Mystery Surrounding The Death Of Two Sisters Nearly 50 Years Ago Solved By Researchers

Main Category: Bones / Orthopedics
Also Included In: Genetics;  Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 31 Aug 2012 – 1:00 PDT

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Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have identified the genetic cause of a rare and fatal bone disease by studying frozen skin cells that were taken from a child with the condition almost fifty years ago. Their study, which details how the MT1-MMP gene leads to the disease known as Winchester syndrome, appears in the online edition of The American Journal of Human Genetics.

Potential New Type Of Diagnostic Imaging Technology Using Collagen-Seeking Synthetic Protein Could Lead Doctors To Tumor Locations

Main Category: Medical Devices / Diagnostics
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Cancer / Oncology
Article Date: 31 Aug 2012 – 2:00 PDT

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Johns Hopkins researchers have created a synthetic protein that, when activated by ultraviolet light, can guide doctors to places within the body where cancer, arthritis and other serious medical disorders can be detected.

Erectile Dysfunction Linked to Increased Cardiovascular Risk

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Main Category: Cardiovascular / Cardiology
Also Included In: Erectile Dysfunction / Premature Ejaculation;  Heart Disease
Article Date: 30 Aug 2012 – 16:00 PDT

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According to a recent report by the Princeton Consensus (Expert Panel) Conference, men’s sexual function should be evaluated and taken into account when they are being tested for risk factors of cardiovascular problems.

Collaborative Care Facilitates Therapy Compliance For Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis Improves Function, Pain, And Quality Of Life

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Pharmacy / Pharmacist;  Rehabilitation / Physical Therapy
Article Date: 30 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Canadian researchers have determined that community-based pharmacists could provide an added resource in identifying knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study, published in Arthritis Care Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), represents the first evidence supporting a collaborative approach to managing knee OA. Findings suggest that involving pharmacists, physiotherapists, and primary care physicians in caring for OA patients improves the quality of care, along with patient function, pain, and quality of life.

Quality Measure For Stroke Care: Study Questions Validity

Main Category: Stroke
Also Included In: Public Health;  Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 29 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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One of the key indicators of the quality of care provided by hospitals to acute stroke victims is the percentage of patients who die within a 30-day period. A new study shows that the decisions made by patients and their families to stop care may account for as many as 40 percent of these stroke-related deaths, calling into question whether it is a valid measure of a hospital’s skill in providing stroke care.

Osteoarthritis Pain Targeted

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Pain / Anesthetics;  Seniors / Aging
Article Date: 23 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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The research relates to a family of molecules firstly discovered in Melbourne that applied to blood cell development. One of these, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or GM-CSF, acts as a messenger between cells acting at a site of inflammation.

Oral Drug Shows Clinical Response And Remission In Some Patients With Ulcerative Colitis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Crohn’s / IBD
Article Date: 16 Aug 2012 – 2:00 PDT

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An investigational drug currently under FDA review for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has now shown positive results in patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego, School of Medicine. The study will appear in the August 16, 2012 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

Post-Injury Arthritis May Be Prevented By Stem Cell Therapy

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Stem Cell Research
Article Date: 14 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Duke researchers may have found a promising stem cell therapy for preventing osteoarthritis after a joint injury.

Injuring a joint greatly raises the odds of getting a form of osteoarthritis called post-traumatic arthritis, or PTA. There are no therapies yet that modify or slow the progression of arthritis after injury.

Hand Implants Not Fit For Purpose

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Medical Devices / Diagnostics;  Bones / Orthopedics
Article Date: 13 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Poorly-performing medical implants have hit the headlines recently, and the trend looks set to continue: the September issue of the Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) homes in on the unacceptable performance of hand implants for osteoarthritis patients. Citing several recent studies, the editorial asks why these implants – which perform worse that certain hip replacement implants now deemed unacceptable – are still widely used. JHS is an online and print, orthopedic surgery journal published by SAGE.

Medicare Woes Mostly Rooted In Myth: Retirement Expert

Main Category: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Also Included In: Seniors / Aging
Article Date: 12 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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Various misconceptions surrounding the continued viability of Medicare can be debunked or discredited, making it more important than ever for voters and policymakers to fully understand the program’s existing contours and limitations, according to a paper published by a University of Illinois expert on retirement benefits.