How To Make Whatsapp Run On Your Phone?

Free messaging is always in line with new technologies and tools which are promising to provide you the results that you always looked for. Chatting with your friends is the need of time and when you are using the android phone, the chances of getting connected is easier but what about your iOS based devices?

There is a solution for downloading whatsapp for ipad, ios, iphone devices and you can use WhatsApp messenger as well and for that reason you may use the tool on your iOS devices as well. If you have internet on phone, then you are certainly using this app for various reasons.

Few things about whatsapp for your ios

To communicate easily with your friends, there is a whatsapp version for your iPAD as well which keep your communication supple by getting you connected with the people you love to talk. Whatsapp web version is there which promotes healthy way of communication and the latest version ensures that no security threats are observed.

Web version of this app is easy to be managed and when it comes to talking with your friends, you can be an absolute winner as this app makes communication really easier and free from any technical glitches.

How to connect through Whatsapp?

For establishing the connection, certain procedure is to be followed which requires you to scan the QR code. Scanning the code always comes out to be a major step that you need to take while using this app. You just need to log into the tool and here you are, talking with your friends in a trouble free manner.

The option to find this tool is there in the settings of whatsapp and through the menu, it becomes easier to locate this as well. While connecting your phone with the internet, Whatsapp works smoothly and with the latest version available, this connection becomes easier to be established.

How Whatsapp gets installed in your iphone?

Officially there is no version of whatsapp which is available for your iphone but alternatives are always there so you can make this app run on your phone. Check out the procedure for the same which is as follows:

  • On the ipad, open the safari and reach up for the weblink – web.whatsapp.com
  • From this link, you will be directed to the home page of WhatsApp
  • On this URL just tap and swipe it down and you get to access the top drawer where the favorite menu appears, this happens when you type the web address
  • Tap on the load desktop site option
  • Interface for WhatsApp web is displayed on the page and with the QR code available, you can reach up for settings to the WhatsApp web and by scanning the QR code two devices can be paired together
  • All the recent messages are displayed which is plausible from the voice notes that you will receive soon after this app gets installed in your phone

Despite of some limitations, there are many advantages of using the app which you can find to be quite suitable for establishing the communication link with your friends.

Chondroitin Sulfate Improves Hand Function, Relieves Morning Stiffness Caused By Osteoarthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 07 Sep 2011 – 0:00 PDT

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New research shows that chondroitin sulfate significantly decreased pain and improved hand function in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hand compared with those in the placebo group. Results of the clinical trial available in Arthritis Rheumatism, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), also report that chondroitin sulfate improves grip strength and relieves morning stiffness.

The ACR estimates that OA – the most common form of arthritis – affects more than 27 million adults in the U.S., causing joint pain and stiffness. Approximately 10% of the world population, 60 years and older, have symptomatic osteoarthritis according to the Global Burden of Disease 2000 report from the World Health Organization (WHO). Prior studies have found that 20% to 30% of adults have OA of the hand, with the prevalence rising to more than 50% after 60 years of age.

“Although hand OA is highly prevalent among adults and can significantly impact the quality of life for suffers, therapeutic options are still limited,” said Cem Gabay, M.D., with University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland and lead investigation of the Finger osteoArthritis Chondroitin Treatment Study (FACTS). “There are few trials examining therapeutic approaches specific to hand OA and much of the available evidence has been extrapolated from studies investigating other forms of OA.”

The single-center, placebo-controlled FACTS trial included 162 patients with radiographic hand OA who met inclusion criteria – spontaneous hand pain on the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 40 mm (scale 0-100) or more and Functional Index for Hand OA (FIHOA) level of 6 (scale 0-30). Participants received either 800 mg of chondroitin sulfate (80 patients) or placebo (82 patients) once daily for 6 months.

Results showed that patients in the chondroitin sulfate group had significant decrease in global hand pain compared with the placebo group, reflecting an 8.7 decrease on the VAS. Hand function also improved significantly for those taking chondroitin sulfate, decreasing more than 2 points on the FIHOA. Researchers also reported significantly improved hand function and reduction in morning stiffness for participants taking chondroitin sulfate versus placebo.

“Our findings show chondroitin sulfate is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hand OA,” concluded Dr. Gabay. “Alternative therapies, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), provide similar pain reducing effects, but with considerably more long-term toxicities.” Chondroitin sulfate is a naturally occurring molecule and a main component of joint cartilage. The chondroitin sulfate agent used in this study (Chondrosulf®) is licensed as a drug in Europe and not as a nutripharmaceutical; in the U.S. chondroitin sulfate is sold as a supplement and often paired with glucosamine.

