Preventing The Formation Of Amyloid Fibrils

Main Category: Blood / Hematology
Also Included In: Arthritis / Rheumatology;  Urology / Nephrology;  Pain / Anesthetics
Article Date: 30 Aug 2011 – 0:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  
<!– rate icon rate article


Patient / Public:5 stars

5 (2 votes)

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

A molecule which can stop the formation of long protein strands, known as amyloid fibrils, that cause joint pain in kidney dialysis patients has been identified by researchers at the University of Leeds.

The discovery could lead to new methods to identify drugs to prevent, treat or halt the progression of other conditions in which amyloid fibrils play a part, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Type II diabetes.

The research, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and the Wellcome Trust, is published in Nature Chemical Biology.

The team – from Leeds’ Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and Faculty of Biological Sciences – found that an antibiotic known as Rifamycin SV was able to prevent the protein β2microglobulin (β2m) from forming into fibrils. β2m is known to accumulate in renal dialysis patients and forms fibrils within the joints, causing extreme pain and arthritis.

By using a specialised analytical technique called ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS), the researchers were able to see at what stage of the process Rifamycin SV prevented amyloid fibril formation. They believe the technique could enable potential drugs to be identified for the many other proteins which form amyloid fibrils, linked to a wide range of human disorders.

“Traditional drug design for diseases like Alzheimer’s is incredibly difficult because the proteins you’re trying to target are changing shape and structure all the time,” explains University of Leeds Professor of Structural Molecular Biology, Sheena Radford. “It’s like trying to consistently pick out one bead of a particular shape from box of potentially millions of similar beads. This new technique allows us to see the shape of the protein as it changes, so we can more easily identify exactly which part we need to target.”

In their normal, folded state, proteins are unable to link together to form long fibrillar assemblies, but if they unfold, they expose areas where they can bind to each other. Initially they form small groups of two, three or four proteins, and then these link into long strands, which twist together to form fibrils.

Most analytical techniques can only show the mass of the protein or its make-up in terms of amino acids, neither of which changes as the protein unfolds. Others are unable to look at individual molecules within complex mixtures. However, IMS-MS can measure the mass and shape of a protein, allowing researchers to watch the unfolding process and the aggregation into small groups and then assembly into the fibril and to find which of these species is able to bind a ligand and stop the assembly process.

In the research published today, researchers found that Rifamycin SV stopped the formation of protein fibrils by binding to an unfolded protein molecule with a particular shape, enabling for the first time, an unfolded protein of a particular shape to be identified as a target for the design of new inhibitors of fibril assembly.

“We’re fortunate to be one of the few universities in the UK able to use IMS-MS to study amyloid fibril formation,” says Professor of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry, Alison Ashcroft, who specialises in this type of analysis. “Although fibrils take years to develop in the body, we are able to ‘grow’ them in hours in the lab. By using IMS-MS to help us map exactly how they are formed, we can better understand the mechanism by which it happens and – we hope – find ways to stop it.”

Read more blood / hematology news



Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.

Small actions, big impact

Ever wonder what happens with dollars donated to TriMedx Foundation?

“Hi, how are U? the costomAir machine in ICU doesn’t stabilize. What can I do to fix it. I’m waiting for you, co it’s a emergency.”

Joseph Rivière, a BMET trainee at Hôpital Sacré Coeur (HSC) in Haiti, posed this question in an email to TriMedx Foundation Volunteer Mike Hoyt, a clinical engineer with St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis, Ind. A couple of replies later, Rivière fired off his final message:

“Think you very much, I just follow your instruction and I repaired [the equipment].”

And so a patient who might have been sent home without proper care got the help he or she needed. Such is the impact of TriMedx Foundation volunteers and donors. Day after day, donations to TriMedx Foundation continue to make a difference:

“Hi, we find a good pleasure to talk to you about BIOMED tech project at HSC from Milot. For this month we’ve learn many things and have a lot of information about the equipments in the Hospital. Please, ask the trainer James Fanfan to come down again. Cos we think it very successful.” Joseph Rivière Denis Alce, HSC 

“We continue to look forward to the wonderful opportunity that our technicians are gaining through this program.” Tim Traynor, HSC

 “hi Mary, how you doing? I’m denis Alce a student in biomed tech i’m in training now in hospital sacre coeur in milot of haiti i would like to keep touch with you. Gods bless.” Denis Alce, HSC

  “Hi Mary, Many thanks … We are very grateful for the help and support of TriMedx.” Denise Kelly, The CRUDEM Foundation Inc. 

