The Cause Identified Of LGL Leukemia

Main Category: Lymphoma / Leukemia / Myeloma
Also Included In: Immune System / Vaccines;  Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 18 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

<!– rate icon rate article

Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

LGL leukemia is a relatively rare, malignant blood disease of the mature T-cells and, in many cases, it is related to autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. The pathogenetic mechanism of the disease has been unknown and it has previously been unclear if the disease is an overreaction of the normal defense system or a malignant hematological disease.

One of the key symptoms of LGL disease is a low count of white blood cells (neutrophils), which may predispose the patients to life-threatening infections.

It was discovered that patients suffering from LGL leukemia have a mutation in the STAT3 gene in a very restricted SH2 area, which has a key effect on the function of the gene. This is not an inherited gene mutation but a so-called acquired mutation. The cause for the mutation is not known, but probably chronic viral infection or some other long-term antigen exposure can be predisposing factors. The STAT3 gene plays a key role in many cell signaling pathways.

After the finding, the prevalence of the mutation in LGL patients was verified using a larger patient group (77 patients) in cooperation with research groups at the Ohio (Prof. Maciejewski) and Pennsylvania (Prof. Loughran) Universities. It was discovered that 40% of all LGL patients present with the STAT3 mutation.

In the future, this result can be utilized in diagnosing the disease and possibly also in treatment, since the first STAT3 inhibitors are already undergoing early clinical trials. In addition, the research discovered that those LGL patients who had a mutation in the STAT3 gene were also more likely to suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. Hence, the research group intends to clarify next if patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis can be found with similar gene mutations. If such mutations were to be found this would introduce new opportunities to the pathogenetic mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘The Cause Identified Of LGL Leukemia’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Everyday Health Network

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Under-Use Of Safer Kidney Cancer Surgery For Poorer, Sicker Medicare, Medicaid Patients

Main Category: Cancer / Oncology
Also Included In: Urology / Nephrology;  Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 17 May 2012 – 1:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

<!– rate icon rate article

Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

An increasingly common and safer type of surgery for kidney cancer is not as likely to be used for older, sicker and poorer patients who are uninsured or rely on Medicare or Medicaid for their health care, according to a new study by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital.

The treatment, partial nephrectomy (PN), involves surgically removing only the diseased portion of a cancerous kidney, leaving the unaffected part to continue to function.

Standard treatment for small kidney tumors has traditionally been radical nephrectomy (RN) – surgical removal of the entire kidney, part of the ureter, the adrenal gland, and some surrounding tissue.

The less-extreme PN became possible with improvements in 3D scanning technology, and not only offers obvious advantages over RN, but earlier studies have found that it results in an overall drop in related cardiovascular complications and death.

The results will be presented this week at the American Urological Association Annual Meeting in Atlanta.

The Henry Ford study looked at 375,986 kidney cancer patients from throughout the U.S. who underwent either PN or RN from 1998 to 2009. Of those, 63,670 were PN patients.

During the study period, researchers found that the rate PR grew nearly five times, from 6 percent of patients to 28 percent, says Quoc-Dien Trinh, M.D., a Fellow at Henry Ford Hospital’s Vattikuti Urology Institute and lead author of the study.

Most kidney cancer patients today can be treated with this kidney-saving technique, which reduces the chance of long-term kidney failure. Another advantage is that if something happens to the patient’s other kidney, there is still one in reserve.

But the Henry Ford study also found that while PN is becoming more common, it is not being used to treat certain patients for other than medical reasons. The researchers learned that rates of PN dropped in patients who:

  • Are older and have additional diseases or disorders
  • Have no insurance or rely and Medicare and/or Medicaid for their health care
  • Live in lower-income zip codes
  • Are treated in lower-volume, non-teaching hospitals

There are several possible reasons for these disparities, Dr. Trinh says, although they’re mostly conjecture because available data doesn’t provide the information to test them.

“We couldn’t adjust for such things as disease characteristics like tumor size, grade or location,” he explains. “Also, it’s possible that these patients have inferior access to care, so present with worse disease, when partial nephrectomy isn’t feasible.

“However, it is also entirely possible that patients within this bracket are treated at hospitals that don’t have the proficiency to perform this advanced surgical technique, therefore putting these patients at risk of the well-documented, long-term effects of radical nephrectomy.”