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Chondroitin Sulphate Effective Treatment For Patients With Osteoarthritis

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Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 06 Sep 2011 – 9:00 PDT

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Chondroitin sulfate has been revealed in a new investigation to considerably reduce pain, improve hand function, enhance grip strength and relieve morning stiffness for individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hand, in comparison with patients in the placebo group. Results of the study are available in Arthritis Rheumatism, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

In the U.S., osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is estimated by the ACR to affect over 27 million adults. According to the Global Burden of Disease 2000 study from the World Health Organization (WHO), around 10% of the world population 60 years and over have OA. Previous investigations have discovered that OA of the hand affects 20% to 30% of adults. After 60 years of age, the incidence rose to over 50%.

Cem Gabay, M.D., with University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland and lead investigation of the Finger osteoArthritis Chondroitin Treatment Study (FACTS), explained:

“Although hand OA is highly prevalent among adults and can significantly impact the quality of life for suffers, therapeutic options are still limited.
There are few trials examining therapeutic approaches specific to hand OA and much of the available evidence has been extrapolated from studies investigating other forms of OA.”

162 patients with radiographic hand osteoarthritis were included in the single-center, placebo-controlled FACTS trial, all of whom met inclusion criteria, spontaneous hand pain on the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 40 mm (scale 0-100) or more and Functional Index for Hand OA (FIHOA) level of 6 (scale 0-30). The participants were divided into two groups, 80 patients received 800 mg of chondroitin sulfate, and 82 patients received a placebo once daily over a 6 month period.

Results revealed that in the chondroitin sulfate group, patients had a considerable reduction in global hand pain in comparison to the other group, displaying a decrease of 8.7 on the VAS. Chondroitin sulfate was also shown to substantially improve hand function, reflecting a decrease of over 2 points on the FIHOA, and reduce morning stiffness compared to the placebo group.

Dr. Gabay concluded:

“Our findings show chondroitin sulfate is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hand OA. Alternative therapies, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), provide similar pain reducing effects, but with considerably more long-term toxicities.”

A naturally occurring molecule and a main component of joint cartilage, the chondroitin sulfate agent used in this investigation (Chondrosulf®) is licensed as a drug in Europe and not as a nutripharmaceutical; Chondroitin sulfate is sold in the United States as a supplement and usually paired with glucosamine.

Written by Grace Rattue

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Grace Rattue (2011, September 6). Chondroitin Sulphate Effective Treatment For Patients With Osteoarthritis. Medical News Today. Retrieved September 6, 2011 from
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/233932.php


MLA
Grace Rattue. “Chondroitin Sulphate Effective Treatment For Patients With Osteoarthritis”. Medical News Today, September 6, 2011. Web. 6 Sep, 2011.


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VIVUS Announces FDA Acceptance Of Avanafil New Drug Application For Treatment Of Erectile Dysfunction

VIVUS, Inc. (NASDAQ: VVUS) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review the company’s new drug application (NDA) for its investigational drug candidate, avanafil, for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). The target date for the FDA to complete its review of the avanafil NDA is April 29, 2012…

Potential For Halting And Preventing Arthritis, MIT Study

Editor’s Choice
Academic Journal
Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Bones / Orthopedics
Article Date: 03 Sep 2011 – 20:00 PDT

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More than 10% of the 27 million Americans who suffer from arthritis, have the disease due to injury, that irritates and degrades the cartilage, causing a steady deterioration of joints, most often in the knee.

Research undertaken at MIT has identified a steroid drug commonly used to treat inflammatory diseases that could also prevent osteoarthritis from ever developing in those people, if given soon after the injury.

“In essence, it’s repurposing an existing drug,” says Alan Grodzinsky, senior author of the study, a professor of biological, mechanical and electrical engineering, and the director of MIT’s Center for Biomedical Engineering.

Sports like basketball or skiing have a higher risk of tearing ligaments, such as the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Military service and car accidents are also common sources of joint injuries. Thus these types of injuries are more common in younger people, who are more active and or risk takers. Once damaged, the cartilage tends to degrade causing problems later in life, if not immediately.

In most cases, the injury is treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen to reduce pain and swelling and if necessary weeks or months later, surgery maybe performed to fully stabilize the joint. However this type of more passive treatment is contradicted by the new MIT study.

The study published in the September 2 issue of the journal : Arthritis Research and Therapy is written by Grodzinsky and colleagues, including Yihong Lu, a recent MIT biological engineering PhD recipient, and Christopher Evans, the Maurice Edmond Mueller Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at Harvard Medical School.

The researchers used both human and bovine cartilage tissue which they damaged and then treated with inflammatory proteins called cytokines, which are typically released after a joint injury. Cytokines hasten cartilage breakdown.

The research showed that where damaged tissue is treated immediately with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone, cartilage breakdown was prevented. The drug also worked when given 24 – 48 hours after the injury, which is important because : “People who suffer joint injuries might not get to see a doctor right away,” Grodzinsky says.

It is somewhat ironic that Doctors have been using glucocorticoids drugs, usually on more elderly patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis, for decades now, but it has not been considered for immediate treatment of injuries.

