Creo Customers: Starring Stryker Medical

Creo customer Stryker Medical has been making some high-profile appearances lately. The company’s “rugged cots” star in a recent edition of the Product Design Show. Vince and Allison explain how the gurneys are being re-engineered to accommodate the modern obesity epidemic.

 

Speaking of epidemics…

Image courtesy of Warner Brothers Pictures

The star-studded movie, Contagion, opened in many countries this past weekend. If you had a chance to see it, you might have noticed Stryker’s unmistakable yellow cots throughout the story. See, behind Kate Winslet? That cot was designed by a Creo customer!

The advantage of hospital Bed

Generally, hospital bed have a bad rap for being terribly uncomfortable to sleep on. This is why most people, if given the option, would choose to sleep in their medical bed. In some cases, however, having a hospital bed at home can be very useful for adult children who are taking care of their parents at home. Medical equipment, with the addition of those designed specifically for use at home, can give great benefits for care givers and patients.

The five most important benefits of a hospital bed:

  1. Having the ability to adjust head and feet: Especially for patients that have back problems, difficulty breathing, or problems with mobility, being able to change the elevation of head or feet can make the patient feel more comfortable. Having the capability to adjust the head gives the patient the ability to eat meals, read, and watch TV.
  2. Side railings: The addition of side rails to a bed primarily prevents the patient from accidentally rolling out of medical bed. In addition, rails also give the patient something to grab onto when getting in or out of bed. For those patients that struggle with getting in and out, having rails makes this task much easier.
  3. Electric medical hospital bed height: Having the ability to raise and lower the overall height of the bed gives the caregiver and patient flexibility that can aid in certain circumstances. For patients who have trouble sitting down from a standing position, being able to adjust the bed to the desired height is a great benefit. For care givers, raising the bed to a height that is comfortable to work can alleviate backaches.
  4. Mattress that can be washed: Mattresses for hospital bed are produced using a thick, washable vinyl that can be scrubbed, disinfected, and washed if accidents occur. Because accidents will inevitably occur every now and then, having this capability is another added benefit.
  5. Ease of moving: Because hospital bed are on wheels, it makes it much more easier to move the bed to different locations if needed. Regular beds require much more effort to be moved. Hospital beds give the ability to push the bed to different parts of a room to give room for wheelchairs, commodes, and a variety of medical equipment.

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Areas Of Highest Human Risk For Lyme Disease In Eastern United States Detailed On New Map

Main Category: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 03 Feb 2012 – 0:00 PST

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A new map pinpoints well-defined areas of the Eastern United States where humans have the highest risk of contracting Lyme disease, one of the most rapidly emerging infectious diseases in North America, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As part of the most extensive Lyme-related field study ever undertaken, researchers found high infection risk confined mainly to the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and Upper Midwest and low risk in the South. The results were published in the February issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Given frequent over- and under-diagnosis of Lyme disease, the new map could arm the public and health officials with critical information on actual local risk.

“There has been a lot of discussion of whether Lyme disease exists outside of the Northeast and the upper Midwest, but our sampling of tick populations at hundreds of sites suggests that any diagnosis of Lyme disease in most of the South should be put in serious doubt, unless it involves someone who has traveled to an area where the disease is common,” said Dr. Maria A. Diuk-Wasser, Assistant Professor at the Yale School of Public Health and the lead author of the study.

“We can’t completely rule out the existence of Lyme disease in the South,” she added, “but it appears highly unlikely.”

The Lyme disease risk map was developed by researchers at the Yale School of Public Health in collaboration with Michigan State University, University of Illinois and University of California, Irvine, through a cooperative agreement with the CDC, which is seeking a better understanding of where Lyme disease poses a public health menace. Lyme disease is a tick-borne ailment with symptoms that range from a rash, headaches and fever to arthritis and Bell’s palsy.


Mobilizing Tick Hunters

The scientists involved in the study assembled a large field staff of more than 80 tick hunters. From 2004 to 2007, they combed through 304 individual sites from Maine to Florida and across the Midwest, dragging a one-meter by one-meter square of corduroy cloth in hopes of snagging the black legged tick Ixodes scapularis that is the main carrier of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi. (The study did not examine risk in the West where Lyme disease is believed to be confined to areas along the Pacific Coast where a different tick species, known as Ixodes pacificus or the western blacklegged tick, carries Lyme.)