If the disparities exist because of limited access, “then mechanisms need to be implemented to ensure that these patients receive higher quality care, and that they receive the appropriate treatment, namely partial nephrectomy, whenever possible,” Dr. Trinh says. “This has been shown in all sorts of medical procedures and specialties.

“We have to change the way insurance is distributed and how health care is delivered. But this is easier said than done.”

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘Under-Use Of Safer Kidney Cancer Surgery For Poorer, Sicker Medicare, Medicaid Patients’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Everyday Health Network

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Predicting Arthritis At Much Earlier Stage With New Biomarker Test

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Preventive Medicine
Article Date: 17 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

<!– rate icon rate article



Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

More than 27 million adults currently suffer from osteoarthritis, which is the most common form of arthritis. In the past, doctors have been unable to diagnose patients with arthritis until they begin to show symptoms, which include joint pain and stiffness. By the time these symptoms are present, it is often too late for preventive and minimally invasive treatment options to be effective. Now, a research team from the University of Missouri’s Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory has found a way to detect and predict arthritis before patients begin suffering from symptoms.

James Cook, a researcher from the MU College of Veterinary Medicine and the William C. and Kathryn E. Allen Distinguished Professor in Orthopaedic Surgery, along with MU researchers Bridget Garner, Aaron Stoker, Keiichi Kuroki, Cristi Cook, and Prakash Jayabalan, have developed a test using specific biomarkers that can accurately determine if a patient is developing arthritis as well as predict the potential severity of the disease. The test can be run off of a single drop of fluid from a patient’s joint, which is obtained with a small needle similar to drawing blood.

“With this biomarker test, we can study the levels of specific proteins that we now know are associated with osteoarthritis,” Cook said. “Not only does the test have the potential to help predict future arthritis, but it also tells us about the early mechanisms of arthritis, which will lead to better treatments in the future.”

In their study published in the Journal of Knee Surgery, the MU researchers report that they developed the test by analyzing the joints of dogs that suffer from arthritis. Veterinarians predict that 20 percent of middle-aged dogs and 90 percent of older dogs have osteoarthritis in one or more joints. Since canine joints operate similarly to the joints of humans, Cook says the test is being adapted to human patients.

“This test has already shown early usefulness for allowing us to monitor how different treatments affect the arthritic joints in people,” Cook said. “With further validation, this test will allow doctors to adjust and fine tune treatments to individual patients. Also, being able to tell patients when they are at a high risk for developing arthritis will give doctors a strong motivational tool to convince patients to take preventive measures including appropriate exercise and diet change.”

The biomarker test is currently available for licensing and is in the process of gaining FDA approval.

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘Predicting Arthritis At Much Earlier Stage With New Biomarker Test’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Everyday Health Network

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Potential To Treat Arthritis Using Delivery System For Gene Therapy

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Genetics;  Immune System / Vaccines
Article Date: 16 May 2012 – 1:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

<!– rate icon rate article



Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

A DNA-covered submicroscopic bead used to deliver genes or drugs directly into cells to treat disease appears to have therapeutic value just by showing up, researchers report.

Within a few hours of injecting empty-handed DNA nanoparticles, Georgia Health Sciences University researchers were surprised to see increased expression of an enzyme that calms the immune response.

In an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis, the enhanced expression of indoleomine 2,3 dioxygenase, or IDO, significantly reduced the hallmark limb joint swelling and inflammation of this debilitating autoimmune disease, researchers report in the study featured on the cover of The Journal of Immunology.

“It’s like pouring water on a fire,” said Dr. Andrew L. Mellor, Director of the GHSU’s Medical College of Georgia Immunotherapy Center and the study’s corresponding author. “The fire is burning down the house, which in this case is the tissue normally required for your joints to work smoothly,” Mellor said of the immune system’s inexplicable attack on bone-cushioning cartilage. “When IDO levels are high, there is more water to control the fire.”

Several delivery systems are used for gene therapy, which is used to treat conditions including cancer, HIV infection and Parkinson’s disease. The new findings suggest the DNA nanoparticle technique has value as well for autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, type 1 diabetes and lupus. “We want to induce IDO because it protects healthy tissue from destruction by the immune system,” Mellor said.