Though admittedly the processes involved are not yet fully understood, the paper discusses how dexamethasone blocks the degradation of aggrecan, a protein-carbohydrate complex that is a major structural and biomechanically functional component of cartilage.

The research doesn’t yet know if dexamethasone could reverse cartilage damage that has already occurred, but the scientists plan to test that in future studies. They also have plans to study animals with injuries in order to determine how many joint treatments would be necessary to maintain the protective effect.

Grodzinsky says:

“If those animal studies yield positive results, the findings could be rapidly translated to human treatments. Because the drug is already approved for human use.”

Appropriate methods for drug delivery to localized joint cartilage is also a topic for future investigation.

If successful, the pending research would present a major change to the treatment of joint injuries, with a view to healing the damage, possibly avoiding the need for surgery and preventing chronic problems later on in life. It could in time cause a significant reduction in the number of people suffering from osteoarthritis.

By Rupert Shepherd BSc.

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Treating Young Athletes With Hip Pain Early May Be Key To Preventing Hip Arthritis

Main Category: Sports Medicine / Fitness
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Preventive Medicine
Article Date: 03 Sep 2011 – 0:00 PDT

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Treating young athletes with chronic hip pain may be the key to slowing or halting the progression of degenerative hip disease.

Recently, increased understanding of hip structural abnormalities has allowed specialists to better identify underlying hip conditions that previously went unrecognized and to more accurately diagnose hip problems in children, teens and young adults.

“Adolescent hip pain often strikes young athletes with structural abnormalities sooner than their less active counterparts, due to the stress their level of activity places on the hip,” said Ernest L. Sink, M.D., co-director of the Center for Hip Preservation at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Dr. Sink is also a member of the HSS Pediatric Orthopedic Service. His practice focuses on hip disorders and dysplasia in infants, children, adolescents and young adults.

“Any persistent hip pain in adolescents and young adults isn’t normal and should be evaluated with an x-ray and physical exam to make sure there’s no underlying structural problem that needs treatment,” Dr. Sink recommended.

In a recent online interview on the subject of adolescents and children with hip pain, Dr. Sink hoped to help patients, parents, coaches, physicians, and others to better understand the implications of chronic hip pain and its role in hip disease. This interview with Dr. Sink is available on the Center for Hip Preservation at Hospital for Special Surgery website (www.hss.edu/hippain). Formed in 2009, the Center provides individuals experiencing hip pain with proper diagnosis and treatment through innovative diagnostic imaging techniques, a full complement of non-operative and surgical approaches, and less invasive surgical procedures including arthroscopic surgery.

Increasingly, early treatment of chronic hip pain in young athletes and performers may have a long term impact on the health and mobility of the hip. With improved imaging techniques and a careful physical evaluation, it is simpler to diagnose some of the more subtle problems that cause hip pain. These more accurate diagnostic capabilities combined with improved treatments make it possible for hip specialists to slow or halt the progression of degenerative hip disease, return patients to their chosen activities, and sometimes reduce the need for more extensive surgeries.

“An occasional ache in the groin or hip may not be something about which a parent or young athlete should be concerned,” explained Dr. Sink. “But, chronic pain that does not improve should be evaluated by a surgeon who sees hip problems on a day-to-day basis.” Such hip pain occurs in young women and young men who place stress on their hips with sports (especially in dancers, hurdlers or baseball catchers) because these individuals’ activities involve the hip moving beyond its normal constraints.

With more than 44 million children and adolescents participating in sports nationwide, it’s important for parents, coaches and dance instructors to know what to look for in young athletes and performers who may be at risk:

— An adolescent with chronic hip or groin pain that is interfering with their sports or performing.

— A history of hip problems in the family.

— Risk factors for hip dysplasia found by a pediatrician that previously had not caused symptoms. Hip dysplasia can remain silent for many years and manifest itself via hip pain during adolescence.

— The difference between growing pains and chronic hip pain. Growing pains usually occur in children under the age of 10 and take the form of pain in the legs, knee and hips at night after a day of activity. The following day, however, the child is usually up and active. Chronic hip pain prevents a child from participating in activities at their usual level of intensity.

“I always tell my patients that it’s important to conserve the hip and to manage an underlying structural problem early, before it gets too late,” explained Dr. Sink, who studied hip surgery techniques under the world-renowned Reinhold Ganz, M.D., at the University of Berne in Switzerland.

Dr. Sink performs a range of hip surgical procedures, including hip osteotomy, Ganz or periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) and surgical hip dislocation. Conditions for which young patients are commonly referred to Dr. Sink include hip dysplasia in all ages including developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, Perthes disease and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE).

