A Tale Of Two States: California, Texas And The Latest ACA Repeal Bid

The GOP’s latest attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act wobbled on Friday as Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said he could not support it. But the bill known as Graham-Cassidy isn’t dead yet. And whatever its fate, the long-held Republican goal it embodies — to fundamentally change how the government funds Medicaid — will survive.

Graham-Cassidy would dramatically redistribute federal funds to states. And, generally, states that expanded Medicaid — like California — stand to lose billions of dollars as that money is doled out to states that didn’t — like Texas.

Sunday Hours: Obamacare Website To Be Shut Down For Portion of Most Weekends

The Trump administration plans to shut down the federal health insurance exchange for 12 hours during all but one Sunday in the upcoming open enrollment season.

The shutdown will occur from 12 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET on every Sunday except Dec. 10.

The Department of Health and Human Services will also shut down the federal exchange — healthcare.gov — overnight on the first day of open enrollment, Nov. 1. More than three dozen states use that exchange for their marketplaces.

HHS officials disclosed this information Friday during a webinar with community groups that help people enroll.

GOP Health Bill’s Changes Go Far Beyond Preexisting Conditions

The latest GOP effort to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act is getting a lot of attention, even if its passage seems unlikely. But there is far more to the measure than its changes to rules regarding preexisting health conditions.

In fact, the bill proposed by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.) would disrupt the existing health system more than any of the measures considered so far this year, according to supporters and critics.

Money-Saving Offer For Medicare’s Late Enrollees Is Expiring. Can They Buy Time?

Many older Americans who have Affordable Care Act insurance policies are going to miss a Sept. 30 deadline to enroll in Medicare, and they need more time to make the change, advocates say.

A lifetime of late enrollment penalties typically await people who don’t sign up for Medicare Part B — which covers doctor visits and other outpatient services — when they first become eligible. That includes people who mistakenly thought that because they had insurance through the ACA marketplaces, they didn’t need to enroll in Medicare.

High, Low Levels of Magnesium Linked to Dementia Risk

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News Picture: High, Low Levels of Magnesium Linked to Dementia RiskBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

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WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Having magnesium levels that are too high or too low may put you at risk for Alzheimer’s and other dementias, Dutch researchers report.

In a study of more than 9,500 men and women, the highest or lowest levels of magnesium appeared to increase the chances for dementia by as much as 30 percent.

“At this moment, magnesium levels are not routinely measured in daily clinical practice,” said lead researcher Dr. Brenda Kieboom, of Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam. “If our study results are replicated, magnesium levels could be used to screen for dementia, especially in people at risk for low magnesium levels.”

Lonza launches new CytoSMART 2 System for capturing higher-resolution images of live cells

September 21, 2017

Lonza has today introduced the CytoSMART™ 2 System, an updated version of Lonza’s popular CytoSMART™ System for live cell imaging. The CytoSMART™ 2 Device features an advanced optical system and more powerful camera unit, which enables researchers to capture higher-resolution images of their cell cultures. Images taken can be digitally enlarged two-fold to display more cellular detail for enhanced monitoring of cell cultures, migration assays and differentiation experiments.

Caregivers Draw Support By Mapping Their Relationships

DENVER — Every time Jacque Pearson tried to devise a plan to move her 81-year-old dad, who has Alzheimer’s, from his home in Boise, Idaho, to hers in Denver, she felt stuck. Then, two weeks ago, she had a breakthrough.

It happened at an AARP-sponsored session in which Pearson created a “CareMap” — a hand-drawn picture showing all the people she cares for as well as the people surrounding those individuals and her own sources of support.

Open Your Mouth And Say Goo-Goo: Dentists Treating Ever-Younger Patients

Allen Barron scrunches up his tiny face and wails as his mother gently tips him backward onto the lap of Jean Calvo, a pediatric dental resident at the University of California-San Francisco.

Allen’s crying may be distressing, but his wide-open mouth allows Calvo to begin the exam. She counts his baby teeth and checks for dental decay.

“Nothing I am going to do will hurt him,” Calvo tells Allen’s mother, Maritza Barron, who is holding her son’s hands.

To some, the 20-month-old toddler may seem far too young for a dental exam. In fact, he’s on the late side, according to leading dental and pediatric professional associations.