The goal of the field work was to provide doctors and public health officials with a better sense of where people are at risk of Lyme disease by using the presence of known Lyme-carrying ticks as the main indicator of danger.

Current geographical assessments of Lyme disease risk are heavily reliant on reports of human infections, which the study notes can be a poor predictor of risk. The researchers point out that using human cases to determine areas of risk can be misleading due to the high level of “underreporting and misdiagnosis” of Lyme disease. They also note that where someone is diagnosed with the disease is not necessarily where they contracted it.

In addition, the study found that infected I. scapularis ticks may colonize a region long before they actually infect a human with Lyme disease, which means risk can be significant even without a confirmed case.

“A better understanding of where Lyme disease is likely to be endemic is a significant factor in improving prevention, diagnosis and treatment,” Diuk-Wasser said. “People need to know where to take precautions to avoid tick bites. Also, doctors may be less likely to suspect and test for Lyme disease if they are unaware a patient was in a risky area and, conversely, they may act too aggressively and prescribe unneeded and potentially dangerous treatments if they incorrectly believe their patient was exposed to the pathogen.”

The study notes that “accurate and timely” diagnosis is crucial to initiating antibiotic treatments that can help patients avoid the more serious complications of Lyme disease. At the same time, the authors point out that incorrectly suspecting Lyme disease has its own consequences, including potentially life-threatening complications from the antibiotics typically used to treat infections. (While the laboratory test for Lyme disease can produce both false-positives and false-negatives, false-positives are far more likely in non-endemic areas.)


Establishing a Map for Lyme Disease Risk in the Eastern United States

The maps that emerged from the tick survey show a clear risk of Lyme disease in large parts of the Northeast (including eastern Pennsylvania) from Maine going as far south as Maryland and northern Virginia, which is in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. But while conditions could be favorable for the disease to spread into the Tidewater region of Virginia – the data collected for the study indicates the bulk of the South is free of Lyme disease-carrying ticks.

The researchers also identify a separate and distinct Lyme disease risk region in the upper Midwest. It includes most of Wisconsin, a large area in northern Minnesota, and a sliver of northern Illinois.

However, the scientists confirm that Lyme disease remains on the move as its preference for forests and deer is aided by a century-long re-planting of trees inland once cleared for agriculture, along with a resurgence of deer populations. Diuk-Wasser and her colleagues found evidence to support an “emerging risk” for Lyme disease along the Illinois/Indiana border, the New York/Vermont border, southwestern Michigan, and eastern North Dakota. Also, Diuk-Wasser said new, unpublished field work now underway indicates Lyme disease is probably moving into central Virginia.


Lyme Disease: the Southern Challenge

While the scientists involved in mapping the Lyme disease risk believe most of the South is relatively free of the disease, one challenge to delineating a southern risk frontier is the fact that there are I. scapularis ticks in the region. They were once thought to be a distinct species, Diuk-Wasser said, but scientists now consider them to be the same species, although there are biological differences.

Most notably, tick experts find the Southern I. scapularis exhibit a feeding behavior in the immature stages that is different than that of its northern cousins. The Southern ticks prefer, it appears, the blood of lizards and skinks to small mammals that are more likely to carry the bacteria and show no interest in feeding on humans, which scientists believe makes it unlikely they play an important role as Lyme disease carriers.

Diuk-Wasser noted that one reason some people in the South may believe Lyme disease is a risk in their region is that they may frequently encounter a species known as the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum) that is “very aggressive, very abundant” and whose bite can cause a rash that looks similar to the “bull’s eye” lesion caused by Lyme disease. However, this disease, known as Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness or STARI, does not feature the neurological and arthritis problems associated with Lyme disease.

Nonetheless, Diuk-Wasser stresses that scientists cannot rule out completely that Lyme disease exists outside of the areas identified in the mapping project. And she pointed out there are limitations to the tick sampling techniques she and her colleagues employed to create the risk map. For example, the field teams conducted their tick collecting in late May, June, July, and August, which is considered peak feeding time. But she said some areas might experience a population surge in early May or earlier. (The climate in April in parts of Tennessee is likely tick friendly, but Diuk-Wasser said other field studies conducted in Tennessee during the spring have not found any Lyme-infected ticks.)

