Knee Replacements Soar Among The Under-60s, Finland

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Academic Journal
Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Rehabilitation / Physical Therapy;  Bones / Orthopedics
Article Date: 17 Jan 2012 – 12:00 PST

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A new study published online on 17 January in the journal Arthritis Rheumatism reports that rates of knee
replacement surgery in Finland’s 30 to 59-year-olds soared between 1980 and 2006, with women being the more common
recipients throughout. Lead author Dr. Jarkko Leskinen, an orthopedic surgeon at Helsinki University Central Hospital, and
colleagues also report that the greatest increase was among those aged between 50 and 59.

Link Between Ultra Short Telomeres And Osteoarthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Bones / Orthopedics
Article Date: 17 Jan 2012 – 0:00 PST

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Telomeres, the very ends of chromosomes, become shorter as we age. When a cell divides it first duplicates its DNA and, because the DNA replication machinery fails to get all the way to the end, with each successive cell division a little bit more is missed. New research published in BioMed Central’s open access journal Arthritis Research Therapy shows that cells from osteoarthritic knees have abnormally shortened telomeres and that the percentage of cells with ultra short telomeres increases the closer to the damaged region within the joint.

32 Million Americans Have Autoantibodies That Target Their Own Tissues

Main Category: Immune System / Vaccines
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Diabetes;  Lupus
Article Date: 17 Jan 2012 – 0:00 PST

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More than 32 million people in the United States have autoantibodies, which are proteins made by the immune system that target the body’s tissues and define a condition known as autoimmunity, a study shows. The first nationally representative sample looking at the prevalence of the most common type of autoantibody, known as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), found that the frequency of ANA is highest among women, older individuals, and African-Americans. The study was conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Researchers in Gainesville at the University of Florida also participated.

Knee Replacement Surgery Incidence Soars In Those Over Age 50

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Women’s Health / Gynecology
Article Date: 17 Jan 2012 – 1:00 PST

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Researchers in Finland found that annual cumulative incidences of partial and total knee arthroplasty, commonly known as knee replacement surgery, rose rapidly over a 27-year period among 30 to 59 year-olds in that country, with the greatest increase occurring in patients aged 50 to 59 years. According to the study published in Arthritis Rheumatism, a peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), incidences were higher in women throughout the study period.

Do Herbal Meds Help Osteoarthritis? Probably Not

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Academic Journal
Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Bones / Orthopedics;  Pain / Anesthetics
Article Date: 16 Jan 2012 – 10:00 PST

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A comprehensive review of herbal medicine products in the latest issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB) shows that there is little conclusive evidence to justify the widespread use of herbal medicines to relieve the symptoms of the painful joint condition osteoarthritis.

Medicare Plans Recruit Healthy Seniors By Offering Gym Benefits

Main Category: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Also Included In: Seniors / Aging;  Sports Medicine / Fitness
Article Date: 13 Jan 2012 – 0:00 PST

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Because healthy enrollees cost them less, Medicare Advantage plans would profit from selecting seniors based on their health, but Medicare strictly forbids practices such as denying coverage based on existing conditions. Another way to build a more profitable membership is to design insurance benefits that attract the healthiest patients. In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Brown University researchers report that plans have managed to do just that by offering fitness club memberships as a covered benefit.

Dilated Eye Exams For Medicare Beneficiaries Cost Effective, USA

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Academic Journal
Main Category: Eye Health / Blindness
Also Included In: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 11 Jan 2012 – 8:00 PST

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A study published Online First in the Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, suggests that it “would be highly cost-effective” to replace visual acuity screenings for new Medicare enrollees with coverage of a dilated eye exam for healthy patients who enter the government insurance program for the elderly.

ED Eye Care In Florida

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Academic Journal
Main Category: Eye Health / Blindness
Also Included In: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 11 Jan 2012 – 8:00 PST

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A major part of Florida’s emergency department eye care is reimbursed through Medicaid or paid for directly by the patients. According to a study published in the Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, these findings may be beneficial in strategic planning as the debate over how best to implement the nation’s new health care reform law progresses.

Annual Bleeding Events And Frequency Of Infusions Reduced By Preventive Hemophilia A Treatment

Main Category: Blood / Hematology
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Pediatrics / Children’s Health;  Preventive Medicine
Article Date: 11 Jan 2012 – 1:00 PST

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A Rush University Medical Center led international research team has announced that a treatment to prevent bleeding episodes in children with hemophilia A also is effective for adolescents and adults.

Kaiser Permanente Study Finds Continuous Health Coverage Essential For Patients Managing Diabetes

Main Category: Health Insurance / Medical Insurance
Also Included In: Diabetes;  Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP
Article Date: 06 Jan 2012 – 0:00 PST

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When patients with diabetes experience interruptions in health – insurance coverage, they are less likely to receive the screening tests and vaccines they need to protect their health. A new study finds that this is true even when patients receive free or reduced-cost medical care at federally funded safety net clinics.