The researchers were exploring IDO’s autoimmune treatment potential by inserting the human IDO gene into DNA nanoparticles. They hoped to enhance IDO expression in their arthritis model when Dr. Lei Huang, Assistant Research Scientist and the paper’s first author, serendipitously found that the DNA nanoparticle itself produced the desired result. Exactly how and why is still being pursued. Early evidence suggests that immune cells called phagocytes, white blood cells that gobble up undesirables like bacteria and dying cells, start making more IDO in response to the DNA nanoparticle’s arrival. “Phagocytes eat it and respond quickly to it and the effect we measure is IDO,” Mellor said.

Dr. Tracy L. McGaha, GHSU immunologist and a co-author on the current study, recently discovered that similar cells also prevented development of systemic lupus erythematosus in mice.

Follow-up studies include documenting all cells that respond by producing more IDO. GHSU researchers already are working with biopolymer experts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of California, Berkeley and the Georgia Institute of Technology to identify the optimal polymer.

The polymer used in the study is not biodegradable so the researchers need one that will eventually safely degrade in the body. Ideally, they’d also like it to target specific cells, such as those near inflamed joints, to minimize any potential ill effects.

“It’s like a bead and you wrap the DNA around it,” Mellor said of the polymer. While the DNA does not have to carry anything to get the desired response in this case, DNA itself is essential to make cells express IDO. To ensure that IDO expression was responsible for the improvements, they also performed experiments in mice given an IDO inhibitor in their drinking water and in mice genetically altered to not express IDO. “Without access to the IDO pathway, the therapy no longer works,” Mellor said.

Drs. Andrew Mellor and David Munn reported in 1998 in the journal Science that the fetus expresses IDO to help avoid rejection by the mother’s immune system. Subsequent studies have shown tumors also use IDO for protection and clinical trials are studying the tumor-fighting potential of an IDO inhibitor. On the flip side, there is evidence that increasing IDO expression can protect transplanted organs and counter autoimmune disease.

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘Potential To Treat Arthritis Using Delivery System For Gene Therapy’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Everyday Health Network

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Murphy’s Law: preparing for EVERYTHING

We had the STUFF, but we need to do even more prep work this time

So our last trip to Disney was eventful, to say the least. Natalie’s portable suction machine died out on us, resulting in a middle of the night trip to Wal-Mart that just about resulted in a traffic ticket, followed by an early morning, emergency call to the front desk for a medical supply company that would rent equipment. All of this could have been prevented if:

  1. I had brought our home suction machine as back-up, for the hotel at least;
  2. I had researched locations of necessary stores (Wal-Mart, gas stations, pharmacies, etc.)
  3. I had researched medical supply companies that rent equipment

Thankfully, we were able to find a company to rent us a suction machine. What a life saver! But this time around, I plan on researching addresses and phone numbers of all relevant things I may need. I can say that the front desk of the Caribbean Beach Resort was great, and has probably seen it all and knew exactly where to direct us. BUT…I prefer to be prepared this time. So here’s what I found:

www.orlandomedicalrental.com

Kissimmee , FL , 34741

407-957-8595

This site also shows that they rent strollers, even strollers that seat up to three kids. Every single piece of equipment we could possibly need for Natalie is available here–Cough Assist, nebulizer, suction, biPap. They also have scooters, oxygen, bath equipment, and more for rent. It’s not like we’re too lazy to bring the stuff–we bought a utility trailer just to tote Nat’s gear. But things have a strange habit of dying on us at the most inopportune times, so this place looks like a one-stop shop.

www.caremedicalequipment.com

102 Drennen Rd. B-1
Orlando, Florida 32806

Phone (407) 856-2273

This, I think, is the company we went with last time. They offer a few less services, with the only ones being needed by us being suction machines and nebulizers, but I suppose if those are what we need and there are none available with the other company, here’s a back-up option!

OTHER NECESSITIES:

Walgreens
7767 W Irlo Bronson Blvd

Kissimmee, FL 34747
407-390-1701

Just in case there would be something we would need, medicine wise, that we couldn’t find at Wal-Mart, I included the nearest Walgreens, just to be safe.