“This is a useful tool that can help physicians, nurses and policymakers make realistic resource decisions,” said James W. Kazura, MD, President of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, which publishes the journal, and director of the Center for Global Health and Diseases at Case Western Reserve University. “The scientific research done to create this new risk map for Lyme disease is an example of what is needed in the U.S. today for a variety of diseases given its immense value in making clinical decisions and allocating scarce resources.”

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Hooey

posted by Pamela Dodd on 3 Feb 2012 at 4:17 am

There’s lots of Lyme in the US South. I live in Florida and know many people with Lyme in my state, most of whom did not bring it with them from the East. I also get many requests a day on my Lyme website from people all over the US who have Lyme or think they might have it. Lyme is far more prevalent, and increasing, than this new map shows.

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Lymie

posted by Cathy on 3 Feb 2012 at 4:29 am

I have to tell ya, I live in Florida, and I HAVE Lyme disease. Who did the research for the map. Should have asked all of Lymies that live in the south and we could probably have documented it better!

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PRE-QUALIFICATION OF SUPPLIERS (WORLD VISION)

WORLD VISION

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF SUPPLIERS

Detailed Prequalification documents can be obtained from 13”’ to 19th September 2011 (9.am to 4.OOpm) at World Vision Somalia Office located at School Lane, Westlands, upon payment of a non-refundable fee of Kshs.2000 per Tender Category or bankers cheque payable to World Vision Somalia Program.

Existing Suppliers who wish to be considered for World Vision Somalia list of Suppliers are also required to submit their application for pre-qualification

completed pre-qualification documents in plain sealed envelope clearly marked PRE-QUALIFICATION OF SUPPLIERS FY2012-2014, Code and Category and addressed as indicated, should be dropped at the Tender box at the reception of World Vision Somalia Office not later than 26”’ September 2011 at 4pm.

The Secretary to the tender committee World Vision- Somalia

P. 0 Box 56527-00200

Nairobi

Note: This is an application for prequalification and not for supply of goods and services. Only pre-qualified suppliers will be requested to provide competitive quotations for supply of goods and services as and when needed.

World Vision reserves the right to accept or reject any applications, and not bound to give reasons for its decision. Canvassing or giving false information will lead to automatic disqualification.

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Those Living In Poor Neighbourhoods Suffer Higher Incidence Of Arthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Public Health
Article Date: 02 Feb 2012 – 1:00 PST

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Results revealed that people who live in socially disadvantaged areas were 42 per cent more at risk of getting arthritis than people in more affluent areas.

The study revealed more than 30 per cent of people living in socially disadvantaged areas reported having arthritis, as opposed to 18.5 per cent in the more affluent areas.

Led by the University of Melbourne, Deakin University and Queensland University of Technology, the study was published in the international journal Arthritis Care Research.

Lead author, Dr Sharon Brennan from the University of Melbourne and Deakin University said of all the findings, it was location of residence that influenced arthritis prevalence the most and that it was a concerning and important finding.

“People with the condition suffer a lower quality of life. The symptoms of arthritis such as pain and immobility are debilitating,” she said.

“Our results indicate that intervention efforts to reduce arthritis may need to focus on both people and places.

“It is widely known that obesity, age and social disadvantage are linked and are also risk factors for arthritis.

“This is the first time a study has shown specific associations with people’s neighbourhoods which may explain that link.”

The study is the first to examine the relationship between individual and neighbourhood-level disadvantage on arthritis.

Using data from the HABITAT (How Areas in Brisbane Influence Health and Activity) cohort led by Professor Gavin Turrell of the Queensland University of Technology, researchers surveyed 10,757 males and females aged 40-65 years, selected from 200 neighborhoods of varying socio economic status in Brisbane.

Neighbourhoods, areas within suburbs, are based on Australian Bureau of Statistics Census data, which groups 200 private dwellings by proximity.

Dr Brennan said the study has important implications for policy, health promotion, and other intervention strategies designed to reduce the rates of arthritis.

“Our next steps will be to find out why there is a link to arthritis and place,” she said.

“One of the factors may be that if the environment is not conducive to physical activity, then people are less likely to be active,” she said.

In Australia, arthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders accounted for the largest proportion of direct health expenditure (31 per cent), amounting to $1.2 billion. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are the most common forms of arthritis.