Ever wonder what happens with dollars donated to TriMedx Foundation? Now you know: 100% of your donated dollars go straight to the mission field, whether it’s sending technicians to repair broken equipment or equipping local hospitals to maintain that equipment after we’re gone.

Please take a moment to help us spread the word. Thank you, again, for helping us extend hope and health to hurting families around the world.

All the best,

Mary Owens
Development Director
TriMedx Foundation
mary.owens@trimedxfoundation.org
(317) 275-1555



Eco World Content From Across The Internet.

EcoPressed
Featured on EcoPressed


Research: Using smartphones for frugal driving

Advertisement

Block Scientific Offers High Quality Lab Equipment from Respected Brands in the Industry

As per the score card of Sekisui Diagnostics, Block Scientific scored 100 % and has remained a preferred supplier on their approved supplier list. Block Scientific has been very responsive to Sekisui’s needs while at the same time providing valuable customer support.

Block Scientific is recognized as a supplier of high quality products to its valued customers

With a range of products from the most respected brands in the industry, Block Scientific can meet all your laboratory equipment requirements, affordably and efficiently.

Sekisui Diagnostics P.E.I. Inc Endorses Block Scientific as a Preferred Supplier

With a view to helping healthcare professionals engaged in research and lab applications, Block Scientific provides quality laboratory equipment and supplies to customers on a global level. For many years now, we have been supplying lab products to Sekisui Diagnostics P.E.I. Inc., a global medical company offering a unique product portfolio for diagnostic manufacturers and clinical laboratories worldwide.

As per Sekisui’s score card outlining the performances of suppliers for the year 2010, Block Scientific scored 100 % and has remained a preferred supplier on their approved supplier list. Appreciating Block Scientific’s continued service and support, the company endorses that Block Scientific has been very responsive to its needs while also providing valuable customer support.

About Block Scientific

Based in New York, Block Scientific is a US company dedicated to supplying good value laboratory equipment at reasonable prices. Our aim is to meet the laboratory equipment requirements of worldwide clients, for promoting medical treatment, research and education.

Please visit our website www.blockscientific.com or call 1-866-203-5777 (Toll Free) for more information about the medical laboratory equipment that Block Scientific provides. To order online, visit our store: www.blockscientificstore.com/

Buy Used Medical Equipment

Buy used or refurbished medical equipment as an effective alternative to purchasing new. Large modern healthcare facilities often liquidate their equipment only after a few years of use and only a short journey on their expected lifespan.  You can find this equipment for sale at prices that may assist your facility in expanding its capabilities beyond its forecasted budget. The growing presence of the internet has allowed many medical equipment dealers to offer quality inspected and certified medical equipment to the worldwide market.  Why is this important?  It is important in providing low cost, high quality medical equipment solutions to providers that may have had to pass on the opportunity to purchase the equipment from OEMs in the past.

Used medical equipment can provide even more dependability than a new OEM unit. When purchasing used medical equipment it is important to inquire that the unit that you are purchasing has been inspected individually.  If you are choosing a refurbished or certified unit, the equipment has received the highest level of testing.  New units are often only tested in samples increments, such as one from each hundred off the production line, depending on the manufacturer. It is easy to see why many healthcare providers are confident in their purchase and use of used medical equipment.

Refurbished warranties can rival an OEM offering and often are more comprehensive; some may even include an immediate replacement.  These warranties are available from knowledgeable and reputable dealers worldwide. Medical Equipment Dynamics, Inc. offers a wide variety of used, refurbished, and warranty plans on a range of medical equipment. Contact their sales team today to inquire on all the benefits of purchasing used medical equipment.



Eco World Content From Across The Internet.


Featured on EcoPressed


Standing Against Oil Sands—and Standing for the Climate

Advertisement

Medical, Medical Equipment, Used Medical Equipment, Medical Equipment Sales, Decommissioned Medical Equipment, Refirbished Medical Equipment

, , , , , ,

June 1, 2011

Leave a comment


Loss Of Health Insurance Through Unemployment Means Many Skip Needed Health Care

Main Category: Health Insurance / Medical Insurance
Also Included In: Medicare / Medicaid / SCHIP;  Compliance;  Public Health
Article Date: 26 Aug 2011 – 0:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  
<!– rate icon rate article

Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

Nearly three-quarters (72%) of people who lost their health insurance when they lost their jobs over the last two years said that they skipped needed health care or did not fill prescriptions because of cost, according to a new Commonwealth Fund report. The same proportion is also struggling with medical bills or medical debt, compared to about half (49%) who lost jobs but not their health insurance.