Wal-Mart

3250 Vineland Road

Health Central

10000 W. Colonial Drive, Ocoee, FL  34761

407-296-1000

www.healthcentral.org

Osceola Regional Medical Center

700 West Oak Street, Kissimmee, FL 34741

407-846-2266

www.osceolaregional.com

Southlake Hospital

1099 Citrus Tower Blvd, Clermont, FL 34711

352-394-4071

www.southlakehospital.com

Winnie Palmer Hospital

83 West Miller Street, Orlando FL 32806

321-843-9792 www.orlandohealth.com/WinniePalmerHospital/index.aspx

So on the whole, this has been a pretty depressing article, I suppose. I’ve researched and looked up and perused everything about the fun of Disney, but I am a parent, so I need to be prepared for all possible outcomes. Because as they  attribute to Murphy’s Law: if it can go wrong, it will go wrong, and at least now I (and any readers I have) have the resources I may need without have a 2 a.m. panic.

Link Between Hospital Readmission Rates And Availability Of Care, Socioeconomics

Main Category: Heart Disease
Also Included In: Public Health;  Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 15 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

<!– rate icon rate article



Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

Differences in regional hospital readmission rates for heart failure are more closely tied to the availability of care and socioeconomics than to hospital performance or patients’ degree of illness, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2012.

U.S. regional readmission rates for heart failure vary widely – from 10 percent to 32 percent – researchers found. Communities with higher rates were likely to have more physicians and hospital beds and their populations were likely to be poor, black and relatively sicker. People 65 and older are also readmitted more frequently.

To cut costs, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services plans to penalize hospitals with higher readmission rates related to heart failure, heart attack and pneumonia. Next year, hospitals with higher-than-average 30-day readmission rates will face reductions in Medicare payments.

But the penalties don’t address the supply and societal influences that can increase readmission rates, said Karen E. Joynt, M.D., lead author of the study and an instructor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Mass.

“We have to find ways to help hospitals and communities address this problem together, as opposed to putting the burden on hospitals alone,” said Joynt. “We need to think less about comparing hospitals to each other in terms of their performance and more about looking at improvement in hospitals and communities.”

Researchers found:

  • Supply-side factors ― including availability of doctors and hospitals beds ― were the strongest predictors of differences in readmission rates, accounting for 17 percent.
  • Poverty and minority racial makeup was linked to 9 percent of the variation in readmission rates.
  • Hospital-performance quality accounted for 5 percent and patients’ degree of illness 4 percent.

“To really address the readmissions issue, we need to think about this in terms of community and population health,” Joynt said. “Focusing on community-level factors – such as the supply and mix of physicians and targeting efforts towards poor and minority communities – may be more fruitful approaches to reducing readmissions We need to think outside the walls of the hospital.”

Researchers analyzed national billing records of more than 3,000 hospitals in 2008-09 for more than 1 million elderly Medicare patients with heart failure. Of the patients in the review, 55 percent were female, 11 percent were black and they had an average age of 81.

The observational analysis didn’t include all potential influences, such as other illnesses, Joynt said.

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘Link Between Hospital Readmission Rates And Availability Of Care, Socioeconomics’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Everyday Health Network

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Compounds To Block Immune-Regulating Enzyme

Main Category: Immune System / Vaccines
Also Included In: Respiratory / Asthma;  Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 15 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

<!– rate icon rate article

Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found the first chemical compounds that act to block an enzyme that has been linked to inflammatory conditions such as asthma and arthritis, as well as some inflammation-promoted cancers.

The new study, published recently by the journal ACS Chemical Biology, describes new compounds that inhibit an important enzyme called PRMT1 (protein arginine methyltransferase 1). The new inhibitors will be useful to scientists who study PRMT1-related biological pathways in cells and who are developing drug treatments for PRMT1-related inflammatory conditions and cancers.

Standard screening techniques had been unable to distinguish between compounds that inhibit PRMT1 and those that inhibit other common PRMT family enzymes. In the new study, scientists from several Scripps Research laboratories collaborated to devise the first PRMT1-specific screening technique. “We were able to target a screening probe to a specific amino acid found on PRMT1, but not on most other PRMT enzymes,” said the study’s principal investigator Scripps Research Assistant Professor Kerri A. Mowen.

