Judge Strikes Down ACA Putting Law In Legal Peril — Again

The future of the Affordable Care Act is threatened — again — this time by a ruling Friday from a federal district court judge in Texas.

Judge Reed C. O’Connor struck down the law, siding with a group of 18 Republican state attorneys general and two GOP governors who brought the case. O’Connor said the tax bill passed by Congress last December effectively rendered the entire health law unconstitutional.

Trump hails judge’s ruling against Obamacare as ‘great’

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump on Saturday hailed a court decision against Obamacare as “a great ruling for our country,” while a U.S. government official said the decision by a Texas judge would have no immediate impact on health coverage.

U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor in Fort Worth, Texas, on Friday said that Obamacare, known formally as the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA), was unconstitutional based on its mandate requiring that people buy health insurance.

Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone

Bloodwork was supposed to be the last step in Isela’s application for life insurance. But when she arrived at the lab, her appointment had been canceled.

“That was my first warning,” Isela said. She contacted her insurance agent and was told her application was denied because something on her medication list indicated that Isela uses drugs. Isela, a registered nurse who works in an addiction treatment program at Boston Medical Center, scanned her med list. It showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone — brand name Narcan.

No immediate health coverage changes from Obamacare ruling: government

(Reuters) – There will be no immediate health coverage impact from a federal judge’s ruling that the Affordable Care Act (ACA), commonly known as Obamacare, is unconstitutional, as it is expected to be appealed through higher courts, a government official said.

A box of masks is shown in the emergency room at Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, California, U.S., January 18, 2018. REUTERS/Mike Blake

U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor in Fort Worth, Texas, on Friday sided with a coalition of 20 states that argued requiring people to pay for insurance coverage is illegal because a change in tax law last year eliminated a penalty for not having health insurance.

Special Report: J&J knew for decades that asbestos lurked in its Baby Powder

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Darlene Coker knew she was dying. She just wanted to know why.

Darlene Coker is shown on a kitchen table full of many personal pictures of her family life in California, U.S. August 15, 2018. Picture taken August 15, 2018. REUTERS/Mike Blake

She knew that her cancer, mesothelioma, arose in the delicate membrane surrounding her lungs and other organs. She knew it was as rare as it was deadly, a signature of exposure to asbestos. And she knew it afflicted mostly men who inhaled asbestos dust in mines and industries such as shipbuilding that used the carcinogen before its risks were understood.

Can Alzheimer’s Be Spread? Mouse Study Hints It’s Possible

News Picture: Can Alzheimer's Be Spread? Mouse Study Hints It's PossibleBy Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A brain protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease might potentially be transmitted to people during neurological procedures, a new preliminary study suggests.

Genetically engineered lab mice developed amyloid-beta deposits in their brains after they were injected with amyloid-laced samples of human growth hormone taken from decades-old human cadavers, researchers found.

“We have now provided experimental evidence to support our hypothesis that amyloid-beta pathology can be transmitted to people from contaminated materials,” said senior researcher Dr. John Collinge. He is head of University College London’s department of neurodegenerative disease.

In California, Doctors Accused Of Sexual Misconduct Often Get Second Chances

The doctor instructed his patient to stand in front of him. He cupped her crotch and inserted his fingers into her vagina through her clothes, moving his hand repeatedly to her rectal area. Then he squeezed her breasts, according to a formal accusation filed by the Medical Board of California.

The patient, accompanied to the appointment by her 4-year-old granddaughter, asked why that was necessary to diagnose a urinary tract infection, according to the documents. He told her to let him do his job.

Menopause-related sexual, urinary problems tied to worse quality of life

(Reuters Health) – – Severe sexual and urinary health problems after menopause are linked with poorer quality of life, a recent study suggests.

Researchers examined survey data from 2,160 women, ages 45 to 75, who reported at least one symptom after menopause related to what’s known as vulvovaginal atrophy, a common condition that can include symptoms like vaginal dryness, painful intercourse and urinary incontinence.

Overall, women with severe vulvovaginal atrophy symptoms reported a much worse quality of life than women with mild symptoms, researchers report in Menopause.

J&J shares nosedive on report it knew of asbestos in Baby Powder

(Reuters) – Shares of Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N) fell 10 percent on Friday and were on track to post their biggest percentage drop in more than 16 years, after Reuters reported that the pharma major knew for decades that cancer-causing asbestos lurked in its Baby Powder.

FILE PHOTO: A Johnson & Johnson building is shown in Irvine, California, U.S., January 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Photo

The decline in shares erased about $40 billion from the company’s market capitalization, with investors worrying about the impact of the report as it faces thousands of talc-related lawsuits.

Certain Female Vets May Face Higher Dementia Risk

News Picture: Certain Female Vets May Face Higher Dementia RiskBy Maureen Salamon
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Alzheimer’s News

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The toll of U.S. military service can be steep for female veterans, with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and brain injury each significantly raising the odds of later dementia, new research suggests.

The study, of more than 100,000 older women veterans, spotlights the risk factors stemming from military service that can lead to thinking and memory problems down the road, said study author Dr. Kristine Yaffe.