Six in 10 working Americans rely on health insurance obtained through their employer, and when an estimated 15 million working-age adults lost their jobs and their employer-based insurance between 2008 and 2010, 9 million became uninsured. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA), people employed by companies with 20 or more workers and have health insurance sponsored by that company can keep their health insurance for up to 18 months if they lose their job. However, because unemployed workers must pay the full premium, few people elect to continue their coverage through COBRA.

The report finds that once the major coverage provisions of the Affordable Care Act are implemented in 2014, job loss will not automatically mean going without health insurance, because the newly unemployed will have greatly expanded health insurance options, including subsidies to purchase insurance through exchanges, and expanded access to Medicaid coverage.

“Currently, for a majority of Americans, losing a job also means losing health insurance,” said Commonwealth Fund Vice President and report co-author Sara Collins. “To make matters worse, once you are unemployed and uninsured, it’s nearly impossible to afford COBRA or buy an individual policy. However, when it is fully implemented in 2014, the Affordable Care Act will usher in a new era for the unemployed, who will have a variety of options for comprehensive and affordable health insurance.”


Unemployed, Uninsured, and Without Insurance Options

The report, based on findings from The 2010 Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, notes that in 2010, 57 percent of those who said they had lost their job with health benefits in the past two years became uninsured because they had limited options for acquiring affordable health insurance that met their needs. In Realizing Health Reform’s Potential: When Unemployed Means Uninsured: The Toll of Job Loss on Health Coverage and How the Affordable Care Act Will Help, the authors find that COBRA is less likely to be an option for those who need it most: only 25 percent of workers with incomes less than 133 percent of poverty (just under $30,000 for a family of four in 2010) would have been eligible for COBRA if they had lost their jobs, compared with 73 percent of workers with household incomes at 400 percent of poverty or more (just over $88,000 for a family of four in 2010).

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 substantially offset the cost of COBRA for some unemployed workers by covering 65 percent of their COBRA premiums. Despite the fact that several studies have found that COBRA enrollment among eligible individuals increased after the subsidies went into effect, helping millions of people who lost their jobs stay insured, these subsidies have not been offered to newly laid-off workers since last year.

“Clearly COBRA subsidies made a big difference for millions of unemployed people who had no other option for affordable health insurance coverage,” said Michelle Doty, Commonwealth Fund Vice President and co-author of the report. “As the economy continues to struggle to recover, extending those subsidies would assure that workers, particularly those with lower incomes, could maintain their health insurance.”

The individual insurance market is also not a viable option for those who have lost a job and health insurance. The report finds that 60 percent of people who shopped for individual insurance policies over the last three years were unable to find a plan they could afford, and 35 percent were turned down by an insurer, charged more because of their health status, or had a specific health problem excluded from their coverage.

According to the report, the lack of viable health insurance options can take a toll on the health and financial security of those who have lost jobs along with their health insurance benefits:

  • 72 percent of respondents who became uninsured when they lost their job-based benefits said they didn’t fill a prescription, skipped a recommended test, treatment, or follow-up, had a medical problem and did not visit a doctor or clinic, or did not get specialist care because of cost.
  • 72 percent of respondents who became uninsured when they lost their job-based benefits reported problems with medical bills, including not being able to pay their bills; paying off medical debt over time; being contacted by a collections agency over unpaid bills; and changing their way of life to pay medical bills.
  • 40 percent of adults who lost their job-based benefits and became uninsured were forced into making difficult financial tradeoffs in the past year because of medical bills: 32 percent had used up all their savings; 27 percent could not pay for basic necessities like food, heat or rent; 14 percent took on credit card debt; and 9 percent took out a home mortgage or loan.


How Health Reform Helps The Unemployed and Uninsured

The report finds that some early health reform provisions, including allowing young adults up to age 26 to remain on their parents’ health insurance, and the creation of pre-existing condition insurance plans in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, are already helping some of the unemployed and uninsured. However, the reforms that will have the most significant impact will take effect in 2014 when Medicaid is substantially expanded to cover single adults earning up to $14,484 a year and families of four making up to $29,726 a year. In addition sliding scale premium tax credits will be available for single adults earning up to $43,560 and families of four making up to $89,400 to purchase private policies through new state insurance exchanges. People who buy health insurance through the exchanges will enjoy new consumer protections that will assure they won’t have to pay high premiums or be denied insurance because of their health status.