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Medical equipment and assistive technology

| Author: | Filed under: About Adam, Disability, I want to help, General | Tags: , |Leave a comment »

According to Wikipedia, assistive technology is an umbrella term that includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices for people with disabilities and also includes the process used in selecting, locating, and using them. Having the right medical equipment can change someone’s life.

Someone who can’t walk can become mobile with a wheelchair. If you can’t feed yourself, there is adapted silverware and plateware that can help. A person with a disability who can’t reach up to comb their hair can use a long handle comb to become independent with combing their hair.

Medical equipment and assistive technology can help an individual’s self esteem soar by providing the tools a physically challenged person needs to become more independent plus having the right pressure relief equipment can improve overall health and prevent skin breakdown.

Adam is in need of medical equipment. He does not qualify for government assistance and is unable to work due to the severity of his disability. He is at risk for having pressure sores and other problems. The proper medical equipment and assistive technology will help improve his life.

Please visit his website to see how you can make a difference in Adam’s life.

God bless!

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National Study Shows Majority Of Self-Harming Adolescents Don’t Receive A Mental Health Assessment During Emergency Room Visit

Main Category: Mental Health
Also Included In: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP;  Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 01 Feb 2012 – 1:00 PST

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A national study of Medicaid data shows most young people who present to emergency departments with deliberate self-harm are discharged to the community, without receiving an emergency mental health assessment. Even more, a roughly comparable proportion of these patients receive no outpatient mental health care in the following month. These are the findings from a study conducted by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital that appears in the Journal of the American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry.

Deliberate self-harm is one of the most common reasons for an emergency department visit by young people in the United States. Eighty to 90 percent of young people who deliberately harm themselves meet criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder, most commonly mood disorders. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence has advised that all patients presenting to emergency departments with an episode of deliberate self-harm should receive a mental health evaluation before discharge.

“Emergency department personnel can play a unique role in suicide prevention by assessing the mental health of patients after deliberate self-harm and providing potentially life-saving referrals for outpatient mental health care,” said Jeff Bridge, PhD, principal investigator in the Center for Innovation in Pediatric Practice of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and lead study author. “However, the coordination between emergency services for patients who deliberately harm themselves and linkage with outpatient mental health treatment is often inadequate.”

In an effort to examine the quality of the emergency mental health management of young people who are discharged to the community after an act of deliberate self-harm, Dr. Bridge and colleagues examined Medicaid Extract files throughout the country for children ages 10 to 19.

They found that in this Medicaid population, most young people who presented to the emergency departments with deliberate self-harm were discharged to the community as opposed to inpatient care. Only 39 percent of all patients who are discharged to the community received a mental health assessment while in the emergency department.

Dr. Bridge says without more detailed information on whether the deliberate self-harm occurred with or without a suicidal intent it is impossible to exclude the possibility that some discharged patients are at relatively low risk, although deliberate self-harm is the main risk factor for completed suicide. The greatest risk of suicide occurs in the period immediately after an episode of deliberate self-harm.

“Our findings suggest that the decision to provide emergency mental health assessment is dictated less by the clinical characteristics of individual patients and more by staffing patterns or established emergency department evaluation protocols,” said Dr. Bridge. “This study highlights the need for strategies to promote emergency department mental health assessments, strengthening the training of physicians in pediatric mental health and adolescent suicide prevention and timely transitions to outpatient mental health care.”

Consistent with previous research of adult patients on Medicaid who present to emergency departments after self-harm, recent mental health treatment emerged as the most powerful predictor of follow-up outpatient mental health care. Nonetheless, only about one half of patients who had visited the emergency department for a mental-health-related reason up to 60 days before, received a mental health assessment during their self-harm incident visit. “This association and the lack of an association between emergency mental health assessment and follow up care suggest that a portion of the follow up mental health visits simply represent ongoing mental health care rather than new emergency-department-driven referrals,” said Dr. Bridge.

Co-authors of the study include Steven C. Marcus, PhD, from the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Pennsylvania; and Mark Olfson, MD, MPH, from the New York State Psychiatric Institute and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University.

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EKG Machine Sale

V Med Supply is having a great sale on EKG machines.

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Brand new unit with warranty for only $395!

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We have biomedical engineers to service your EKG machines. We offer free estimates on all EKG machine repairs. Just give us a call at 516-771-4600 for all inquiries

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