Mowen has been studying PRMT1 since her graduate school days, and, like others in the field, has been acutely aware of the need for selective PRMT1 inhibitors. The enzyme modifies the functionality of proteins by attaching a methyl group to their arginine amino acids; as such, it is involved in some of the most basic processes in cells. For example, Mowen and her colleagues showed in 2004 that PRMT1 helps drive the production of the key immune-stimulating proteins interferon-gamma and interleukin-4.

But although PRMT1 was known to be responsible for nearly all the arginine methylation that goes in mammalian cells, no one had been able to develop selective PRMT1 inhibitors, since the 10 other PRMT enzymes are nearly identical, structurally and biochemically. Even the removal of PRMT1’s gene from lab mice as an alternative way to study its functions was problematic, since mouse embryos can’t survive without the protein.


Inspiration Close By

The inspiration for the new PRMT1-selective screening technique came from research performed in the neighboring laboratory of co-author Benjamin F. Cravatt III, who chairs the Scripps Research Department of Chemical Physiology. As reported in 2010 in the journal Nature, Cravatt and his team screened tens of thousands of human and mouse proteins for the presence of hyper-reactive cysteine amino acids, which almost certainly mark functional sites on those proteins. PRMT1 was found to be one of the reactive-cysteine-containing proteins – and all but one other, comparatively rare PRMT enzyme was known to lack that cysteine.

“We took that discovery a step further, and we were able to find a probe that specifically would recognize that cysteine in PRMT1,” said Mowen, who was one of Cravatt’s collaborators on the 2010 study.

She and her colleagues first verified that the reactive cysteine in PRMT1 is in the active site of the enzyme. They then found a fluorescent probe that would bind to that cysteine. If a test compound acted as an inhibitor by fastening to PRMT1’s active site, it should interfere with the probe’s binding, and the probe’s fluorescence-based signal therefore should be lower. By contrast, if a test compound failed to bind to PRMT1’s active site, the probe should bind normally and its signal should remain elevated.

“We were able to verify, using available non-specific inhibitors of PRMT enzymes, that they did indeed bind to PRMT1 and prevent the probe from binding, and that was the proof-of-concept that enabled us to go ahead with a screen,” said Myles B. C. Dillon, a graduate student in Mowen’s lab who was lead author of the study.


Exploring Libraries of Potential

Dillon and Mowen turned to collaborator Scripps Research Professor Hugh Rosen, curator of a library of 16,000 chemical compounds known as the Maybridge Hitfinder Collection. By applying these compounds, one by one, along with the probe molecule, to solutions of PRMT1, the team was able to determine the compounds’ abilities to bind PRMT1’s active site and thus act as inhibitors. Importantly, the setup was simple enough to be adapted, with Rosen’s help, as an automated, “high-throughput” technique, capable of screening thousands of compounds.

In this way, the scientists were able to sift through the compound library to find two candidate PRMT1-selective inhibitors. “They have good efficacy and specificity, and we might be able to modify them to make them even better,” said Dillon.

Mowen, Dillon, and their colleagues now have a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to use their screening technique with a 300,000-compound NIH library, also curated at Scripps Research. “Once we get the results from this larger screen, we’ll consider our best inhibitor compounds and decide which ones to start optimizing,” said Dillon.

To Mowen, the success of the project owes much to the collaborative spirit at Scripps Research. “Many labs here are developing cutting-edge technologies that empower other labs’ work, and certainly we were able to benefit from that,” she said. “It’s a very supportive, synergistic environment.”

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘Compounds To Block Immune-Regulating Enzyme’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Everyday Health Network

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Permata Karya Utama, PT

 

Company Info
We are engaged in the sale of ” hospital equipment ” and medical equipment.

Supplier Division
We are one supplier in Indonesia which provides hospital or medical equipment. We are always ready to assist you in providing all medical equipment from several leading medical brands. We also distribute a variety of ” medical equipment ” disposable at an affordable price.

Vision
Being the leading and largest medical companies in Indonesia.