Despite the new protections, the report authors say that there will still be a role for COBRA in 2014, to reduce the burden switching insurance plans places on families, and to curb federal and state administrative costs associated with changing plans to fill short gaps in coverage.

Between now and 2014, the report authors recommend that policy makers continue the current protections in place for unemployed Americans, including extending jobless benefits and re-establishing the COBRA subsidies that helped millions of Americans who lost their jobs during the recession keep their health insurance coverage.

“It’s clear from this report that losing a job and health insurance simultaneously is a serious threat to a family’s health and financial stability,” said Commonwealth Fund President Karen Davis. “The Affordable Care Act will assure that families already struggling with the devastation of unemployment will still be able to get the health care they need and will be protected if they become seriously ill.”

Read more health insurance / medical insurance news



Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.

Interested in getting your company name in front of the decision makers?

If your like me, getting your company name in front of the decision makers can be quite the task. I work in the health care field and the competition is stiff. As with most new businesses and ideas, it all starts with a need. Well my need was getting my name in front of the decision makers, that’s how locatecare.com came about! Check it out and see if we can help you get your name out there. It’s very affordable and growing in leaps and bounds, so get in early at a great price. locatecare.com it pays to advertise.

Patients Experience Reduced Arthritis Pain And Increased Quality Of Life When Realistic Physical Activity Goals Are Achieved

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Article Date: 26 Aug 2011 – 0:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  
<!– rate icon rate article


Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

Researchers from The Netherlands report that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have higher levels of self-efficacy for physical activity are more likely to achieve their physical activity goals. According to the study now available in Arthritis Care Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), achievement of physical activity goals is associated with lower self-reported arthritis pain and increased health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that RA, a chronic autoimmune disease causing inflammation in the lining of joints, affects nearly 1% of the world population. In the U.S., the ACR reports 1.3 million adults suffer with RA. Studies indicate that RA patients cite pain and stiffness as the most limiting factors of their illness, and report lower HRQOL than healthy individuals. RA patients who do not engage in regular physical activity have a more pronounced effect from the disease.

For the current study, Keegan Knittle, MSc, from Leiden University in The Netherlands and colleagues surveyed 106 patients with RA to assess physical activity, motivation and self-efficacy for physical activity, level of arthritis pain, and quality of life. After six months, participants were surveyed again and asked to indicate the extent to which they achieved their baseline physical activity goal. Previous research has shown that self-efficacy, described as one’s belief in his or her own capabilities to perform a specific behavior, is associated with increased physical activity participation among RA patients.

Results showed that 75% of participants rated their physical activity goal achievement at 50% or more. Higher levels of self-efficacy for physical activity increased the likelihood that patients would achieve their physical activity goals, and goal achievement had a direct positive effect upon quality of life outcomes. Researchers found that patients who achieved their physical activity goal reported less arthritis pain and greater quality of life. No differences were found between men and women who completed the surveys, or between patients newly diagnosed versus those with RA for 10 years or more.

Knittle concluded, “Our results suggest that an increased focus on self-efficacy enhancement, realistic goal-setting, and techniques that increase the likelihood of goal achievement will assist clinicians and researchers develop interventions that have a positive impact on pain reduction and quality of life outcomes for RA patients.”

Read more arthritis / rheumatology news



Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.

New Gene Identified That Affects Levels Of Pain In Osteoarthritis

Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Genetics;  Pain / Anesthetics;  Seniors / Aging
Article Date: 26 Aug 2011 – 2:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  
<!– rate icon rate article


Patient / Public:not yet rated

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

Researchers have revealed a new gene associated with osteoarthritis. This is only the third gene to be identified for this painful and debilitating disease that affects more than 40 per cent of people aged more than 70 years.

The disease-associated variant, in the gene MCF2L, was discovered when Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute researchers used data from the 1000 Genomes Project to increase the power of their genome-wide association scan. The preliminary stage of the original arcOGEN study, funded by Arthritis Research UK, compared the genomes of 3,177 people with osteoarthritis with 4,894 people from the general population and looked at 600,000 variants.

At that level of detail, no new genes were identified (although the full study has yet to be published). By imputing the data from the 1000 Genomes Project, the new study was able to scan for 7.2 million variants and revealed the association of MCF2L with osteoarthritis without requiring any new sequencing to be carried out.

“By using the 1000 Genomes Project data to add value to our original genome-wide association scan for osteoarthritis, we have uncovered a disease-associated gene that had previously remained hidden,” says Dr Eleftheria Zeggini, senior author from the Sanger Institute. “We were able to analyse our results in greater detail and zoom in on variants that we hadn’t been able to identify before. We hope that this approach and our findings will help to improve our biological understanding of this very painful disease.”

