Your School Assignment For The Day: Spelling And Specs

DELANO, Calif. — Daisy Leon struggles to sit still and read the letters on the eye chart. Her responses tumble out in a quiet, confused garble.

“You know your letters?” asks optometrist Jolly Mamauag-Camat. “Umm, ya,” says Daisy, almost inaudibly.

The 6-year-old kindergartner had her eyes examined for the first time on a recent Thursday morning. Although she hadn’t complained about headaches or blurry vision, her grandmother noticed she’d been inching closer to watch television.

After Daisy’s failed attempts at reading the eye chart, Mamauag-Camat inspects the little girl’s eyes through a phoropter and writes her a prescription for glasses.

WHO warns against ‘fatal’ complacency in global coronavirus fight

GENEVA/DUBAI (Reuters) – No country should make the “fatal mistake” of assuming it will be spared the coronavirus, the World Health Organization said on Thursday, as governments from Iran to Australia raced to contain the epidemic’s rapid global spread.

With new infections reported around the world now surpassing those in mainland China, WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said even rich nations should prepare for surprises.

“No country should assume it won’t get cases, that would be a fatal mistake, quite literally,” Tedros said, pointing to Italy, where authorities said three more people had died, bringing the toll from Europe’s worst outbreak of the illness to 17. Confirmed cases there rose to 650.

Kuwait has 43 confirmed cases of coronavirus: health ministry

FILE PHOTO: A Kuwaiti boy wears a protective face mask, following the outbreak of the new coronavirus, as he throws water at passing cars, during celebrations for the 29th Kuwait Liberation Day from the Iraqi occupation, in Kuwait City, February 26, 2020. REUTERS/Stephanie McGehee

DUBAI (Reuters) – Kuwait now has 43 confirmed cases of coronavirus, according to a health ministry official on Thursday, who added all cases involved people who had been to Iran.

Iran, which lies east of Kuwait, has experienced the largest death toll from coronavirus outside China, with 26 deaths and 245 cases.

Cellular metabolism plays key role in dictating the fate decision between pathogenic and regulatory T cells

Patients with autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis have an imbalance between two types of immune system T cells. Destructive Th17 cells that mediate chronic inflammation are elevated, and regulatory T cells, or Treg cells, which suppress inflammatory responses and play a protective role in autoimmune disorders, are diminished.

Both cells differentiate from the same precursors — naïve CD4 T cells — and the beginning of their change to either Th17 or Treg cells starts with the same signal. Subsequently, a fate decision occurs, like a fork in the road, steering the changing CD4 cells to become either inflammatory T cells or regulatory T cells.

Trusting Injection Drug Users With IV Antibiotics At Home: It Can Work

Two mornings a week, Arthur Jackson clears space on half of his cream-colored sofa. He sets out a few rolls of tape and some gauze, then waits for a knock on his front door.

“This is Brenda’s desk,” Jackson said with a chuckle.

Brenda Mastricola is his visiting nurse. After she arrives at Jackson’s home in Boston, she joins him on the couch and starts by taking his blood pressure. Then she changes the bandages on Jackson’s right foot. His big toe was amputated at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in November. A bacterial infection, osteomyelitis, had destroyed the bone.

Trump accuses cable TV of making coronavirus look ‘as bad as possible’

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump accused two cable TV news channels of presenting the danger from the coronavirus in as bad a light as possible and upsetting financial markets, as public health officials warned Americans to prepare for a likely outbreak.

Trump on Wednesday wrote on Twitter that CNN and MSNBC, both of which frequently carry criticism of him, “are doing everything possible to make (the coronavirus) look as bad as possible, including panicking markets,” adding: “USA in great shape!”

Facebook to ban misleading ads about coronavirus

FILE PHOTO: A Facebook logo is displayed on a smartphone in this illustration taken January 6, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo

(Reuters) – Facebook Inc said on Wednesday it would ban advertisements for products offering any cures or prevention around the coronavirus outbreak, and those that create a sense of urgency around the situation.

The disease, believed to have originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan late last year, has killed more than 2,700 people.

The announcement by the social-media giant comes as it faces increasing regulatory scrutiny over the type of content posted on its platform, specifically items reflecting extreme ideologies and fake news.

Researchers reveal new details about how joint inflammation evolves in rheumatoid arthritis

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have revealed new details about how joint inflammation evolves in rheumatoid arthritis, and the cells that prolong the inflammatory attack.

In both laboratory models and human clinical samples, the research team pinpointed immune cells called natural killer (NK) cells as an unexpected source of the inflammatory protein GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis, the first clue that these cells contribute to inflammatory autoimmune diseases. The research also explained how GM-CSF signals to other immune cells to prolong joint inflammation, and how GM-CSF signaling to immune cells is kept in check in healthy joints.

Opioid prescription for chronic non-cancer pain increased in the last two-and-a-half decades

The number of people with chronic non-cancer pain prescribed an opioid medicine worldwide increased in the last two-and-a-half decades. But there was only a small number of studies reporting prescription data outside the United States, finds research led by the University of Sydney.

Chronic pain unrelated to cancer includes conditions such as chronic lower back pain, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

The researchers point to guidelines such as those from the Centres of Disease Control and Prevention in the United States that discourage the use of opioids to manage chronic non-cancer pain because of concerns about harmful effects and the lack of evidence about effectiveness. The use of opioids in the US and deaths from overdoses and addiction has been said to have reached epidemic proportions.

Needy Patients ‘Caught In The Middle’ As Insurance Titan Drops Doctors

BAYONNE, N.J. — For five years, Rasha Salama has taken her two children to Dr. Inas Wassef, a pediatrician a few blocks from her home in this blue-collar town across the bay from New York City.

Salama likes the doctor because Wassef speaks her native language — Arabic — and has office hours at convenient times for children.

“She knows my kids, answers the phone, is open on Saturdays and is everything for me,” she said.

But UnitedHealthcare is dropping Wassef — and hundreds of other doctors in its central and northern New Jersey Medicaid physician network. The move is forcing thousands of low-income patients such as Salama to forsake longtime physicians.