Mission
1. Providing quality health products at competitive prices
2. Build and maintain public confidence in the products we offer
3. Providing excellent service by giving priority to the interests and needs of customers

Product :

Microscope Binacular CX-21

Features Description :

This clinical level lab microscope is designed with the doctor of veterinary medicine in mind. This Olympus CX 21 comes with Olympus PLAN objectives. The small footprint of the CX21 is ideal for those who have ” counter top space ” or ” storage space ” concerns. You would be hard pressed to find a microscope with such high quality optics at this price.

# 10x wide field eyepieces with 18mm field of view.

# 4x, 10x, 40x, and 100x oil PLAN achromat objectives.

# Quadruple revolving nosepiece.

# 1.25 Abbe condenser.

# 6 volt 20 watt halogen.

Contact Person :

Name:
Mr. Marketing Division [Sales]
E-mail: trading @permatakaryautama .com
Homepage:

http://permatakaryautama.com

Mobile Number:
+6221.23740044
Phone Number:
+6221.237-400-44
Fax Number:
+6221.740-2707
Address:
Jalan Tanjung C3 / 26 Pamulang Barat
Tangerang Selatan, Banten
Indonesia

Introduction Of Bipartisan Bill To Eliminate Medicare SGR Formula Applauded By ACP

Main Category: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Also Included In: Primary Care / General Practice;  Health Insurance / Medical Insurance
Article Date: 11 May 2012 – 1:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

<!– rate icon rate article

Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has applauded Rep. Allyson Schwartz (D-Pa.) and Rep. Joe Heck (R-Nev.) for their bipartisan introduction of the Medicare Physician Payment Innovation Act of 2012.

The bill is designed to eliminate the flawed Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula and the turmoil brought by its resulting scheduled cuts. The SGR cuts threaten to drive physicians out of the Medicare and TriCare programs, creating severe access problems for seniors, disabled persons, and military families. (TriCare updates are set by the Medicare SGR formula, so military families are at the same risk of losing access to doctors because of the scheduled cuts as persons enrolled in Medicare.) The legislation stabilizes payments for six years, provides higher updates for undervalued primary and coordinated care services, and creates a pathway to new physician payment models that would better align payment with value to patients.

“Over the past decade, the repeated threat of cuts to physician payments resulting from the SGR have brought chaos to the practice environment,” said David L. Bronson, MD, FACP, president of ACP. “It is difficult for physicians to keep their doors open, especially for our members in practices that care for underserved populations, particularly in the nation’s low income and rural communities, with the constant threat of Medicare payments being cut by a quarter or more.”

Every year since 2001, the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula, which is used to determine payments for physicians’ services under Medicare, has threatened to impose steep cuts in Medicare payments for care provided to America’s seniors. While Congress typically acts to avert payment reductions, the average Medicare payment rate this year is essentially the same as it was in 2001. By consistently postponing the cuts, Congress has dug a hole that has grown to hundreds of billions of dollars. Unless Congress acts to fix this flawed payment formula, doctors will face a projected cut of nearly 30 percent on January 1, 2013.

“We enthusiastically support this legislation,” continued Dr. Bronson. “It not only addresses the continued threat of the SGR formula, it also moves Medicare beyond a pure fee-for-service payment model toward new models that better align payment with value.”

The legislation will:

  • Repeal the SGR, fully paid for by using money that has been set aside for military operations that the administration says are not needed and will never be spent.
  • Protect access to care for seniors, disabled persons, and military families, by eliminating all scheduled SGR cuts, including the one scheduled for January 1.
  • Stabilize payments through 2018, with no cuts for the next six years and positive updates to all physicians during 2014-2017.
  • Provide a higher update for undervalued primary, preventive and coordinated care services, whether provided by primary care physicians or by other specialists.
  • Accelerate development, evaluation and transition to new payment and delivery models, like Patient-Centered Medical Homes, developed with input by the medical profession and with external validation.

“ACP believes that the bipartisan Medicare Physician Innovation Act will benefit seniors, disabled persons and military families,” concluded Dr. Bronson. “We strongly urge Congress to pass the bill before the next scheduled SGR cut on January 1, 2013.”

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘ Introduction Of Bipartisan Bill To Eliminate Medicare SGR Formula Applauded By ACP’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Everyday Health Network

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2012 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered EU trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.