ulcerative colitis, Humira is approved when other drugs to suppress immune responses haven’t worked.

“Each patient with ulcerative colitis experiences the disease differently, and treatment must be adjusted to meet each individual’s needs,” says Donna Griebel, MD, director of the FDA’s gastroenterology division. “Today’s approval provides an important new treatment option for patients who have had an inadequate response to conventional therapy.”

Genetic Researchers Find New, Low-Cost Approach For Ovarian And Breast Cancer Testing

Main Category: Ovarian Cancer
Also Included In: Breast Cancer;  Medical Devices / Diagnostics;  Genetics
Article Date: 29 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Genetic Researchers Find New, Low-Cost Approach For Ovarian And Breast Cancer Testing

In a new genetic study, researchers said they may have found a way to cut the cost of genetic screening for breast and ovarian cancers from $3000 to $400.

Three teams of infertility scientists in New York and Austria collaborated to study gene mutations that increase a woman’s likelihood of breast and ovarian cancers. In the process, they made a discovery that could reduce to the cost of breast and ovarian cancer screening, making diagnosis more widely available to women in need.

Following Radiation In Prostate Cancer, Risk Markers Discovered For Erectile Dysfunction

Main Category: Prostate / Prostate Cancer
Also Included In: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation;  Radiology / Nuclear Medicine
Article Date: 29 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT

Knowledge Of The Biochemical Events Needed To Maintain Erection May Lead To New Therapies For Erectile Dysfunction

Main Category: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation
Article Date: 28 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT

Knowledge Of The Biochemical Events Needed To Maintain Erection May Lead To New Therapies For Erectile Dysfunction

For two decades, scientists have known the biochemical factors that trigger penile erection, but not what’s needed to maintain one. Now an article by Johns Hopkins researchers, scheduled to be published this week by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), uncovers the biochemical chain of events involved in that process. The information, they say, may lead to new therapies to help men who have erectile dysfunction.

Eating Cherries Reduces Gout Attacks

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Also Included In: Nutrition / Diet
Article Date: 28 Sep 2012 – 12:00 PDT

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Eating Cherries Reduces Gout Attacks

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Smoking on the Rise in Youth Movies

Sept. 28, 2012 — Onscreen tobacco use increased by 34% per movie last year in films targeted at children and teens, according to a new study.

Researchers say the dramatic rise in smoking scenes in top-grossing U.S. movies with a G, PG, or PG-13 rating ends five years of steady decline in onscreen tobacco use.

“The growth in onscreen tobacco use in 2011 reversed years of progress toward tobacco-free youth-rated movies,” write researcher Stanton Glantz, PhD, of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues in Preventing Chronic Disease.

Insomnia, Anxiety Drugs May Raise Dementia Risk

Sept. 27, 2012 — Seniors who take certain kinds of drugs to treat anxiety or insomnia may be more likely to develop dementia than those who do not, a new study shows.

Seniors are often prescribed benzodiazepines or similar drugs to help with sleeping problems or anxiety. And even though most of these drugs are only meant to be used for a few weeks or months at a time, the drugs can be habit forming. Studies have found that many older adults stay on them longer, sometimes for years.