Osteoarthritis is a complex condition and researchers have found it difficult to identify its genes. Only two loci have been found so far in European populations – GDF5 and a signal from a region on chromosome 7.

The newly identified gene, MCF2L, is found on chromosome 13 and regulates a nerve growth factor (NGF). It has been reported that when people with osteoarthritis in the knee are treated with a humanized monoclonal antibody against NGF, they experience less pain and show improvement in their movement. This suggests that MCF2L is involved in the development of osteoarthritis and provides a new focus for future research.

To ensure that the variant of MCF2L is associated with the development of osteoarthritis, the team worked with international collaborators to investigate 19,041 people with arthritis and 25,504 people without the condition. A number of centres across Europe collaborated by screening people in Iceland, Estonia, the Netherlands and the UK for the newly identified variant to corroborate the association.

“The discovery of this MCF2L variant suggests a possible genetic link to the finding that regulating NGF is important in knee osteoarthritis, and is supported by the fact that the variant is more strongly associated with knee osteoarthritis than hip osteoarthritis in the study,” says Aaron Day-Williams, first author of the study from the Sanger Institute. “We hope the identification of this variant will lead to further insights into the biological processes at work and offer potential treatment targets.”

The study’s findings are based on the work of the arcOGEN Consortium, which has been funded by Arthritis Research UK and is a vital supporter of research in this area.

“Osteoarthritis is a complex disease with many genetic causes. Yet it has proved very difficult to find the genes involved and help us to identify potential areas of treatment,” says Alan Silman, Medical Director of Arthritis Research UK. “We are delighted that researchers at the Sanger Institute have been able to identify a new gene associated with this painful condition and offer new lines of research for possible treatments. We are also excited that employing the technique of using the 1000 Genomes Project data to investigate genetic associations in far greater depth could reveal even greater insights into this debilitating disease.”

Funding

This work was supported by Arthritis Research UK and the Wellcome

Read more arthritis / rheumatology news



Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.

Physical Activity Goals Can Greatly Benefit Lives Of RA Patients

Editor’s Choice
Academic Journal
Main Category: Arthritis / Rheumatology
Also Included In: Rehabilitation / Physical Therapy;  Sports Medicine / Fitness
Article Date: 25 Aug 2011 – 4:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  
<!– rate icon rate article


Patient / Public:5 stars

5 (1 votes)

Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

According to an investigation now available in Arthritis Care and Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), investigators from The Netherlands report physical activity goals are more likely to be achieved if the patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has a higher level of self-efficacy for physical activity. Achievement of physical activity goals is linked with lower self-reported arthritis pains and increased health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

RA is a chronic autoimmune disease which causes inflammation in the lining of joints and The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that it affects almost 1% of the worlds population. The ACR reports that in the U.S. 1.3 million adults suffer from RA. Investigations revealed that patients cite pain and stiffness as the biggest limiting factors of their illness, and report lower HRQOL than healthy individuals. Those with RA who do not engage in regular physical activity have a more pronounced effect from the disease.

Keegan Knittle, MSc, from Leiden University in The Netherlands and colleagues surveyed 106 patients with RA to evaluate physical activity, motivation and self-efficacy for physical activity, level of arthritis pain, and quality of life, for the current investigation. After six months, participants were surveyed again and asked to indicate the extent to which to which they achieved their baseline physical activity goal. Previous investigations have revealed that self-efficacy, described as one’s belief in his or her own capabilities to perform a specific behavior, is connected with raised physical activity participation among patients with RA.

75% of participants rated their physical activity goal achievement at 50% or more, results revealed. The likelihood that patients would achieve their goals increased with higher levels of self-efficacy for physical activity, and achieving goals had a direct positive effect upon quality of life outcomes. Those who achieved their physical activity goal reported less arthritis pain and greater quality of life, investigators discovered. Also no differences were discovered between men and women who completed the surveys, or between those newly diagnosed versus patients with RA for 10 years or more.

Knittle concluded:

“Our results suggest that an increased focus on self-efficacy enhancement, realistic goal-setting, and techniques that increase the likelihood of goal achievement will assist clinicians and researchers develop interventions that have a positive impact on pain reduction and quality of life outcomes for RA patients.”

Written by Grace Rattue

Copyright: Medical News Today

Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Read more arthritis / rheumatology news



Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.