“Sometimes if too much time goes by and a patient is living with this pain on an ongoing basis, when they finally do come to us, we look at the radiograph and it’s too late to do anything effective,” Dr. Sink continued. “Through education of other physicians, parents, coaches and instructors about what to look for, hip conditions can be managed with effective treatments specific to a patient’s particular problem.”

Source: Hospital for Special Surgery

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Glucocorticoid Treatment May Prevent Long Term Damage To Joints

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Preventive Medicine
Article Date: 03 Sep 2011 – 0:00 PDT

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Joint injury can result in irreversible damage of cartilage which, despite treatment and surgery, often eventually leads to osteoarthritis (OA) in later life. New research published in BioMed Central’s open access journal Arthritis Research Therapy demonstrates that short term treatment of damaged cartilage with glucocorticoids can reduce long term degenerative changes and may provide hope for prevention of OA after injury.

A normal joint is covered by a layer of cartilage containing proteoglycans such as aggrecan and lubricating fluid containing glycosaminoglycans (GAG) such as hyaluronic acid. In a double whammy, after injury proteoglycans and other molecules in cartilage begin to break down and the synthesis of these proteoglycans within cartilage is reduced. Additionally proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 are released into the synovial fluid after injury and further increase GAG loss from cartilage.

Using a ‘worst-case scenario’ system in which cartilage was subjected to mechanical injury and bombarded with immune system-stimulating bio-molecules (TNFα and IL-6) the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) was able to reduce GAG loss and restore proteoglycan synthesis levels to normal.

Prof Alan Grodzinsky from the MIT Center for Biomedical Engineering said, “Glucocorticoid injections are sometimes used to relieve the pain of established osteoarthritis, but there are concerns about long-term use. Our results suggest that short-term glucocorticoid treatment after joint injury may help restore components of cartilage to preinjury levels and consequently may prevent the long term changes which lead to osteoarthritis.”

Sources: BioMed Central Limited, AlphaGalileo Foundation.

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Sjogren’s Syndrome: How Did It Affect Venus Williams’ Performance?

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Main Category: Immune System / Vaccines
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 01 Sep 2011 – 9:00 PDT

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Venus Williams, sister of tennis champion Serena and a seven-time major champion and two-time US Open titlist herself, has played 11 matches on the women’s tour this year.
However, as the tennis world focuses its attention to the United States and the US Open in New York, Williams has again had to withdraw from competition due to a somewhat rare autoimmune disorder called Sjogren’s syndrome. An autoimmune disorder means that your immune system mistakenly attacks your body’s own cells and tissues. How did it affect Williams is the question, and what is her tennis future if any?

Although you can develop Sjogren’s syndrome at any age, most people are older than 40 at the time of diagnosis. The condition is much more common in women. Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms, which often subside with time. Venus is currently 31 years of age. Nine out of ten Sjogren’s patients are women in fact, and it is estimated to strike as many as 4 million people in the United States alone making it the second most common autoimmune rheumatic disease.

Throughout her 17-year pro career, Williams has consistently refused to talk about injuries or illnesses, adopting the attitude that if she is entered in a tournament, she is healthy enough to play. However, her career may have now come to an end.

Here are treatment options and an explanation of the disease….

Progression of Sjogren’s syndrome is different for everyone. Most people with this disease have chronic dryness of the eyes and mouth that lasts throughout their lives. If your symptoms are not relieved by home treatment and medicines and your disease begins to affect other parts of the body, your doctor may prescribe stronger medicine or recommend surgery.

If extremely dry eyes are not helped by tear substitutes, topical cyclosporine ophthalmic eye drops may provide relief.

If neither tear substitutes nor cyclosporine eye drops ease dry eyes, a doctor may perform a surgical procedure called punctal occlusion, in which he or she places temporary or permanent plugs in your tear ducts (lacrimal ducts) to help keep moisture in your eyes. These plugs keep tears from draining away from the eyes and leaving them dry.

It appears that Venus’ ailments took on a more severe form: chronic joint pain. For joint pain, chronic inflammation in saliva and tear glands, or other serious symptoms, treatment may include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

NSAIDs may provide relief from inflammation, but people with Sjogren’s syndrome may be more susceptible to developing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) after taking NSAIDs, which is also a big problem, especially for a serious athlete.

There are also corticosteroids (such as prednisone), which are used to relieve muscle and joint inflammation but can have serious side effects, including osteoporosis, glaucoma, and diabetes.
Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), also known as slow-acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs) may be prescribed alone or in combination to manage the symptoms of joint and muscle pain and dry skin from Sjogren’s syndrome. DMARDs that may be prescribed include hydroxychloroquine sulfate or methotrexate.

To conclude in a statement, Williams said:


“(It is) an ongoing medical condition that affects my energy level and causes fatigue and joint pain. I enjoyed playing my first match here and wish I could continue but right now I am unable to. I am thankful I finally have a diagnosis and am now focused on getting better and returning to the court soon.”

Written by Sy Kraft

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